Nicholas C

Co-Founder of KRISSTALK forums, an owner’s support group and all things KRISS Vector related. Nick found his passion through competitive shooting while living in NY. He participates in USPSA and 3Gun. He loves all things that shoots and flashlights. Really really bright flashlights.

Any questions please email him at nicholas.c@staff.thefirearmblog.com


Advertisement

  • Zachary marrs

    This will not end well

  • Rusty

    Amazing. Taking a German or Russian word and saying it like a German or a Russian gives you the correct pronunciation. Mystery solved. Thanks.

    • percynjpn

      Who woulda thunk it?

    • skusmc

      I’ve been corrected on Garand before, but all the WWII and Korean vets I’ve met pronounced it the “incorrect” way. So I’m gonna keep doing that.

      • Tinklebell

        According to John Garand’s descendants, the correct pronunciation rhymes with ‘errand’. Never met a WWII or Korea vet so I don’t even know how they pronounce it.

        • Hopsaregood

          I have a bunch or had I should say and they used the common American way. Good enough for them, good enough for me. And they carried Garand’s all over the world.

          • MichaelZWilliamson

            I’m going to call you Hopsa Regood. That’s what it looks like, and who cares what your family thinks?

          • Zachary marrs

            Technically, the “garand” isn’t even part of the official name, so the pronuciation doesn’t matter

      • Zebra Dun

        As In my Gunny calling the M-1 a Gar-rand as opposed to Garaand.
        So it’s actually Gerrend?
        Now what about the Stoner/Armalite/Colt AR-15?

  • Anonymoose

    I’ve been saying “psyguh” and “gairund” since I learned of them. I’m still gonna say “Tavor” as “tayver” to annoy people.

    • ToMaZi

      The phonetic spelling really made me laugh there – Hebrew is as straight forward as you can get in terms of pronunciation – “Ta-voRR” (guttural R and you’re done).

  • mechamaster

    “drah-goon-aff” make me ROFL.

  • Jeff

    You can’t mispronounce firearms. You can mispronounce their names.

    • Grindstone50k

      When your firearm mispronounces, you should perform an immediate action drill.

  • Duke_Digger

    to me, this is like her-aldo ri-vera (sic) reverting to spanish in the middle of an English sentence.
    How would you pronounce “llano” ? Depends on what language you are speaking.

    • Mystick

      You forgot to roll your R’s…

    • Tinklebell

      ‘Yano’

  • gunslinger

    who calls it a “ka-LASH-na-kov”?

    never heard that

    • schizuki

      I do. That’s how it’s spelled and I’ve never heard it pronounced differently.

    • iksnilol

      How do you pronounce it? Also, I pronounce it “Ka-laš-ni-kov”. Sorry for the bold writing, my keyboard doesn’t have the proper letter so I had to copy paste.

      • gunslinger

        i’ve heard it “KA-lish-na-kov” before i ever saw it spelled out. so i never drug out the second a.

    • Hank Seiter

      I do, too, though I think the ending “v” should be more of an “uhf”. But I’m not Russian but in interviews I’ve heard him pronounce his own family name in Russian and that’s what it sounds like to my 60 year old ears.

  • Tom

    Or you could just carry on anglicizing them as I am sure no one really cares all that much.

  • Zugunder

    Yeah, as native Russian speaker I can confirm that all Russian names in this video sounds authentic. But I would imagine English speakers gonna have problems pronouncing them this way. It doesn’t matter how you call them as long as you enjoy them I guess.

    • Zugunder

      BTW, always wondered why Americans calling AKS-74U the “Krinkov”? Where this nickname came from?

      • Zachary marrs

        No one knows

        • Jonathan Ferguson

          Yes they do: it’s from Krinks gun shop in Florida, who popularised shorty AKs in the early 90s. Krinks + kalashnikov = Krinkov.

      • Mike

        Legend says the name comes from an old issue of Soldier of Fortune magazine.

      • n0truscotsman

        There are many speculations, but I’ve seen no facts about its origin.
        Its a dumb name anyways.

      • iksnilol

        Do you (Russians) pronounce the “v” in the end of a word as “f”? I always wondered, since just prononuce it “Kalašjnikov” (Americans, don’t try to pronounce that).

