Remington 700 Police 5R RACS Review

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One of the guns I was able to try out during a recent work trip was the Remington 700 Police 5R RACS. The rifle I used had an AAC suppressor and Leupold optics, and since this rifle is also chambered in .308 Win, which is one of my favorite calibers, I couldn’t pass it by.

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This is a 5R, meaning this rifle uses a series of 5 lands and grooves in a twist, and the lands have a sloping rather than straight wall. More specifically, it has a 115 degree angle between the lands and grooves which is a contrast to the standard, which is 90 degrees. What that translates to is a variety of things. First, it means your barrel arrives slightly “broken in” for lack of a better term. A 5R barrel right out of the box is configured a bit like a standard barrel that’s had a few hundred rounds through it already. In addition it can also deliver a slight increase in fps (some rounds show a 100fps increase with a 5R barrel). When 5R first hit the market it was advertised as the end-all, be-all of barrel technology, and although it was overblown in some ways the naysayers claiming it’s no better than a standard barrel are also mistaken. It’s more accurate, cuts down on fouling, and as an added bonus it’s easier to clean, too.

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I took a moment to fit the stock to my shoulder and discovered the LOP was too short, so I made use of the adjustable stock, lengthening it as far as it would go. Then I discovered the bill of my baseball hat was in the way, so I turned it around. Next came a slight adjustment to the optics, followed by the discovery that the angle I needed the rifle at required a sandbag – or something. With nothing in sight I used my hand, making a fist, turning my hand on end, and placing it under the pistol grip. This meant I was shooting prone in a somewhat different position than usual – habit is habit, after all – but it ended up being just fine.

 

Firing was done from 100 yards because the goal of the rifle range was tight groups as opposed to testing the guns’ long-range capabilities. With the stock fully opened it tucked into my shoulder comfortably, making the reach far more natural than it had been with the stock closed. The trigger was slightly stiff with a nice, crisp break and within a few rounds I was no longer noticing my initial perception of a stiff trigger. The pistol grip had slight grooves and was textured for a positive grip and it fit my hand surprisingly well; I often have problems with a grip being too small or otherwise uncomfortable, but this one not only worked well but felt good in my bare hand. With a suppressor this was a quiet rifle, so quiet I almost missed the “Hear me roar” boom of an unsuppressed .308 Win.

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Overall, this is a nice rifle. It’s capable of sub-MOA, just as Phil discovered the 700 Police AAC he shot is; these Remington LE rifles are absolutely capable of the accuracy they’re advertised for, as I like to say, you bring the skill, the rifle brings the rest. This particular model is supposed to be capable of sub-MOA at 200 yards as well, which it would’ve been nice to see; maybe next time. That really is impressive for a rifle right out of the box.

I should probably admit my love of .308 Win before saying how much I liked this rifle. I could easily have stayed prone and sent lead down-range until I ran out of ammo, but unfortunately we had more to do that day. The 700 Police 5R RACS is an accurate gun, and with the suppressor it’s a sneaky, accurate gun. I may not be a police sharpshooter but I’d love to have one of these rifles for some hunting of the four-legged variety. Say what you want, but I believe Remington has some excellent guns out there, and this is definitely one of them.

700 Police 5R RACS, Model 86589 Specs:

Chambered in .308 Win

20” barrel

40X trigger

5R rifling with 1 in 11.25 twist

Suppressor-ready threaded muzzle, 5/8×24

RACS short-action chassis

Comes with two mags



katie.ainsworth

Katie is an avid shooter, hunter, military journalist, and Southern girl. Firearms are her passion whether at the range or on a spot-and-stalk after a big buck. She’s a staff writer at The Firearm Blog and writes about guns, hunting, and the military for various publications both online and in print such as Outdoor Life, Handguns, and Shooting Illustrated. Shoot her a message at ainsworth.kat@usa.com


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  • The price hasn’t been set. We asked —-

    • iksnilol

      If they sell it for 1500 USD, the only advantage over the Sauer SSG 3000 it has is the folding stock.

      But I somehow doubt this will be in the 700-1000 USD market.

      • Dracon1201

        The chassis might be in the 700-1000 USD Market. The rifle won’t be.

  • thedonn007

    What is the MSRP on that? Also, for some reason the barrel looks like it is shorter than 20″

    • The way the barrel is set in the stock it looks shorter but it was indeed a 22 inch. They had no price to give us at that time. Just a guess but I’d say around $2200 plus or minus a couple hundred.

  • iksnilol

    For the love of God, some pictures of groups would be nice.

    I didn’t know whether I wanted to be polite or sarcastically rude, so I went with a confusing combination. Also MOA isn’t dependent on distance.

    • With a constant rotation of shooters going downrange wasn’t something we could do just anytime we wanted. I used a large spotting scope. The groups were fired into a 2 inch round orange patch. One group I fired had five rounds touching overlapping each other. Knowing the target size the groups were sub MOA viewed through the spotting scope.

  • No it won’t and didn’t.

  • Patrick Karmel Shamsuddoha

    i just want the stock !!! and more pictures !!!!

  • I believe she pointed out that I did. The kind of testing your talking about doing is an all day project at best. We stayed very busy and that kind of testing isn’t possible.
    The ammo used was Barnes and Remington match.

  • “Comes with two mags”

    Katie,

    A reasonable evaluation of this rifle would tell us a bit more about those magazines, for instance, ‘Are they proprietary to this gun or will it take other mags – and which ones?’, and how many cartridges do the magazines hold and are larger or smaller capacity mags available.

    An awful lot of people believe the only thing wrong with the Remington 700 rifle is the non-detachable magazines. There is a significant after-market for conversions. They are expensive and who knows about their reliability. The fact that Remington is offering the 700 with detachable mags is significant.

  • iksnilol

    Tony, you do realize that MOA is not a group under an inch at 100 yards (AKA under 30mm at 100 meters)? 1 MOA is one inch at 100 yards, two inches at 200 yards, three inches at 300 yards and so on.

    I hope I do not sound condenscending here.

    • Tassiebush

      G’day iksnilol, my take on Tony’s reply to Matt’s comment was he means Minute Of Angle in the correct sense and he’s just referring to the way a gun may no longer group into the same MOA at extended range due to effects sometimes found further out like crosswind, differing air density, dropping out of supersonic flight and bullet rotation dropping to a level where it no longer stabilizes the round as effectively. Not big factors with normal shooting but at least some of those might be measurable in long rang precision shooting.

  • Tassiebush

    fair point