Hyskore Compact Revolver Grip Light

hyskore_griplight-575x412

Hyskore, known for their shooting rests and hearing protection, has released a novel solution to mounting a light to a J-Frame revolver. The “Compact Revolver Grip Light” is a grip set replacement that incorporates a 130-lumen LED light onto duty-sized J-Frame systems.

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The light system module electronics and battery are all mounted in the grip replacement. The CRGL is a drop-on replacement to J-Frame grips.

The CRGL houses all electronics and a CR123 battery into the new grip assembly and mounts the light even with the sights on the right side of the gun to avoid hindering cylinder operation. TheĀ grip baseĀ die-cast aluminum with rubber inserts for comfort and recoil control.

The CRGL on the J-Frame. Note it adds some height to the bottom of the frame for the battery.

The CRGL on the J-Frame. Note it adds some height to the bottom of the frame for the battery.

The entire assembly adds 4.3 ozs to the revolver. Hyskore claims that the entire grip is a heat sink and “allows the light to be on for extended periods without excessive heat build-up.” The light is activated by a button on the front of the grip.

No word on pricing or availability.


Nathan S.

TFB’s resident Jarhead, Nathan now works within the Industry in Operations, Sales & Marketing. A consecutive Marine rifle and pistol expert, he enjoys local 3-gun, MSR’s, high-speed gear. Nathan has traveled to over 30 countries in the last three years working with US DoD & foreign MoDs. You will likely find him either in an international airport or on the local range in NE Indiana.

Nathan can be reached at [email protected]


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  • Hideous

    Go go gadget revolver light.

  • Tom

    I can appreciate the engineering behind this but is not the whole reason for a J Frame their small size and compact nature? So lets make it bigger by adding a light.

    • valorius

      An extra 4 oz of weight makes a j frame a lot more controllable with +p loads.

  • Paladin

    People still carry revolvers? Why?

    Everything a J frame can do a single stack 9mm can do better.

    • Bill

      Except shoot through a pocket, be used by people who may have strength issues that make racking a slide difficult, appreciate a simpler manual of arms, sit for years with no maintenance and still work….a lot of us carry both.

    • Dr. Daniel Jackson

      You’re right,a semi auto handgun can stovepipe better,FTF better,and nose dive better.

      • Paladin

        Revolvers have failures too, especially magnum calibres in small frames. Current miniature semi-autos are quite reliable.

        • Dr. Daniel Jackson

          Yes but revolvers fail significantly less,I personally carry a Glock 19 but I still know revolvers are less prone to failure of any kind,which is why I also carry a 7 shot .357 in my coat pocket.
          Not to mention you can’t fire an semi auto handgun reliably through a coat pocket or make a contact shot without pushing the slide out of battery.

          • Paladin

            The vast majority of semi-auto failures can be solved very quickly with appropriate training in immediate action drills like tap-rack-bang. And yes, you can make contact shots with a semi-auto, you just have to press the back of the slide to hold it in battery (side note, do not do this on straight blowback guns, you’ll get the mother of all slide bites). The same applies to firing from within a coat pocket, though TBH I can’t really think of a situation where that would be necessary.

          • Dr. Daniel Jackson

            In both of those situations you are preventing the gun from cycling(follow up shots are very important) you don’t have to worry about that with a revolver,shooting through a coat pocket can be very useful as my hands are usually in my coat pockets so if need be I can let loose 7 rounds without ever having to draw my weapon,that is FYI a huge tactical advantage.Having had a my sidearm jam on me in the middle of shootout in Afghanistan I know its not that simple the only reason I survived that day was because my squad mate shot the guy literally a millisecond away from shooting me.

          • Paladin

            I can draw and engage the target with aimed shots fast enough that I don’t particularly feel that firing unaimed shots from a jacket pocket would give me any sort of significant advantage.

            Frankly, we could “what-if” until the cows come home. One can always come up with a hypothetical, or even real world anecdotal situation where their favoured technology will beat the other. From my point of view the only thing that matters is total mitigated risk. The advantage of having more rounds available mitigates more risk than a slight increase in reliability. Simply put, limiting yourself to 5 rounds creates more risk than the slight increase in potential for failure in a semi-auto does.

          • Dr. Daniel Jackson

            Capacity doesn’t matter I could shoot a fly mid flight,relying on capacity over good marksmanship is a plan prone to failure.

