SIG Sauer Adds .45s, Subcompacts to P320 Line

P320_Subcompact2

SIG continues to eye the top spot of pistol manufacturers in the US in releasing new additions to its P320 line:

NEWINGTON, N.H. (January 12, 2015) — SIG SAUER, Inc., redefined the polymer-framed, striker-fired handgun with last year’s introduction of the modular P320®. This year, SIG SAUER® continues to expand on that modularity with the introduction of .45-caliber variants, subcompact models, and two new finish options.

With the modular design of the P320, there is no end to the variation of models,” said Jeff Creamer, “So, for 2015 we’ve added to the large end, with the addition of models chambered in .45Auto. We’ve also added to the small end, with new subcompact offerings.”

The P320 Compact in .45Auto utilizes the same modular fire control group as the rest of the P320 family. With user-selectable grip module sizes, P320 owners can set up their P320 pistols to have the same grip diameter and trigger pull, significantly reducing training time.

The P320 Subcompact places the same fire control module as the Fullsize, Carry, or Compact into a small, easy-to-carry package. Measuring just 6.67″ long and 1.06″ wide, the Subcompact frame holds 12 rounds of 9mm. It will also accept (15 round) and Fullsize (17 round) magazines. Weighing in at 24.9 ounces with a magazine, the P320 Subcompact is a perfect deep cover or backup option.

As with all P320 pistols, the Subcompact features a modular, one-piece stainless steel frame which is the serialized part. By simply removing the takedown pin, the fire-control module can be converted to accept different size grip modules. In addition, changing the length of barrel and caliber is as easy as field-stripping the gun. The P320 is available in 9mm, .40S&W, .357SIG and .45Auto.

Featuring one of the best out-of-the-box striker triggers on the market, the P320 trigger delivers a crisp, clear break measuring in at 5.5-6.5 lbs, and has a short, tactile reset. SIGLITE® night sights come standard on most models.

For those wanting to add a little color to their pistol, the P320 Flat Dark Earth (FDE) and Two-Tone FDE offer a break from the standard black polymer pistol. The FDE is completely finished in a PVD flat dark earth finish, with a matching polymer grip module.

-more-

The Two-Tone FDE offers the flat dark earth frame, with a Nitron® top end. As with all P320 models, slide assemblies and grip modules can be mixed and matched around the same fire-control module, allowing the shooter flexibility, without having to adapt to a different trigger pull.

P320® Compact
Caliber .45Auto
Action Type Double-Action Striker
Trigger Pull 5.5-6.5 lbs
Overall Height 5.5″
Overall Length 8.0″
Overall Width 1.06″
Barrel Length 3.9″
Sight Radius 5.8″
Weight w/Mag 26 oz
Mag Capacity 9 Rounds
Sights SIGLITE® Night Sights
Grip Modules Polymer
Frame One-piece Stainless Steel
Slide Finish Nitron®
Accessory Rail Yes
Options User-changeable grip modules
MSRP $713

more—

P320® Subcompact
Caliber 9mm
Action Type Double-Action Striker
Trigger Pull 5.5-6.5 lbs
Overall Height 4.67″
Overall Length 6.67″
Overall Width 1.06″
Barrel Length 3.55″
Sight Radius 5.45″
Weight w/Mag 24.9 oz
Mag Capacity 12 Rounds
Sights SIGLITE® Night Sights
Grip Modules Polymer
Frame One-piece Stainless Steel
Slide Finish Nitron®
Accessory Rail Yes
Options User-changeable grip modules
MSRP $713

Weights and dimensions are approximate. Specifications subject to change without notice.

.45 compacts don’t really appeal to me, but there is clearly a market for them. SIG continues to release new products this season, clearly aiming to carve out a wider market segment for themselves.



Nathaniel F

Nathaniel is a history enthusiast and firearms hobbyist whose primary interest lies in military small arms technological developments beginning with the smokeless powder era. In addition to contributing to The Firearm Blog, he runs 196,800 Revolutions Per Minute, a blog devoted to modern small arms design and theory. He can be reached via email at nathaniel.f@staff.thefirearmblog.com.


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  • gunslinger

    different strokes for different folks?
    variety is the spice of life?

  • Bill

    I’d say that’s more of a Commander – size pistol, instead of compact, unless they’ve shortened the grip and magazine. But then again you need a decoder ring to keep track of all the different SIG models available

  • JumpIf NotZero

    Selling a PPQ, will buy a P320.

    • USMC03Vet

      I wish the ranges had them to rent. If not then soon it’s going to be Grip Zone….

  • Just wait

  • USMC03Vet

    Striker fired.

    No overly long trigger pull.

  • floppyscience

    It’s basically just a striker-fired P250 with a nice, short trigger.

  • Smiddywesson

    “.45 compacts don’t really appeal to me”
    Love the round for a full sized gun, but I am also torn about a .45 in a subcompact.
    Argument #1:
    Most gun fights are up close and only a few rounds are fired, why not have a bigger round to make that first shot count?
    Argument #2
    A small compact is difficult enough to control already without having to readjust your grip every two shots because of recoil. Better off with a 9mm and a higher rate of fire.
    Bottom line: I’d love to shoot this gun to compare to my Glock 27 .40

    • Donnie Robertson

      I fired 50 rounds through a friends newly acquired P-320 in .45ACP……. I’ll not do THAT again! Gave my wimpy wrist a big “ache” and transferred the “ache” to the elbow. While typically one would not expect to detonate 50 rounds in a “self preservation” situation the bigger-hole could be beneficial. It could easily be my round of choice – but I would limit “practice” to perhaps 20 rounds and then give it a good scrubbing.

