Trijicon ACOG Scopes with .300 AAC Blackout Reticles

ACOG Reticle Dimensions

Trijicon is now offering their 3.5×35 and 4×32 ACOG scopes with a BDC (Bullet Drop Compensation) reticle designed for the .300 AAC Blackout cartridge. The reticle is marked out to 600 yards for supersonic .300 BLK loads and 200 yards for subsonic loads. The diamonds drop markers are 2 MOA in width.

ACOG Drops

 

TA11-C-100414: Trijicon ACOG 3.5x35 Scope, Dual Illuminated Red Crosshair 300 BLK Reticle w/ TA51 Mount

TA11-C-100414: Trijicon ACOG 3.5×35 Scope, Dual Illuminated Red Crosshair 300 BLK Reticle w/ TA51 Mount

 

From the press release …

Wixom, MI — The 300 AAC Blackout cartridge has rapidly gained acceptance from the nation’s tactical, competition, hunting and personal defense communities. This extremely versatile cartridge is capable of providing both supersonic and subsonic velocities that result in vastly different performance characteristics. New for 2014, Trijicon has expanded its reticle offerings for the 300 Blackout in its most popular ACOG models, the 3.5×35 and 4×32. The 4×32 model will feature the Blackout reticle in both the tritium/fiber optic and LED versions.

The new 300 Blackout reticles are equipped with merged aiming points that are optimized for simplicity and efficiency. The supersonic BDC (out to 600 yards) has been merged with the subsonic BDC (out to 200 yards) to provide one set of aiming points for both types of ammunition. These reticles allow users to instantly switch between supersonic and subsonic ammunition without having to re-zero the optic. Additionally, these BDC reticles are not limited to one or two specific bullet weights; once properly zeroed, the majority of commonly available ammunition will fall within the 2 MOA diamond aiming points.

Utilizing standard 16-inch barrel velocities, the 3.5×35 and 4×32 300 blackout models have drops designed to be calibrated with both supersonic (110gr – 125gr) and subsonic (174gr – 240gr) ammunition. Zero the scope with supersonic ammunition at 100 yards using the center of the crosshair. The bottom tip of the crosshair serves as the 200 yard supersonic aiming point. The ballistic drop compensator (BDC) diamonds represent the supersonic hold-overs for 300 yds, 400 yds, 500 yds and 600 yds.

For subsonic ammunition, the diamonds serve as the aiming points for targets from 25-50yds, 100yds, 150yds, and 200yds respectively.

The drops (in MOA) for each aiming point are provided for users who wish to develop their own handloads, or for those who wish to deviate from the recommended zero distances or 16” barrel length.

For more information on Trijicon’s new ACOG 3.5×35 and 4×32 with 300 Blackout reticles, and the complete array of Brilliant Aiming Solutions™ for the hunting, shooting, military and law enforcement markets, contact Trijicon, Inc. ® at (248) 960-7700 or visit www.trijicon.com.



Steve Johnson

Founder and Dictator-In-Chief of TFB. A passionate gun owner, a shooting enthusiast and totally tacti-uncool. Favorite first date location: any gun range. Steve can be contacted here.


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  • David

    Unless the shooter is using ammo with the same velocity and weight as tested and in the same barrel length as tested, the data is useless. Why do they even make these bullet drop compensators?

    • m

      That shouldn’t be too hard for a subsonic .300 AAC. Most loads are simply the heaviest bullet possible (usually 220gr) loaded to a velocity that is just under the speed of sound.

      • Anonymoose

        >not using 240gr
        Pleb.

    • Mr.T

      BDC reticles are very rough as they might only hold true for one barrel ammo combo but in reality not even that but i guess for minute of barndoor they might work.

      • Anonymoose

        .300BLK velocity and accuracy is fairly consistent actually between 9-16. I would personally go for the 16″ because I compulsively like longer barrels. I have seen an 18″ by Wilson Combat, but according to AAC 16″ is where you’re going to get the maximum efficiency.

  • kawa

    I don’t get all of this hype. 300ACC is nothing more than a glorified 7.62X39 and I don’t see either of these cartridges a 600 + yard rounds

    • Jack

      So you’re not going to be getting one of these scopes then?

    • Paladin

      That’s because that’s not what they’re designed for. I could talk about how .45ACP sucks because it’s tough to hit at 200yds, but that’s not what the cartridge was designed to do.

      The .300BLK was designed to do three things, first to replicate 7.62x39mm ballistics in a cartridge better suited to the AR15 pattern rifle. Second, to create a cartridge that would perform well with a very short barrel (It is designed around a 9″ barrel and produces the same energy from that length as a 5.56×45 does from a 14.5″). Third to create a cartridge that suppresses well, capable of functioning with both super and subsonic rounds without the need to make any adjustments to the rifle. It has succeeded in all three.

      Also, Travis Haley has video of him making repeated hits on a man size target at ranges greater than 700yds with a 9″ .300BLK rifle.

      • erwos

        With all due respect to Travis Haley, that’s basically a parlor trick. Known distance means known holdover, which means point and shoot… albeit with a fair bit of practice.

        The problem with the whole .300AAC “shoot what you want” concept is that sub and super have two different zeroes. I cannot just interchangeably slap mags in my rifle without switching optics or adjusting my zero. This problem really removes a lot of the supposed advantages from that use case. If someone had an optic that could somehow switch preset zeroes with the push of a button (or flip of a lever), that would be optimal.

        • Paladin

          Did you read the article you’re commenting on? Yes subsonic rounds will have a different zero depending on the range the optic is zeroed at, but the only real difference is the drop which can be easily compensated for with the appropriate reticle zeroed for the right range. Additionally, subsonic rounds are primarily intended for use at close ranges, where the difference in trajectory is minimal.

        • RocketScientist

          “The problem with the whole .300AAC “shoot what you want” concept is that sub and super have two different zeroes. I cannot just interchangeably slap mags in my rifle without switching optics or adjusting my zero. This problem really removes a lot of the supposed advantages from that use case. If someone had an optic that could somehow switch preset zeroes with the push of a button (or flip of a lever), that would be optimal.”

          Hmmm… if only someone made an optic with a BDC reticle that was calibrated for both subsonic and supersonic rounds…. man, I bet Trijicon would make a killing with an optic like that. And then TFB would write a post about it, and some yahoo would post a comment about how .300 BLK is dumb because you need different zeros for sub- and supersonic rounds, and then some dead-sexy genius would make an almost-clever sarcastic reply about how thats exactly what the optic in that post does and…. ow, my head hurts

          • Dan

            That sounds exactly like what is going on right now! Except we need a dead sexy genius

          • RocketScientist

            🙁

    • As far as ballistics, they are extremely similar…only the 300 BLK is very reliable in the AR platform. As far as the 600 yard limit, see this video:

      300 BLACKOUT YEAR: http://youtu.be/tgKjbySsAi

  • JustinR

    Awesome. This is the optic I’ve been wanting for my .300 Blackout build.