          • Paladin

            It’s not an issue of relying on capacity over marksmanship. I never said anything of the sort. Marksmanship is important regardless of the type of carry gun one chooses. All else being equal having more bullets is better. First: pistol calibres are one and all underpowered, relying on a “one shot stop” is silly. Second: attackers do not play fair. There’s a good chance that there may be more than one of them, as such it behooves the sensible CCWer to have enough rounds to go around, and preferably to have extra, just in case.

            And you’re not going to get a whole lot of accuracy shooting through your jacket pocket.

          • Dr. Daniel Jackson

            Jacket pocket would only be used if there was no time to draw my glock and only to get a few shots off then draw my glock,I don’t rely on one shot stops I rely on weapons with histories of perfect reliability.The .357 also doubles as wilderness protection,but if im expecting bear I bring a .454.

          • Paladin

            To be sure having a backup gun is a good plan, but if your draw stroke is so slow that you need a second gun to be able to shoot through your jacket pocket you might want to rethink your carry system, not to mention carrying a gun in a pocket without a holster isn’t exactly safe.

            I also don’t think it’s a particularly good idea to have to choose between two guns before using them in a defensive encounter. Stress has a tendency to lock up the decision making process. It will most likely be faster to have a primary defensive firearm and practice your draw stroke with it to the point where it becomes automatic. Your backup gun should be just that, a backup, something you switch to if your primary is out of the fight, or alternatively something you can use to arm others who may need it.

            This also raises another issue with planning on firing from the jacket pocket, that is training. If you do not train a technique to the level of mastery there is a significant chance that you will not be able to perform it adequately under stress. Training to fire from your jacket pocket gets pretty expensive pretty fast, making it rather difficult to master the technique. Furthermore, how much does the positioning of your revolver shift in your jacket pocket? How much does it shift if you move vigorously or in unconventional movements, such as running, crawling or the like? If it’s not reliably in the same place every time that complicates your firing sequence, since you will first have to find the grip and get a proper hold on it when it may not be where you expect it to be. Conversely a proper holster will always keep your firearm in the same place regardless of how you move, which simplifies your draw stroke even in unconventional positions. Firing from a jacket pocket just plain isn’t the advantage it’s cracked up to be.

          • Dr. Daniel Jackson

            For wilderness protection .454 is great especial cause when I’m in the sticks it is usually in Alaska and I don’t really trust any handgun round below .454 to stop an Alaskan grizzly,the .454 is there though if I need more than my .338,also my draw stroke is fine but if for instance someone is pointing a gun at me I’m not going to draw my glock right away that leaves me wide open to be shot,hence the practicality of coat pocket carry,they wouldn’t see that one coming and if you want to win a firefight the element of surprise is pretty important.

            Just out of curiosity how do you carry?
            Personally I prefer using a Galco Miami Classic leather shoulder holster,mainly because for me it give me the fastest draw,though sometimes I like to carry IWB when I feel like carrying my 1911.(Colt XSE without rail,SS,converted to .400 corbon)

          • Paladin

            Unfortunately I’m in Canada and as such I cannot CC anywhere outside of a gun range. That said, I do practice when I can in the hopes that our right to do so will be restored in the future, as well as for home-defense scenarios and the times I do go stateside. For concealment I prefer an IWB kydex hybrid style holster at ~4o’clock.

          • dupkaman

            I don’t agree with your lack of respect for revolvers, but as a gun guy you are OK. Move to the southern part of the US and get your CC. We like guys like you. I’ll even buy you some Molson’s

          • Paladin

            I have lived in the states for a few years, and have considered moving there permanently, but I’d need a way to get U.S. citizenship, and the fight’s not yet lost up here.

          • dupkaman

            Good luck!!!

          • dan

            We need people like you fighting there. The more gun friendly countries the easier it will be at home.

          • dupkaman

            the 357 125 grain is touted as the best 1 shot man stopper…..a popular revolver round.

          • Paladin

            The .357 is formidable, but it’s no magic bullet, especially out of a short barreled J frame. A full house 125gr .357 out of a 1.875″ bbl gives about the same amount of muzzle energy as a +p 115gr 9mm out of a 3″ bbl pocket 9mm.

            There are also semi-auto equivalent calibres that give equal or superior performance to the .357 mag, .357 sig is a close match, and 10mm outperforms the .357 by a fair margin.

          • dupkaman

            I carry a larger barrel.

          • dupkaman

            686 7 shot?