        • Zugunder

          You supposed to pronounce”v” as “v”, but some folks pronounce it so shortly that it sounds like “f” plus some people (me included) pronounce “o” before “v” as “a”. But I guess it depends on what part of Russia you live in. I live in south-west (about 20km from Ukrainian border) and we pronounce a lot of things “not right way”. Perhaps somebody who live in Moscow would confuse me with Ukrainian just because of my pronunciation.

          • iksnilol

            Thanks for the info. We from Bosnia pronounce it as “Kalašnjikov” while many Americans (at least online) pronounce it as “Kalashnikof”.

    • Eddie_Baby

      Considering they are they are originally spelled in Cyrillic, they could be spelled phonetically using the Roman alphabet. I don’t get it.

  • Ian Thorne

    HK’s own website says it should be pronounced “Coke”. So I am gonna go with that.

  • DIR911911 .

    they only get called heckler und koch in legal papers , otherwise it’s pronounced H&K

    • Anonymoose

      Drop the &.

  • DIR911911 .

    so basically just use the appropriate racist accent for country of origin , got it , get it , good.

    • schizuki

      German is a race?

  • Seburo

    Shouldn’t the German firearms and Heckler & Koch’s names have more drunken slurring? I keed. My last name is actually German.

  • andrey kireev

    Being Russian, it’s quite easy to pronounce these.. heh

  • Zachary marrs

    Da. Smeet und vesson ist wünderbar

    Dasvidanya, comrad.

    Im so sorry, i couldn’t help it

    • CZFan

      man you went all over the place with that one, half russian half german lol
      ” dasvidanya tovarich”

      (goodbye comrade)

      • jcitizen

        хорошо товарищем

    • Archie Montgomery

      I’ve always preferred the pronunciation of “Smite and Waste’em”.

  • SP mclaughlin

    volkSWAGen

  • Zugunder

    Yep, sayga, saiga, whatever, pronounced pretty much right in the video. That’s interesting legend, I never heard myself somebody calling it “suchka” but I can see how such nickname can be uhm… Created for this gun, if you mix around letters in AKS-74U (number 4 looks somewhat like Russian letter “Ч” which pronounced like “ch” in “cheese”) you’ll get nickname “СУЧКА” or “SUCHKA”

    p.s. Sorry my messed up English.

    • Zachary marrs

      Ive always heard it got the name from it being such a, ahem, “SUCHKA” to shoot

      • Zugunder

        Well then, it have really convenient set of letters in it’s name, ha-ha!

    • It gets easier if you go back to original protorype, the AKSU. It has SU in a row.

  • Grindstone50k

    Smitho y Wessoniguez.

  • Grindstone50k

    SEGA

  • Grindstone50k

    folksvagen

  • Grindstone50k

    They’re basically correct with the Mauser, because that’s what it means in Englisch.

  • Grindstone50k

    The correct way to pronounce Porsche is “Douche Canoe”.

    • Vitsaus

      You have won the comments section with the above.

    • iksnilol

      How is a Porsche a douche canoe? I mean, it is the affordable sports car and it is a pretty fun car too.

      • Nicholas Chen

        Depends. Some say the Toyota GT86 aka Scion FRS is an affordable sports car.

      • Grindstone50k

        It’s called “a joke”

        • iksnilol

          I know, I got the joke but I have also been in a Porsche and it is fun. Like really fun.

          I guess I should go all Canadian on you and apologize for ruining your joke: “sorry, eh?”.

      • percynjpn

        Ha! Affordable?! When’s the last time you priced one?

        • iksnilol

          Compared to Ferraris and Lamborghinis they are much more affordable and provide pretty much the same performance. Here in Norway I can get a Porsche 911 (the one you can’t joke about in the US) for about a mill NOK (about 135k USD). Compare that to more than double that for a Lambo or something.

      • gunslinger

        DC? because it’s a “porsh-a” all said with a smug look on the face.

        much like the people who shop at the bulleyeretailer Tar-zhay

        at least that’s my take

  • Grindstone50k

    If there are no Germans or Russians in earshot, does it still matter?

  • So we mispronounce foreign names, because we don’t speak the native language and use English when reading the names written in English. Okay. Got it. I think many of us knew this already.
    Forgive me if I keep using the common pronunciations because I prefer to not sound like an elitist hipster knowitall. And so people know what I’m talking about, because common pronunciations.

    • Giolli Joker

      The funny thing is that apparently even Garand is not commonly pronounced as it should. 🙂

      • It’s French.

