Remington Model 700 Ultimate Muzzleloader

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Remington M700 Ultimate Muzzleloader

Power. Performance. And accuracy at 300 yards. When it comes to modern-day muzzleloaders, many shooters mistakenly take a “been there, seen that” attitude, but Remington’s Model 700 Ultimate Muzzleloader is truly unique; here’s why.

The Remington M700 Ultimate Muzzleloader is a top-tier in-line muzzleloader specifically designed to set new precedents in its field. Perhaps its greatest feature is the brass cases it takes, which are a unique size using a Remington 9 ½ large magnum rifle primer. Loading the brass case is a simple process: the shooter push-feeds it into the breech plug just like you load a rifle round into their Model 700 bolt-action chamber. This creates a gas seal in the flash hole at the primer; the primer is exceptionally hot, so it cleans the flash hole with each squeeze of the X-Mark Pro externally-adjustable trigger. After firing, the brass case is extracted and ejected in the same manner as from the M700 bolt-action. A simple process, and one far more user-friendly than the hassles created by those little 209 shotshell primers.

Remington Muzzleloader Boy Scout Range

I tried this muzzleloader out primed with a 200 grain magnum powder charge for impressive energy and a 250 grain bullet for one-shot stopping power. That bullet could actually be counted as one of its other nice features, because Remington’s sister company is Barnes, and their Spit-Fire T-EZ 250-grain muzzleloader bullets are 100% copper and have polymer tips for superior expansion. The cutting petals of these Barnes bullets provide rapid energy transfer and fantastic penetration, and having this Ultimate Muzzleloader providing the impetus, shooters have serious big-game knockdown capabilities. Firing the gun delivered the dynamic recoil one expects from such a bold rifle and, yes, you really can ring steel – or take down a bear – 300 yards out.

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When Remington claims this gun fires like a centerfire rifle, they’re both speaking the truth and making a bit of an understatement. The Ultimate Muzzeloader has good range and its stellar performance as a muzzleloader should give those centerfire rifles some healthy competition.

This gun uses Remington’s patented U.M.L. Ignition System, is capable of handling a 200-grain magnum charge – something that would utterly destroy a lesser muzzleloader, and delivers muzzle velocities up to 2400 fps and better. It can take loose powder or pellets, your choice, and is simple to maintain because it requires only normal barrel cleaning to clean the face of the plug. In fact, the breech-plug is also user-replaceable. Plus it has a faster twist rate than most other muzzleloaders for improved ballistic performance and trajectory stability. It comes in laminate and synthetic, both of which have a 26” stainless steel fluted barrel and X-Mark Pro externally adjustable trigger. The synthetic has a Bell and Carlson Medalist M40 stock and both style’s stocks offer storage: three extra primed cases can be stored below the receiver. When you buy an Ultimate Muzzleloader you get 24 primed cases and 24 projectiles, and the brass cases can be reprimed although they shouldn’t be for any other load.

Remington Model 700 Ultimate Muzzleloader

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Overall, Remington’s M700 Ultimate Muzzleloader is an advanced gun offering exemplary performance in its field and an aesthetically pleasing exterior. If you think there’s nothing new in muzzleloaders, take a look at this one. It doesn’t disappoint, and with it you can take advantage of many states extended muzzleloader seasons. Want a big, brash gun capable of taking down elk, moose, and bear? Give this one a shot.

Ultimate Muzzleloader Website



katie.ainsworth

Katie is an avid shooter, hunter, military journalist, and Southern girl. Firearms are her passion whether at the range or on a spot-and-stalk after a big buck. She’s a staff writer at The Firearm Blog and writes about guns, hunting, and the military for various publications both online and in print such as Outdoor Life, Handguns, and Shooting Illustrated. Shoot her a message at ainsworth.kat@usa.com


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  • Zachary marrs

    No

  • Gidge

    There’s no denying that it’s very impressive, buy why wouldn’t you just buy a normal Remington 700?

    • Robert V.

      Different hunting seasons I would guess.

      • Exactly, it is an additional deer tag…another chance to add meat to the freezer.

    • Bosch

      Hunting. Muzzle loader season opens earlier than rifle. You can use this like a 700, but a few weeks before a regular 700 would be allowed. A few weeks makes a big difference on Elk and Deer season.

    • Kat Ainsworth

      Bosch and Robert are absolutely right, using a muzzle loader enables you to take advantage of a longer season. And in some states, like Washington, it’s colder earlier and that affects when the game is easier to get, so having a muzzle loader for broader access can be extremely nice. Plus it’s just great to have some extra meat in the freezer, and it’s a different experience, too. It’s a powerful gun but it’s definitely different than the breech loaders we’re all used to.

    • Katie A

      Bosch and Robert are absolutely right, using a muzzle loader enables you
      to take advantage of a longer season. And in some states, like
      Washington, it’s colder earlier and that affects when the game is easier
      to get, so having a muzzle loader for broader access can be extremely
      nice. Plus it’s just great to have some extra meat in the freezer, and
      it’s a different experience, too. It’s a powerful gun but it’s
      definitely different than the breech loaders we’re all used to.

