TAC-CON Media Event: Part 1: Factory Tour

_DSC2280

This morning we were all treated to a tour of one of the production facilities that TAC-CON uses to manufacture the components to make their trigger system.  Being an aerospace facility, the product that is being made is of the highest quality, and tightest tolerances.

_DSC2225

Also as part of the tour, we were each given a kit to assemble one of their triggers.  Included was all the parts needed to make a fully functional trigger system.  While at first a little daunting, assembly was actually easy.  Once assembled, we were walked through a function check of the trigger system.

 

What was released to us was a new ambidextrous safety selector that they will begin shipping with all triggers in the near future, with those that purchased triggers with a single sided safety the option to buy an ambi-safety from them.

_DSC2280

After the afternoon break we are headed to the range for hands on shooting with the trigger to get a better feel for how it is designed to function, what the functions are for and to get better at shooting with the trigger.

One part to the discussion this morning was the concept and thought process behind the trigger.  It was designed as a way to give people in a high stress setting a reset on the trigger and not get into the “death-grip” scenario, where they only fire one round.  The trigger is an auto-reset in the third position, forcing the user to reset the trigger for another shot.  The ability to rapidly fire the system was actually a side benefit to the way the reset system works, according the TAC-CON President Mike Stakes. This was actually to me, sheds a new light on the company and what they were looking to create for the firearms community and, at least to me, shed light on the reason they are being marketed to law enforcement as well.

This evening at the range should prove to be an exciting look into the function of the trigger system, how it works and getting used to using it.  Look for more this evening!

_DSC2231

_DSC2236

_DSC2241

_DSC2245

_DSC2251

_DSC2252

_DSC2260

_DSC2262

_DSC2268

_DSC2272

_DSC2275

_DSC2278




Sam Cadle

Sam Cadle is a prior service member from the US Coast Guard, and has extensive firearms training from the military. He spent many years working counter narcotics in Central America and working maritime law enforcement and anti-terrorism stateside. He has also written articles as guest writer that are published on The Truth About Guns, and other firearms related blogs. He is currently a successful writer for Examiner.com, specializing in gun rights and politics in Washington State, as well as across the United States. His passions are long range precision shooting, coyote hunting and keeping up with the firearms community.

To get a hold of Sam you can email him at [email protected], or via Facebook here.


Advertisement

  • Bart

    Im guessing the manufacturing facility is in Phoenix. Do you recall where?

    • http://www.thefirearmblog.com/ Phil W “Senior Writer TFB”

      He’ll be back online later. The website doesn’t list an address.

    • http://thefirearmblog.com/blog/ Sam Cadle (Staff Writer, TFB)

      It’s in Phoenix, but kept under wraps as to exactly where. There are several facilities around the city associate with them though.

    • Andrew

      Back room of a Los Pollos Hermanos.

  • dp

    Are they chewing those bits out of block; it looks that way? I know it has become quite popular lately since CNC machining is widespread. But oh, I hope not, that would be time and material inefficient. MIM or invest cast is more meaningful and conventional way of doing it, but true it requires tooling. Well, at the end there must be a customer willing to pay for it.

  • Cymond

    Sam, you may want to proofread this sentence
    “This was actually to me, sheds a new light on the company and what they were looking to create for the firearms community and, at least to me, shed light on the reason they are being marketed to law enforcement as well.”

    But I get what you’re saying. I still find it strange that these got so much hype back in November-ish, but that this is the first I’ve heard of any intent other than rapid fire. Their early marketing was ALL about simulating full-auto.