Jaco Western homebuilt pistol spotted in India

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A number of factories raided by police near the Uttar Pradesh/Haryana boarder in India appear to have been producing copies of the Jaco Western pistol, a popular DIY design published in 1972 and sold via mail order in the USA.

jacowesterndesign

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Many more Indian homemade pistols can be seen in a previous article posted here.




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  • echelon

    Raiders gonna raid I guess…

    Class let’s learn a lesson: Don’t make objects “illegal” or “banned”. If a person uses ANY object to harm another then punish the perpetrator appropriately.

  • iksnilol

    I have always been interested in the Jaco design. One thing I wondered is would it be problematic to scale it up (+ a stock and long barrel) to 12 gauge and make a shotgun out of it?

    That and making it doublebarreled is something I am interested.

    • Parabellum

      Blow it up in photoshop until it’s life-sized then chop out and increase the barrel diameter to 1″. This will tell you where to shorten the frame, lug, extractor etc. Weld a 1″ steel circle to the breech in line with the barrel. For a double barrel, double the thickness on everything and double up the action + barrels. Bend one trigger at a different angle also. Obviously condensed, but you should get the idea.

      • iksnilol

        I presumed the double barrel one wasn’t hard. Thanks for the idea in scaling up the drawings. Didn’t think about that, I thought more about just finding the size ratio between the shotgun barrel and the pistol then scale up all the parts with this ratio.

        • Tassiebush

          If you follow the link to previous article by improguns from this one it has plans you can download for khyber pass pistol already scaled for 12guage. Not same design but cool!

          • iksnilol

            Thanks! I sorta have a love/hate relationship with singleshots. On one hand they only have a single shot but on the other hand they have so much potential (integrally suppressed barrel, multiple barrels, etc) and of course they are hard to screw up.

          • Tassiebush

            Glad to help. You could add positives of weight reduction and slim profile and length too. A colleague was telling me yesterday about his brother’s talents in shooting rapidly with a single barrel shotgun. Technique involved holding a few shells in his mouth which kept them close to breech when he opened it. Sounds like it was ejector model. Said he was fast enough that others assumed he was using a pump when they were shooting wallabies. Food for thought about how technique can partially overcome rate of fire issues. Shell size would help too.

          • Tassiebush

            Then again a shell holder sleeve on stock might be just as good.

          • iksnilol

            Shells in mouth? seems interesting. Did he just spit them in the chamber?

            True regarding technique. I can shoot a bolt action pretty fast by squeezing the trigger with my middle finger (index and thumb are on the bolt handle). The rifle is held with your left hand and shoulder thus freeing up your right hand (Note: I use a sling with that technique).

          • Tassiebush

            I couldn’t get much specific into about exactly how his brother did it. Seemed largely to be about reducing distance between breech and where extras were held. May have held more in hands for all i know. Always delighted to hear about that bolt manipulation technique! Working to develop same skill myself. Watching lots of those Norwegian stangskyting matches. bolt actions are a fair bit faster than a lot give them credit for when it comes to aimed fire. My guess is it’s a skill people have largely forgotten. In many countries generations have used semi automatics if they felt they needed quick follow up shots. Never learn to work bolt properly and when they use a bolt action they think they have to take it off their shoulder.

          • iksnilol

            It is a bit wierd technique, it is strange to shoot with your middle finger at first. I do like semi-autos but can get by with a bolt action too, main reason I like autoloaders is that I can watch my target, shoot, see the impact and then shoot again (and with a scope you can easily holdover). With a bolt action that process is a bit different, since I have to choose between shooting quickly or seeing my impact clearly.

            Best of both worlds IMO is getting a semi auto with a gas shutoff. Like the Yugo AKs with the grenade launcher sight that cuts of gas.

          • Tassiebush

            I must say I am jealous. Semi-autos are banned here and I had no experience of them back when they weren’t (pre 1996). I suspect an accurate variant of the AR15 with a low power variable scope would be great for wallaby.
            I find I can generally still see target continuously through scope while I work bolt but there is some horizontal movement of scope as I do so. That’s while standing with a .223 though. Other positions and cartriges may be better or worse depending on bolt lift, stock fit, recoil etc.
            I’ll have to do some dry firing practice with that middle finger technique and give it a go on a target one evening soon. That Yugo AK with gas piston turned off sounds similar to a Browning Maral i.e. straight
            pull with return spring. Sounds very fun to plink and play with!