    • ManBear

      Deer Hunting. Alot of states you can only deer hunt with slug shotgun or muzzle loader

  • SD3

    Never done any muzzle loading, but I’ve always been intrigued with getting into it someday. Sounds like this system requires loading the primed charge before the bullet is ‘rammed’ down the barrel? Isn’t there additional inherent risk with that?

    • You are adding the primed case at the breech. The powder and projectile are still loaded through the muzzle. It is no different in that sense than any other in-line muzzleloader. Arguably, this design just makes it easier to prime than the systems using a shotshell primer.

  • Ken

    I’m assuming that they made the receiver different from a standard 700 receiver. Otherwise, the ATF would consider it a firearm.

    • You can’t load a standard cartridge. Here is the the patent that Remington licensed for their design.

      http://www.google.com/patents/US6385887

    • Dan

      Nope, it is a standard 700 receiver and thus requires an ffl for purchase.

    • Hudson

      Since it is a standard 700 can it use smokeless powder or do you still have to use black powder or Pyrodex type powders

  • Wetcoaster

    I had some trouble figuring if this was a review or ad-copy. Actually, I still do.

    • Hungo Strungo

      Same. No offense to the writer, but her reviews need more style and personality. This article seems like it was written by a robot.

      • Obviously it’s a review. It’s a well written review that got my ok as well as Steves. I don’t see that it lacks anything.

        • Zachary marrs

          A review? Could have fooled me.

          How accurate is it?

          Is it well put together?

          Is the action smooth?

          Is the trigger gritty?

          These details tend to be found in most gun reviews.

          I like reviews, not copy paste press releases

          • Nobody on the TFB staff does cut and paste period unless it’s a quote or excerpt from a story,article etc. then we use quotation marks to indicate it.
            One selling point was accuracy out to 300 yards. She couldn’t very well comment on that when the range we used was 100 yards max. It was accurate to the 100 yards we had. My observation was it’s a 700 basically and most people know what the action and trigger are like.
            You’re just nitpicking now.

          • Zachary marrs

            This isnt a review, this is a preview

            What if i don’t know what the 700 action is like?

            The trigger? So it shoots on its own like the other 700’s?

            But you’re right, basic details are too nitpicky to have in a review

  • I’m still having a hard time trusting Remington products – am I the only one?

    They’d really have to do something to pull me back in, and I mean more than a logo change, and new CEO. Proof. Solid proof their products aren’t going tits-up every so often.

  • sianmink

    First time I saw this I wondered how many times the proprietary brass could be reused and how available it’ll be 20 years from now.

    • Katie A

      It comes with a bag of 24 and you can reuse them quite a few times. You don’t need an extractor to remove them, either, they’re actually very easy to retrieve. Basically it’s not unlike when you reload spent brass for a breech loaded rifle, after a certain amount of use you’re going to see it can no longer be reused.I have not heard a specific number; it seems to be more a matter of assessing your brass as you use it.

    • It uses cut down .308 brass so it shouldn’t be a problem.

  • Mark N.

    There are details missing in these reviews by Katie. In this one, she tells us that the twist rate is different–well, some of us would like to know what the twist rate is, not just that it is “different.” In the two reviews by her, price is not mentioned, and that would be nice to know. Also, in all this talk about the new primer, there is not a single picture of either the holder or the breach–again details we would like to know.

    • $999 MSRP so figure $750 or so.

      Two
      Model 700 Muzzleloader Offerings in 2015

      Synthetic


      26” Stainless Steel Fluted Barrel


      Bell and Carlson Medalist M40 Stock with Primed Case Storage


      X-Mark Pro Externally Adjustable Trigger


      24 Primed Cases and 24 Projectiles


      Ships in a Hard Case


      MSRP – $999

      Laminate


      26” Stainless Steel Fluted Barrel with Rifle Sights


      Laminate Stock with Primed Case Storage


      X-Mark Pro Externally Adjustable Trigger


      24 Primed Cases and 24 Projectiles


      Ships in a Hard Case


      MSRP – $949

    • Katie A

      The twist rate on this is 1:26.

  • ManBear

    If Indiana wasn’t changing over to allow center fire rifle next deer season (thank the jesus) I might actually be interested in this…

  • Moose67

    “The
    Remington M700 Ultimate Muzzleloader is a top-tier in-line muzzleloader
    specifically designed to set new precedents in its field”

    wonder where the design concept came from, not a new idea.

    http://ultimatefirearms.com/index.php

    • Bill Brandon

      But at MUCH more affordable price from Remington.

  • boopie

    i would be more impressed if it had a magazine. so i can just cycle the bolt, dump powder, bullet, tamp it down, ready to go. no fooling with loose brass casings in cold weather with gloves on.

  • Rick

    a thousand dollar muzzleloader? Is it still considered a “primitive arm” for the purposes of extended season hunting?