Adams Arms .308 Piston Driven AR10

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I got to shoot Adams Arms new .308 piston driven AR10 at the 2015 SHOT Show Range Day. They’re currently not for sale to the general public as of yet, they did do a preorder which filled up very quickly. The AR10 I got to fondle was their competition model which had an upgraded trigger, free float rail, muzzle brake and Luth AR fixed stock. It was pretty lightweight for being an AR10 and a piston AR10 at that (sorry I didn’t find out the total weight), and it ran very smoothly. Checkout AdamsArms.net for more info.

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adams-arms-308-ar10-competition

The new lineup includes 4 models with options and price points from entry level all the way to the FAST model, which will be able to outperform and outlast anything on the market. With MSRPs ranging from $1329.99 to $2999.99 there is a model to fit every need and budget.

All Rifles will Feature:

Voodoo Innovations Melonited Barrels
Guaranteed Accuracy for Life
Pressure Relief Cuts under the Barrel Extension
LifeCoat Brass Saver Bolts
Kidney Shaped Ejector
Proprietary design that allows brass to Eject Cleanly and Efficiently, while preserving it for reloading
LifeCoat Coating
This provides the Lubricity of the Nickel with the Corrosion Resistance and Hardness of the PVD, increasing the life of the part exponentially
Electro-less Nickel Base Coating
PVD Top-Coating
Other VDI LifeCoated Parts:

Nickel Base/PVD Top-Coat
XLP Adjustable Gas Block and Selector (on Free-Float Models)
Melonite
Picatinny Adjustable Gas Block (on Standard & MOE Models)
Drive Rod
Jet Comp (on Free-Float Models)
Cam Pin
PVD
1 Piece Bolt Carrier
Firing Pin
Fire Control Group



Ray I.

Long time gun enthusiast, archery noob, Mazda fan, Sci-Fi nerd, Whiskey drinker, online marketer and blogger. My daily firearms musings can be found over at my gun blog ArmoryBlog.com and Instagram.

Shoot me an email at ray.i@staff.thefirearmblog.com


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  • Axel

    Is this a slimmed down .308 caliber, ar-15 style rifle, like the DPMS gen 2?

  • MoPhil

    At least it uses the XLP gas block. I hope sooo much that AA will make .308 Conversion Kits, like they did for the AR-15.

    • Andrew

      What’s wrong with the AA Lite block?

  • Vitor Roma

    That is one sleek .308 gun. At first glance, I thought it was a 5.56.

  • Marty Ewer

    I got to handle a couple of these today. They are light! And very well priced. They are essentiaaly all AR-15-spec except the magwell, bolt head, and barrel. And prices star at $1198, if I remember correctly.

  • Rusty Shackleford

    Will they offer piston uppers in .308 or does it need a modified lower receiver?

  • Adam aka eddie d.

    I don’t really like the direction .308 AR development is taking.
    Instead of figuring out a universal set of specifications, mfr.s are going all wild on the platform.

    I do understand the need for a lighter weight in .308 and very much welcome quality change, but introducing all sorts of different standards and a heck of a lot of variables without a clear and comprehensive set of specs the industry could follow is not a good idea IMO.

    DPMS/Remington Outdoor Company (or whatever they’re called now) made a serious mistake with not releasing the exact specs/patents of their Gen 2 platform for open-source.
    Magpul did it with M-LOK, before that Keymod was open-sourced by VLTOR and got standardised by the efforts of BCM and other companies.

    ROC’s decision to keep their system for themselves will make a whole lot of mess in the .308 world not that companies figured out there’s a huge market to lightweight .308 semi autos that are compatible with AR15 parts.
    At least I can’t see the benefits of all sorts of “tactical companies” popping up overnight and going batsh…excrement crazy on creating AR15-AR10 hybrids, which seems to be the new trend numero uno.
    Civilian market can be a godsend but a curse too.
    I can’t see all these small to mid budget companies providing service and parts support for their creations after let’s say 5-8 years into the service life of a firearm.
    They often have difficulties with stuff they made 2-3 years ago (XY handguard, optic, receiver Generation 4-5-6 ring a bell to anyone?).

    Maybe I’m pessimistic, I don’t know.