dwavinchi sent us a photo of his Springfield Armory National Match M1A with a Sage EBR (Enhanced Battle Rifle) chassis / stock system installed and scoped with a Leupold 3-9x. The resulting rifle is not very dissimilar to the Mk 14 Enhanced Battle Rifle (and variants) used by all five branches of the US military.

Submit photos you have taken to TFB’s Photo Of The Day.



Advertisement

  • JumpIf NotZero

    So much heavy there! About 13lbs as shown? Good photo

  • WojtekimbieR

    Looks like something out of a video game!

  • DrewN

    I own a Springfield M21 and a Fulton, but for the money you would be paying to drop a tuned M1A action into a Sage, you would be better off with an AR10 IMO. Plus, it’s hideous.

  • Bought one for my M1A and sold it two weeks later. The weight wasn’t an issue so much as the balance and vertical play in the stock. Still a sweet picture, though.

  • sianmink

    Needs a can, a bipod, and a RDS on top of the scope.

    Also bunnies.

    • sianmink

      Don’t think too hard about their hearing protection.

      • Keith

        Well played sir.

    • Porty1119

      What am I seeing.

      • JumpIf NotZero

        Cat shit one

    • Seburo

      Japan needs to make more anime like Cat Shit One, Jormungand, & Ghost in the shell. Instead of otaku shit.

  • ColaBox

    My first thought. For the win.

    • ColaBox

      Disregard, picture didn’t upload. Great rifle though.

  • Taylor TX

    That thing sure is sexy, I wonder how heavy it ends up being with everything on it. Only thing I did notice was that the EBR chassis doesnt seem to go all the way to the handguard endcap for the original furniture (not an M1A owner)

  • J-

    That looks like it weighs 16 or 17 lbs

    • Bert

      When I weighed the EBR I was issued, it was 17.5 lbs with everything here and a harris bipod and a vertical foregrip with empty mag. This wasn’t very scientific, the scale could have been off, but it certainly was heavy.

      • J-

        I’ve heard they were heavy, and very front heavy (poorly balanced). Off the bipod they are accurate but humping one around all day is like humping around a SAW.

        • Mine isn’t as heavy. I just bought a plain surplus green stock and painted it.

          • J-

            I have two M1As, a Scout with an Aimpoint on low profile Burris rings and a “Loaded” with the Med Weight NM barrel and a 4-16 Nikon. With the factory fiberglass stock, they aren’t that bad. The Scout is not a bad gun to pack around the homestead at about 9 lbs. The Loaded is about 11 lbs decked out.

            The EBR looks cool, but the stock is machined billet aluminum. That is a lot heaver than the the standard sock, alone it is about 6 lbs. Take 11.5 lbs for the M21, remove the wood stock, add 6 lbs of aluminum, then a scope, and 15-16 lbs isn’t a bad estimate – 17.5 fully loaded seems accurate.

            The M1A is a great, reliable, accurate gun. But since it was designed in 1959, and based on the M1 designed in 1936, it really isn’t conducive to mounting optics. Systems like the EBR which attempt to fix that add a whole host of other problems, namely extra pounds.

          • DrewN

            Let’s not forget the wooden M21 stock with the adjustable comb is no lightweight itself. Has to be hands down the heaviest wooden stock I own.

          • Yea I did forget about that one and you’re right it’s a heavy stock for wood.

          • J-

            I know. Not just is it chunky but it is glass bedded too. You have to remember the history of the M21. It was developed as a snipe rifle (designated Sniper Weapon System) in the late 60’s. This was before the idea of free-float uppers and such had made their way to the AR-10 platform, and rigid, glass bedded stocks were what worked on bolt guns. Heavy was the only way of making a gun more accurate.

            That is my armchair commando thoughts on the EBR. The M14 is a great gun, but there are lighter ways of making a super accurate 7.62 rifle than taking a M1A National Match and bolting it to a $600 aluminum “chassis.”

          • n0truscotsman

            You are absolutely correct, especially your last paragraph.

            A M1a with this set up is, in fact, inferior to my LMT 308 in every conceivable way.

          • Heavy and expensive. I think I paid like $40 for that surplus stock.
            It is a great old gun that I sure enjoy shooting and working up loads for.

  • Mine isn’t as heavy. I just bought a plain surplus green stock and painted it. It’s actually a little lighter than using the wood stock.

  • USMC03Vet

    Rated DW for daddy wants.

    I got the vapors looking at that picture.

  • Secundius

    Anything known about the Shooting Mounting Rig. Like, who makes it and where can I purchase one…

    • dwavinchi

      it’s just a garage sale camera tripod screwed to the stock 😉

  • dwavinchi

    it’s similar to the one i carried in Afghanistan, heavy as crap, i had a peq-15 and surefire light mounted. i never used the bipod. it was around 17lbs.

  • derfelcadarn

    Looks great in an Arnold Schwarzenegger movie or mounted on a Humvee, but in the real world…

  • northafrican

    the m14 always a beauty

  • lifetimearearesident

    In my view the traditional walnut stock is best for this classic rifle. Might as well get an AR10 if you want maximum accuracy and the more modern look

  • Y-man

    Used to think “EBR” stood for “Evil Black Rifle”!

    LOL!

  • Pete Sheppard

    Thanks a lot, people…now my ‘Shoot My M1A’ itch is getting bad again…

  • st4

    I had built a similar setup using an M1A a pal sold me. Its boat anchor-like handling outweighed (literally) the coolness factor. Got rid of it and put the money towards a SCAR17S and never regretted it!

  • n0truscotsman

    Okay, here is the thing. Many are going to get feelings hurt, but this is the truth.

    The M14 EBR looks sexy as hell. Ill agree. You have the classic features of the M14 given a modernized, new age practicality with rails and heat gaps.

    The fact is that the desirability of this configured rifle as a fighting rifle (technically DMR, but whatever), decreases significantly when one actually has to carry and use it. Its a PITA to keep maintained and running properly. It is front heavy (especially with a PEQ15 and bipod, and heavy period. Last, but not least, you pretty much have to buy your own tools to properly clean and grease it.

    Just “wiping it down” wont do.