KynSHOT Recoil Dampers

KynShot_HomeGraphic

KynSHOT debuted their new hydraulic recoil dampers late last year. According to KynSHOT they help reduce recoil, bolt carrier speed, wear/tear on parts, shock and vibration to your optics, improve reliability and suppress bolt bounce. The drop-in buffer features a hydraulically dampened piston that absorbs the shock from the bolt carrier. The KynSHOT is made out of 17-4 stainless steel and weights in at 4.2 ounces. It’s available for fixed stock and collapsible AR-15s, .308 ARs with fixed and collapsible stocks as well as various shotgun platforms. It can be used in rifles chambered in .223/5.56, 7.62×39, 6.8 SPC, .300 BLK, 6.5 Grendel, .458 SOCOM, 450 Bushmaster, and .308/7.62. The KynSHOT also comes with a 10 year or one million round warranty. They start at around $110, check them out at Kynshot.com.

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Ray I.

Ray is an online marketer who got his start in the auto industry taking pictures and writing about cars. A long time gun enthusiast and blogger, his daily firearms musings can be found over at his gun blog ArmoryBlog.com.


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  • http://www.thefirearmblog.com/ Phil W “Senior Writer TFB”

    I’ll be writing a review on this buffer in the near future.

    • http://rumblestripradio.com rumblestrip

      Maybe a side by side with the JP Silent captured spring?

      • http://www.thefirearmblog.com/ Phil W “Senior Writer TFB”

        I’ll have to think about that one. I hadn’t planned on a comparison review.

        • http://rumblestripradio.com rumblestrip

          All good, I just noticed a similarity and thought it might be something worth looking at. I do look forward to your review.

  • MacK

    Did they buy Endine/L3′s IP Portfolio or just replacing their loss on the markplace?

  • John

    Why stop at a million rounds? Why not a 1 trillion round warranty?? Like there’s a difference.

  • claymore

    Anyone flinching from the recoil of an AR-15?????????

    • gunslinger

      i think it’s more for competition to help reduce movement?

      • http://www.thefirearmblog.com/ Phil W “Senior Writer TFB”

        It certainly would perform that function. It would be very useful in competition.

    • allannon

      Sure; not everyone is a 170+ pound male. I have a slightly softened recoil on mine, and it’s still pretty harsh for some new shooters.

      As well, even if you’re recoil-tolerant, it still imposes muzzle rise; a few fractions of a second trimmed off can matter in competition.

      • BOB

        This must be subjective. My 12 year old sister, who weighs less than 80lbs, shot my 16 inch ar for the first time and was knocking down pop cans with not difficulty using my RDS. The recoid didn’t seem to bother her, supporting the barrel was more challenging but she got it done.

        • allannon

          It is, no doubt. I’ve seen short, petite women with more recoil tolerance than their taller, beefier husbands.

          In general and IME, heavy people have more recoil tolerance than light people, same in shape/out of shape, but I think if there were a way to quantify it there would be a distinct but loose trend.

      • JLR84

        I didn’t need to transition from a standard M4gery with a carbine length gas system and a standard weight buffer, to a mid-length gas system and a heavy buffer, but I’m still glad I did.

        That said I think I’ll draw the line at a $110 hydraulic buffer. Maybe if the thing catches on and proves reliable after five years or so, but I’ll let others beta test the thing.

        • nova3930

          No doubt. I fail to see what this does that can’t be accomplished cheaper with a middy and heavier buffer. If you want even more, switch to an A5 system…

    • derfelcadarn

      Just another place to whiz away money. Like all the BS you can stick on the out side of these guns. The more bangles and do-dads the more things to go wrong. Practice practice practice ! These aren’t rifles in 505 Gibbs. Guns have recoil deal with it. If you make the first a good one followup shots become far less important.

    • ColaBox

      I have actually seen people flinch from it, two years back a women fired her husbands and it literally knocked her on her ass. I never thought id see the day and the look on the range masters and husbands face said the same.

    • Dan

      this product is for competition. you wouldn’t understand.

      • claymore

        YEA right I will bet you a box of ammo that I have fired more rounds in competition than you.

  • DrewN

    I have an Endine in my Beowulf. Never noticed the slightest difference from a standard buffer to be honest.

    • guest

      That’s because it slows the bolt down, and does NOT slow the buffer down as it impacts the rear of the buffer tube.

  • patrickiv

    Looks pretty fragile compared to regular buffer. I look forward to the review.

    • http://www.thefirearmblog.com/ Phil W “Senior Writer TFB”

      Thanks—as soon as I get it I’ll start using it.

  • DO NOT BUY

    To understand how, why and in what specific case there is a need for these (and similar) buffers that retard the speed of the bolt, one must understand how the AR pattern rifle works. These buffers slow the bolt down NOT as the buffer it impacts the rear of the buffer tube, but as the bolt starts its motion rearward. This means that the ENTIRE unlocking and extraction process will happen at a slowe bolt velocity. In effect if the rifle is over-timed or over-gassed this type of buffer will decrease bolt velocity by converting kinetic energy to heat in the oleo strut, but this ALSO reduces bolt velocity during extraction and may render the rifle useless (a manual repeater). This is due to the bolt moving back much slower and potentially not going back all the way, and causing a FTE, FTF or both.
    For the vast majority of shooters a buffer that slows the bolt down gently just as it is about to impact the rear of the buffer tube would be optimal, since that is the moment when the recoil energy from the carrier group and buffer is transferred to the rifle and felt by the shooter. I have yet to see a company that would pull their heads of their rear ends and produce just such a buffer.
    In short – unless you believe in luck or you know exactly why *your* rifle needs this buffer, don’t buy it. It is so much more than a simple drop-in component.

  • TyroneAlfonso

    “According to (insert manufacturer here)” = I have no idea if this is a POS or not but we’re telling you to check them out = an ad pretending to be an article.

    • http://www.thefirearmblog.com/ Phil W “Senior Writer TFB”

      You didn’t notice I posted I would be testing it in the near future. You’ll get details then. We don’t do ads. This would be what you call an announcement of a new product.

      • Luis Cabrera

        Doesn’t say so in the copy.

      • TyroneAlfonso

        This may not literally be an ad but it might as well be. How’s that review coming along?

      • TyroneAlfonso

        Still waiting…. LIAR WHORE LIAR WHORE AND YOU KNOW IT!!!!!

  • Sulaco

    I remember trying the buffers a few years ago that used liquid mercury and found they made Glocks for instance a lot less reliable. Will wait for a review by somebody I trust before using something like this me thinks…