      • percynjpn

        That is the way Mr. Garand pronounced his name; when the Army adopted the weapon, they slightly changed the intonation of his name, which is no surprise. Wow – hilarious.

        • Ryan Osborn

          Believe Jesus Christ is your savior for your sins. Jesus Christ is God Almighty in the Flesh. This is the Gospel, believe Jesus Christ shed his precious blood and died for you and all of your sins on the cross, he was buried and he rose again from the dead three days later from God’s Power and you will be saved, you are a Born Again Christian and you will go to Heaven forever. All have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God to where we all deserve death, destruction and judgement in the Lake of Fire from the wrath of God to where we need a savior to save us for our sins forever. By receiving Jesus Christ’s blood sacrifice as full payment for your sins you will be saved forever. It matters not how much you have sinned in the past, in the present and in the future. Once you are saved you are saved forever no matter what. Good works will not ever save you and no one and nothing else will. That is the Gospel and if you believe in the Gospel you are now a Born Again Christian and you are now saved and you will go to Heaven forever and that is the whole truth. Spread the truth. All glory goes to God forever! Praise God Amen! (John Ch. 3:16, Romans Ch. 3:25, 4:1-6, 5:9, 1 Corinthians Ch. 15:1-4, Ephesians Ch. 2:8-9) The Authorized King James Version Bible.

    • Steve_7

      A name is a name, isn’t it? I mean if you were in Russia or Germany you would still expect people to pronounce your name correctly.

  • schizuki

    How about Carcano? I always thought it was “Car-SAHN-oh”. Then I saw a feature on American Rifleman and some of the talking heads were pronouncing it “Car-KAHN-oh.”

    Speaking of which, I always go with MAHN-lik’r. Way too awkward to talk about a MAN-lick-er action.

    • Giolli Joker

      Italian here: Car-KAHN-oh looks more like it should be pronounced.
      (A couple of grammar rules: in Italian you read C as K whenever it’s followed by A, O or U; you read C as “CH” (as in cheese) whenever it’s followed by I (I in Italian always sounds like I at the beginning of Italy or India) or E; you read again C as “K” when it’s followed by H and I or E (think of the pronunciation of CHIappa: key-AHH-puh). I hope this helps.)

      • schizuki

        Molte grazie!

        Hmmm, according to your instructions, my family mispronounces our last name. It’s Schipani, which we’ve always pronounced “Shih-PAHN-ee”, but apparently it’s “skih-PAHN-ee”, with a hard C (in English, a C pronounced as S is called a “soft” C, a C pronounced as K is called a “hard” C.)

        The things you learn on TFB…

  • JSmath

    T’vor.

    Gere’und.

    MOVING ON.

  • iksnilol

    All Germans I know pronounce it as ko-[choking sound].

    • Tinklebell

      Yeah I’ve been all over Germany and that’s how it’s pronounced in any regional dialect I can think of.

  • Dan

    And not a peep about Walther, the most mispronounced name ever.

    Not a firearm manufacturer, but Fiocchi is the most mispronounced ammo manufacturer name.

  • S O

    Guess what? When Germans pronounce a Mr. Cook’s name, they pronounce exactly that – not a germanised version (“kook” or “zook”).

    And we call S&W “Smith and Wesson” – exactly that way, correct pronounciation.

    • Zebra Dun

      Ach Du Lieber!

      • William Wallace

        Ich bin ein gut Berliner!

        Bitten und Auf Wiedersen!

    • E Wolfe

      You may have started a trend mein freund; too many zooks spoil the broth. 😉

      • The Brigadier

        Mein Gott in himmel. Vas ist los? I think I will go out and frie up a lot of frittahs in Vesson Oil and forget about all this.

  • gunsandrockets

    And not only that, John Garand was French Canadian too!

  • YS

    I’m surprised Walther was not on the list.
    My understanding is that proper pronunciation is closer to Valter. Any German speakers care to weigh in?

  • Nunn Yabizz

    I wasted one minute and sixteen seconds of my life watching that garbage.

    • Hank Seiter

      And another minute commenting here.
      Just sayin’.

  • percynjpn

    What kind firearms do they make?

  • Ian Thorne

    It doesn’t matter how you pronounce it. Words have different pronunciations in different languages. In English we don’t have that raspy vocalization, so we say it different.

  • People mispronouncing Kalashnikov as Kal-ish-nikov is my pet hate. Just read how it’s spelled! You’ll get pretty damn close if you just take a second to read it properly!