          • Dr. Daniel Jackson

            Yes.

          • dupkaman

            great gun.

          • Dr. Daniel Jackson

            Heck yeah very accurate for having only a 2.5 inch barrel,the previous owner sent to a gunsmith too so the double action is buttery smooth and light at 6 pounds,single action is at 2 pounds,also it is cut for moon clips so reloads are pretty fast.

          • dupkaman

            I have the 5 inch pro series model. Accurate as hell right out of the box. Great looking barrel also. Single action trigger almost a bit scary.

          • dan

            Revolver and Autos have their own strengths and weaknesses and a time and place for you specific defensive needs. Proper training will help you determine which is more appropriate for a given circumstance, I carry both depending on the day.
            The subject of this article however is not about Autos vs Revolvers its about a fugly light that is going to cast a wicked shadow low and to the left and whether people are going to buy only to later end up hating it because there will be little to no holsters made to accommodate it.

          • dupkaman

            Failure of a round to fire in a revolver? Pull the trigger again, no tap-rack necessary. And catastrophic revolver failures are exceedingly rare and due to poor maintenance or firing an old revolver found in your grandfathers basement without proper
            evaluation.

          • Paladin

            Yes, revolvers have very low rates of failures, but a low failure rate is not necessarily a low stoppage rate. every gun out there stops shooting when it runs out of ammo. Revolvers, in general, run out of ammo faster than semi-autos do, and are more difficult to reload. There is a tradeoff here, you get 5 or 6 shots that are very reliable, and then have a complicated process necessary to get the gun back into the fight. A semi-auto may be slightly less reliable, but it has the potential to shoot many more times without any form of stoppage, and the stoppages it does have can generally be cleared very quickly and simply. A good semi-auto will give you more shots in between stoppages than a revolver, and that’s a fact. There’s a reason no modern police department or military issues revolvers anymore.

          • dupkaman

            You sound like my son, a Glock guy. It’s too tedious to go through this again with you.

          • Paladin

            Your son might just be right you know…

          • dupkaman

            You and he are both wise guys.

          • Paladin

            I get that a lot.

          • dupkaman

            Nothing wrong with that.

          • Paladin

            Nothing wrong with it at all :D

          • dan

            Cannot make a contact shot without pushing slide out of battery? Really? Which semi auto are you talking about? XD series (XDS excluded) you can, unless you are actually trying to use the gun to push the assailant off of you.

        • dupkaman

          Failures in revolvers are about as rare as truth coming out of Obama’s mouth. Most experts will tell you this.

    • G0rdon_Fr33man

      Congratulations, the most ignorant post in this thread-award goes to you…

      • Paladin

        Hmmm, let’s see, more bullets, faster reloads, slimmer profile, equivalent ballistics, and more than sufficient reliability.

        Yes, at one time the J frame ruled the concealed carry market, for many decades it was the only decently reliable gun in a respectable calibre that could be readily concealed, but that simply isn’t the case anymore. There’s a reason there are so many single stack micro 9mms on the market today.

        • vader

          It’s a personal choice. I own several semi-auto pistols in .45 and 9mm, but the guns at my bedside and my EDC are revolvers. I like the fact that if i am incapacitated, I can hand my revolver to my wife or whoever I am with and they can operate it quickly regardless of their weapons handling skills.
          .

          • Paladin

            If you’re planning on handing a weapon to a family member, they should at least be familiar with it. It doesn’t take a whole lot to familiarize someone with a semi-auto. If anything, I would prefer a semi-auto for an inexperienced shooter. Revolvers are difficult to reload, have limited capacity, and their long double action triggers take practice to master. A semi-auto on the other hand can have three times as many bullets before a reload is necessary, and can have much easier to control triggers.

          • Dr. Daniel Jackson

            Most revolver triggers aren’t that bad,they aren’t hard to reload either but the reload is definitely more time consuming unless you are using moon clips or speed loaders,now I could really see your point on the triggers being heavy if you have ever shot a Nagant 1895 revolver they on average have trigger pulls of 25-30 pounds making it not fun to shoot in double action,but I’ve felt worse on a semi auto pistol specifically the Detonics Pocket 9 the only reason I sold my detonics pocket 9 was because the trigger pull in double action was ridiculous the gunsmith measured mine at 37.4 pounds.

