Ares Armor Releases 80% AR10 Lower

AR10

Ares Armor has released their 80% lower that are SR25/DPMS patterned.  They are on sale right now on their site for $99.  Unlike a finished receiver, an 80% lower is not required to be shipped to an FFL because to the ATF, it is not a firearm until the final 20% of the mill work is completed by the user.  Once completed, the user can purchase a parts kit, and complete the lower for a fully functional large frame AR lower.

The challenge to the 80% lowers can be finding a mill to complete the lower on though.  Ares Armor sells a jig with templates for each of the processes that the end user needs to complete in order for the lower to function.  I know some have used a simple drill press and had good success, while others have not only failed, but irreparably damaged the lower.  There are also companies that will hold meetings where they will help you set up their mill, and as long as you push the green button the lower is still yours, for personal use, and not subject to being serialized.  So if you are looking for a challenge for you next AR build, you might just start by making your own lower from an 80%.

For more information, http://aresarmor.com/store/Item/TACMHDM8

Like all of our products we hold them to the tightest tolerances and stand by them for life. The operations left to be completed are as follows/ fire control group, trigger pin, hammer pin, trigger slot and safety selector. This is a not an FFL item. This is not a complete receiver and still requires machining to be done. We have a copy of our ATF determination letter and our determination update stating that it is not a firearm.

Technical drawing to show the cuts needed to make the lower 100% functional.




Sam Cadle

Sam Cadle is a prior service member from the US Coast Guard, and has extensive firearms training from the military. He spent many years working counter narcotics in Central America and working maritime law enforcement and anti-terrorism stateside. He has also written articles as guest writer that are published on The Truth About Guns, and other firearms related blogs. He is currently a successful writer for Examiner.com, specializing in gun rights and politics in Washington State, as well as across the United States. His passions are long range precision shooting, coyote hunting and keeping up with the firearms community.

To get a hold of Sam you can email him at [email protected], or via Facebook here.


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  • wetcorps

    Dali would be proud :)

  • Matt

    Buyer beware, read the company reviews before you buy anything from Ares Armor.

    • http://www.thefirearmblog.com/ Phil W “Senior Writer TFB”

      Elaborate a bit if you would. Do you have some links I could have a look at?

    • JohnComeau

      or just go there in person. after all, if you’re going to build an unserialized weapon, you probably don’t want your digital fingerprints all over it. Oceanside is a nice town, except for all the goddamned Marines everywhere :^P

  • http://www.thefirearmblog.com/ Alex C.

    I would love to replicate an old school dutch AR10 with one of these!

  • Robert Christianson

    I have ordered from ares armor on multiple occasions and have had my order delivered in a quick and orderly manner. No problems here I would order from them again.

  • gunslinger

    I thought that “renting/using” a pro’s mill was a no-no from the ATF

    • Mark N.

      Apparently the ATF has warned owners of CNC mills that allowing customers to mill a lower simply by pushing a button on a pre-programmed machine will be considered by the ATF to be the manufacturing of firearms by the mill owner. Further, as I understand it, this pretty much put an end to such practices overnight. If you own a mill and do one for yourself, you are still GTG, and those without a mill can still use a drill press and a good jig. I speculate that if you could do the programming yourself, you could still rent a mill and thus comply with the law.
      The other option is the polymer 80% lower. The one I bought can be completed with hand tools, although a drill press would make it a lot easier and cleaner, and no jig was necessary. As soon as the fire control group arrives, I will have an official “Senator DeLeon Special.”

      • gunslinger

        i can understand now if CNC “renters” have a pre-programed routine and all you do is hit start. but if you can “write” your own routine or manually operate a mill i don’t see how there’s a problem. but i’m not in the law, so i can’t say for sure.

        thanks

        • BryanS

          My take on it was if you are using their code and jigs, that is still them doing the remaining 20%.

          I rent out space in a shop in Pittsburgh that has a 4 axis mill, and if I wrote the code and ran the part, that would be my own creation.

          Now I wonder if you start form a billet blank from a downloaded g-code, how does that work?

          • gunslinger

            i bet it’d still be a no-go. although neither the renting or coding party couldn’t be fully responsible, as the mill isn’t using their own code, and the coder is nothing more than a set of “blueprints”.

  • joe

    except these are in stock and ready to ship.

  • BryanS

    They need someone on staff to take photos and do graphics in something other than MS word. Ares, if you are listening, my graphic design services can be had inexpensively ;)

    • Chris Bryan

      I’d do it for a lower! :)