          • iksnilol

            Yeah, only difference is that it is cheaper than the Maral. You are in Australia, right? Shame you can’t have semi autos. In my opinion, an AK-104 with a suppressor, scope and folding stock is pretty much the most practical gun. Especially for farmwork and the like.

            What rifles and cartridges do you use in Australia? I would presume 308 and 303 are popular. Here in Norway 308, 30-06 and 6.5×55 is pretty popular. 5.56/223 is more popular than 7.62×39 but x39 is also used. Intermediate cartridges are used for “small” game like fox, wolverine and the like. While in Bosnia (my homeland) 8mm Mauser is pretty popular, also a lot of the hunting cartridges are popular (7mm mag and other necked up/down variants).

            Mauser variants are popular in both Norway and Bosnia. Though Bosnia has a lot more varied weapons due to the restricted nature of weapons and the war leading people to keeping illegal weapons.

          • Tassiebush

            Yes Australia, Tasmania to be specific where hunting is a little different to mainland. Down here .223 is very popular for wallabies which are very common with a 12month season. The .22lr and .22mag very popular too. .243 is popular all rounder as it’s legal minimum for deer but people use all of those cartridges you mentioned too except for 7.62×39 which was popular in pre ban days with SKS. .270 pretty popular for deer too and 6.5×55 has a following thanks to surplus swedish mausers. Certainly lots of .303 around but well past it’s heydey now surplus dried up and barrels shot out. Lots of 12gauge for wallaby too. Wallaby are hunted by hounds, spotlight and stalking. Suppressors are illegal unfortunately (ears currently ringing as I write this). Fairly commonly used with.22lr despite that of course. I’d love that AK104 set up like that. Sounds very practical and pleasant to use.

          • iksnilol

            Yeah, the AK-104 with a suppressor is practical. 12.5 inch barrel is ideal for 7.62×39 + a telescopic suppressor adds only like 4 inches to length. Doesn’t have to be specifically an AK-104 though, I just used that as an easy example. Best bet would be a RPK with shortened barrel and gas system due to the heavy barrel and receiver. My plan is a Vepr in 7.62×39, due to it being a RPK and because it is legal in Norway for hunting. Will have to permanently attach the suppressor so as to not break the law (minimum length has to be 33 inches) that also means I can’t have a folding stock because in Norway they measure the guns length in its shortest configuration (stock folded/collapsed, muzzle attachments off). Will probably get one of those adjustable Dragunov stocks.

            Here in Norway all semi autos are in theory banned, but a lot of them are exempted by default. Like pistols for competition, a list of rifles for competition and a list rifles for hunting (+ non-scary shotguns are exempted by default).

            Are pump rifles popular in Australia? I know those are quick to fire but I never use them.

          • Tassiebush

            That sounds awesome! Min length here is about 27 inches. There are some Remington 7615 and 7600 pumps as well as .22lr Winchesters, Remington, Taurus, Rossi and henry but centrefire pumps aren’t so popular down here. Seem to be more popular on mainland going by magazine ads. Lever actions filled the void left by semi autos much more than pump actions. I have a .22lr pump carbine that I use for wallaby. Very handy and fun plinker that slamfires if you hold trigger down which is fun. Good for taking along cutting firewood just for opportunistic hunting. I’d have a pistol for that if they were legal for hunting but it’s closest thing. With shotguns semi and pump are restricted to farmers who can prove genuine need for crop protection. They can get rimfire semi on same basis. Have to prove other action types wouldn’t suffice though. Hunters pretty much only have double barrels or if you can find it a Mossberg bolt action. Lever action shotguns have been available but appallingly unreliable.

    • Bubba

      I’ve seen it done by a guy on the weaponsguild forum.
      It seemed to work quite well after he adjusted the ejector to work with shotgun shells.

  • Bubba

    Am I the only one that would love to own one of these in .38 special?
    It would be pretty fukkin awesome with a can on the end of it.
    Real assassin-tier shit.

    • Wetcoaster

      You mean like a Thompson/Center Contender/Encore pistol?

      • Bubba

        Yeah, one of those in .38/357 with a can on it would be sweet.