          • Paladin

            It’s very possible to learn to reload a revolver very quickly, one need only look up video of Jerry Miculek doing his thing to prove that, but reloading a semi-auto is easier, and even without reloading, that’s still significantly more rounds that are just a trigger pull away. If I or someone I care for has to fight for their lives I want them to have every possible advantage.

          • dupkaman

            In the vast majority of situations very few shots are fired. The capacity issue rarely comes into play. 7 or 8 shot revolvers are more than adequate….especially if loaded with defensive 357 ammo.

          • Paladin

            In the vast majority of cases no shots are fired, that doesn’t make it a good idea to carry an empty gun. If you are involved in a DGU it may end with no shots fired, it may end with only a couple shots fired, or it might take a lot more. The level of preparation necessary to feel comfortable varies from person to person, but having more bullets means you are better prepared.

            And if you’re going to carry a full size 7 or 8 shot .357 you could be carrying a full size semi-auto with 16 shots of 10mm, twice as many bullets in a more powerful calibre in a roughly equivalent size and weight package, that’s not a bad idea.

          • dupkaman

            The odds of needing the extra shots are very low. The odds the auto will jam are higher.

          • Paladin

            Therein lies the debate. I’m not so sure that it is as you say, especially with modern semi-autos and quality defensive ammunition. Numerous torture tests have been done, I’ve seen one where they fired 1,000 rounds through a G19 in 14 minutes. The recoil spring guide melted and flew out the end and the gun kept firing and cycling just fine. Modern semi-autos simply do not have the kind of reliability problems that would render them in any way unsuitable for defensive use.

          • vader

            That’s just it, I,we have no control who we are with when disaster strikes, nor can we force our family members to train as much as we’d like them to. It’s all very personal and dependent on individual circumstances. I have an AK, a couple of 12ga. pumps, an xd45, plus an assortment of 9mm pistols and I am proficient with all of them. I prefer having the revolvers always with me because in a panic situation anyone can just pull the trigger of a double-action revolver. Yes it does not take a long time to familiarize someone with a semi-auto, that is true, but in a true SHTF situation, you may not have even that couple of seconds to instruct your companion. My only point here is that I prepare for the absolute worst case scenario and for that a good revolver in a decent caliber, loaded with fresh factory ammo is my insurance policy. Now if it were just me handling the weapon, or if I could carry a primary and backup weapon, we are in complete agreement that a semi-auto would be the best choice :)

          • dupkaman

            Indeed. My wife learned to shoot my GP100 quickly. In a home defense situation, not having to think about the mechanics of a semi auto is paramount. Plus revolvers just look so good……with the exception of that Chiappa which only a mother could love.

    • Miami JBT

      As for why folks carry revolvers still? Because they work. I can fire my J-Frame from my coat pocket and not have it jam while my GLOCK 42 would.

    • dupkaman

      The J frame however, doesn’t have failure to feed or eject….meaning more reliable.

    • valorius

      Except fire round after round in a pocket or work for years on end without any cleaning/lube whatsoever.

  • USMC03Vet

    Old man tacticool.

  • BattleshipGrey

    I don’t like the placement. I know lasers have been put there before on snubbies, but obviously a light has to be bigger and more awkward. I think I’d rather see the light be placed under the crane and in front of the trigger guard, that way it’s still in line with the frame and easier to conceal. You’d still have to make/buy a new holster, but you would with this product too.

  • David

    Wow, a bit short sighted on the comments section, no pun intended (and I have no connection with the company in discussion.)

    Plenty of folks still trust J-frames, and this light is an interesting option. The negative is that it reduces the desired compact size. The positive: 130 lumens of light.

  • Mystick

    How to “un-compact” your $300 compact handgun, for probably around $100…

  • Miami JBT

    I very much am interested. I would like this for K and L Frame S&W Revolvers along with the Ruger GP100.

    As for why folks carry revolvers still? Because they work. I can fire my J-Frame from my coat pocket and not have it jam while my GLOCK 42 would.

    • dupkaman

      Yes, revolvers are more dependable and safer……and I think they look better especially compared to a Glock

  • J-

    Now make me one for my SP101

  • derfelcadarn

    Gun commandant NEVER point the weapon at anything you do not wish to destroy. Why would you put a light on the gun and then use it to look around ? I am hoping that the light shines where the gun is pointed otherwise what would be the purpose, but then you are pointing the weapon at unknown objects. Although it may be very useful these kind of lights violate the basic rules of firearm.

    • valorius

      Low,ready position + light = good illimumination.

  • valorius

    Very neat product