  • Hopsaregood

    Someone certainly does not have much to do eh? Or is someone just wanting to show his complete mastery of several ‘furrin’ languages?

  • Hank Seiter

    Interesting. But good point, SD3. I think we’re mostly dealing with specific language inflection or ethnic accent. For example, I now Mosin is pronounced Mo’ shun because it’s Russian, but I’ll continue saying Mo’ sin.
    I’ve heard about most of these renderings and I agree that’s how they should be pronounced in their native languages (Gare-und was Canadian, eh), but this is America and I’m not going to be a stick-in-the-butt literalist on the firing line except in the case of pronouncing Heckler and Koh’, I’m tired of hearing Heckler and Kotch or Koke.

  • Bob

    SD3, your “Smeet und Vesson” made me chuckle so much that it made me snarf my morning coffee, thanks! Cough! Snort!

  • Yojimbo556

    After two years in a gun shop my favorites are still Smith N’ Western and Sig Sawyer.

  • Bob

    One other thing…
    What do we care how their names are pronounced? As long as they go “bang”, that’s all that matters.

    • MichaelZWilliamson

      I call them Buzz and Woody. That’s how I feel when I shoot them.

  • uisconfruzed

    Those were all VERY close to the correct pronunciation, I knew that Sako would be at the top of the list. It didn’t even make it there?

  • H. Dale Jennings

    An M-1 Grand will always be an M-1 Grand.

  • Zebra Dun

    Der Smeet Und Vesson M- 29 10.66 mm Ist Ein Gut Earschplittenloudenboomer!

  • Zebra Dun

    Heckler and Crotch, Koctch, Koh oh forget about it.

  • Ned Weatherby

    But they didn’t touch Sako.

  • maodeedee

    Hekler und kokh? I always thought it was “Heckle and Chuckle”

  • maodeedee

    Not many people know this but venereal disease in Russia is called “Rotchyercrotchoff” and Vaseline in German is called “Weinerschlippen”

  • Archie Montgomery

    The English word ‘desperate’ means ‘having an urgent need’ and is pronounced ‘des – per- it’ with the emphasis on the first syllable.

    For example, “The author of this essay was really desperate for a subject upon which to write today”.

  • Steve_7

    HA! I WAS RIGHT! Although trying to get Americans to pronounce anything foreign is next to impossible, they had to invade Iraq before they figured out the pronunciation. Don’t even get me started on things like: “New Orleans”, “Coeur D’Alene” or: “Boise”.

  • petru sova

    I think I should publish a dictionary for Europeans visiting in the U.S. or British visiting in the U.S. It would be called “Translations of a corrupted English language in the “Hillbilly vernacular”.

  • Ryan Osborn

    Believe Jesus Christ is your savior for your sins. Jesus Christ is God Almighty in the Flesh. This is the Gospel, believe Jesus Christ shed his precious blood and died for you and all of your sins on the cross, he was buried and he rose again from the dead three days later from God’s Power and you will be saved, you are a Born Again Christian and you will go to Heaven forever. All have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God to where we all deserve death, destruction and judgement in the Lake of Fire from the wrath of God to where we need a savior to save us for our sins forever. By receiving Jesus Christ’s blood sacrifice as full payment for your sins you will be saved forever. It matters not how much you have sinned in the past, in the present and in the future. Once you are saved you are saved forever no matter what. Good works will not ever save you and no one and nothing else will. That is the Gospel and if you believe in the Gospel you are now a Born Again Christian and you are now saved and you will go to Heaven forever and that is the whole truth. Spread the truth. All glory goes to God forever! Praise God! Amen! (John Ch. 3:16, Romans Ch. 3:25, 4:1-6, 5:9, 1 Corinthians Ch. 15:1-4, Ephesians Ch. 2:8-9) The Authorized King James Version Bible.

  • E Wolfe

    Ha ha, I’m really going to get all those down pat, so my friends can look at me and say to themselves; who’s he kidding, he’s just a poser.

    As many others have already stated; who cares.

    But thanks TFB, it was instructive and I, for one, appreciate the video.

  • cledco

    I’ve never heard anyone mispronounce Tavor, or say the “w” like a “w” on Sturmgewehr (assuming they even know what that is, to the unchurched it’s usually an MP-44 only). I’ve seen some failures on Steyr, just not the one in the video. The rest is pretty spot on.