    • ExplEngineer

      I, too, was somewhat taken aback by the comment “.45(ACP) don’t really appeal to me”. I have to admit that it was just recently that I have come to recognize the utility of the .45ACP in the role of a self-defense round. After twenty-five (25) years as a Special Agent, including ten (10) years on the Special Response Team (SRT), [five (5) years as an Operator and and additional five (5) years as a Crisis and Hostage Negotiator] five (5) additional years as a Chief of Police [during which tenure, and recognizing the need for substantial basic ammunition load and the length of time required for a “backup unit” to arrive on any scene where hte nearest on-duty unit from a suporting agency could be more than fifty (50) miles away on two (2) lane rural roads, where as a department we transitioned to the FN Herstal 5.7 because of its large capacity factory magazine capacity] and ten years of private practice evolving into “of Counsel” status where I find myself carrying my firearm for personal protection rather than the active intervention in crisis situations, I have come to exactly the opposite conclusion of “Nathanial F”. I find myself carrying my Springfield Armory XDs .45ACP pistol as my “primary CCDW” firearm. As the progenitor of the newly developed “Small (sub)-Compact pistol, and having access to a firing range on premises I have had the opportunity top fire a significant number of rounds, at varying range(s), and under a number of scenarios that would be applicable to a civilian carrying a firearm under the legal auspices of a CCDW Permit, including several where an individual, due to circumstances might be required to execute a reloading drill due to both parties to the encounter having taken advantage of cover, and at least minimal concealment while awaiting the response of law enforcement to the site of the event. Additionally, the same scenarios were run utilizing a SigSauer P229, and the FN Herstal 5.7mm pistols. The preliminary issue arose out of the fact that most civilians do not carry supplemental magazines on their person, and from experience I have observed anecdotally that neither do off-duty law enforcement officers, therefore most drills will now be developed for the single magazine engagement fo adversaries. It then struck me that having started my career,and spent the first half of my law enforcement tenure carrying a revolver, even sub-compact pistols in caliber .45ACP have a combination magazine and ammunition carried in the chamber of the pistol that is greater that provided by the six (6) round cylinder of the revolver, compounded by the fact that reloading the sub-compact pistol with a magazine was far faster and easier than trying to reload the revolver cylinder even when using one of those ubiquitous “speed-loaders. After revising the testing models to adjust for the circumstances as indicated here (v.a.) and reviewing a substantial number of “use of force by civilian personnel” reports (the diversity and availability of data is not sufficient to present the findings as being statistically validated, however, they are sufficient in number and diversity to be considered within the context of the status of a “Reply” to a commentary presented in substantially equivalent format and formulary, I have it reasonable to conclude that the newer genre of “Sub-compact Class Pistols in caliber .45ACP, in the hands of an individual with a reasonable history, and adequate experience in the use of handguns is appropriate, and perhaps substantially functionally more appropriate than the larger capacity, smaller caliber pistols. “Compact” or “Full-Size” pistols. Two (2) additional observations, First, as a result of the comment of one individual pertaining to having shot fifty (50) rounds in one range session utilizing the original XDs pistol and did not experience any discomfort from having done so, and in fact I returned to the range to do some additional firing sessions with the same firearm. Secondly, in reviewing reports of “Use of Force” involving civilians and off-duty officers, again in a non-statistically validated population, and discussions with other retired Agents and Officers, I have found only one (1) event that occurred in circumstances where the range (as estimated in some cases where a Crime Scene or Shooting Team did not respond to the site to report validated measurements) that involved a range in excess of seven (7) meters, or in which more than five (5) rounds were fired by the CCDW-holder Civilian or the off-duty law enforcement officers. As a rule, non-law enforcement officers were uniformly involved in confrontations where the range, and distance between the parties was generally less than three (x<3m) meters, (Cont'd)

      • ExplEngineer

        Part II: … and most frequently four rounds or less (z</=4 rounds) four rounds, Given the diversity of factory-loaded, commercially available ammunition (the use of this type of ammunition is generally required by law enforcement agencies and recommended for use in firearms carried for personal defense rather than hand-loads, or ammunition reloaded into once-fired cases), there is realistic means of comparing muzzle-energy and velocity, let alone energy and velocity at the mean, or modal range of the confrontations, however, in applying my personal range of experience(s) I can see no circumstance where a "center of mass" hit upon an aggressor/opposing party in a confrontation at any range less than seven meters (r<7m), using any standard brand of commercially available ammunition utilizing a 230gr projectile, would be inadequate to terminate the event. Concluding, I cannot see why the author would have any valid reason to eschew the use of a "Sub-Compact" pistol in caliber .45ACP other than personal preference, which is individual, and non-controvertible reason only for the individual in question, rather than a commentary on the class and caliber of the firearm series in question.

      • Smiddywesson

        Back in the day, the FBI issued their ammo report, which indicated, if memory serves, that the average gunfight was 1.2 rounds and 6 feet or closer. I used to teach firearms, and the first thing I’d do when discussing ammo was take a 9mm and a .45 and trace around them on a sheet of paper, or if I was prepared, pass around a few expanded rounds. The difference in calibers is not that overwhelming, but their corresponding expanded versions are very different. Combine that observation with the number of times you’ve heard about somebody being downed or killed, or even spared, because a bullet did or did not knick something, and you’ve made a pretty good case for carrying the biggest caliber you can reliably control.
        Anyway, this was my line of reasoning.