DRD Tactical M762 Takedown Rifle, New for 2014

M762-hardcase

While takedown rifles in .22 and even .223 are becoming the norm, DRD Tactical has announced a takedown rife in .308 that is new for 2014 called the M762.  A SR25/DPMS patterned lower, the M762 will accept Magpul P-mags.  With a less than a minute assembly time, the rifle could become a good option for hikers, or even hunters that might want to carry their rifle stowed on the hike in.  Having the option of a .308 takedown rifle would be a major plus for those looking at targets that might take the extra power achieved with the .308 round.

Press Release from DRD Tactical:

DRD Tactical announces new for 2014 Model M762 Rifle, a quick takedown, semi-automatic rifle chambered in 7.62 NATO, which can be assembled from its hard-case or back-pack without any tools, in less than a minute. The M762 is built on billet lower and upper receivers, uses standard Magpul 308 Pmag or DPMS pattern metal magazine, comes with a MIL-STD 1913 Picatinny 13″ Rail with mounting holes on 3 sides for Magpul L-4 Rail Panels. Comes standard with 2-20rd Magpul Pmags, small hard case with custom cut foam, 13″ QD Rail, FN Hammer Forged 16″ 7.62 NATO chambered barrel and Magpul Stock and Grip. Please visit www.drdtactical.com for more information.

MSRP $3250

M762_main


Sam Cadle

Sam Cadle is a prior service member from the US Coast Guard, and has extensive firearms training from the military. He spent many years working counter narcotics in Central America and working maritime law enforcement and anti-terrorism stateside. He has also written articles as guest writer that are published on The Truth About Guns, and other firearms related blogs. He is currently a successful writer for Examiner.com, specializing in gun rights and politics in Washington State, as well as across the United States. His passions are long range precision shooting, coyote hunting and keeping up with the firearms community.

To get a hold of Sam you can email him at [email protected], or via Facebook here.


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  • Jack Morris

    I suppose it saves some room by keeping the receiver on the lower while transporting, but wouldn’t it be more cost effective and simpler to stagger a normal 16″ AR-10 in a slightly larger hard case?

    This seems like a very expensive solution to a “barely” problem. The AR pattern rifle is pretty much a “take-down” rifle by design.

    • burkefett

      With the added benefit of keeping the optics or sights and the barrel they’re zeroed for physically attached.

  • MOG

    How much is the rifle without the case?

  • iksnilol

    We all know why we want this (especially with a thread on suppressor). We all want to do the cool assemble-the-rifle-before-taking-the-shot sequence you see in so many movies.

    • wry762

      YES!

      …except I don’t see available space in the case for a 7.62 can, or an optic.

      .

    • LCON

      DRD tactical, Soon to be Hollywood’s best friend.
      I suppose it could also be used by someone who is working in a very compact area of storage or cargo for whom simply breaking down the receiver would not be enough.

  • Mitch

    This is revolutionary, gents. They put an AR… in a case!

    • schizuki

      And it separates into… two halves!

      • Weeeeiiiirrrrrd

        And they are going to charge you $3250.00 for this amazing, never been done before feat of engineering.

        Sounds like another company I know… something… with… an… H… and… a K… Hmmmmmm… Strange.

  • schizuki

    Ummmm… Takedown rifles in .223 have been the norm since Eugene Stoner invented the AR-15 fifty years ago.

    • Giolli Joker

      And already 60 years ago breaking apart a .308 rifle wasn’t that hard too (FN FAL).

      • JefftheSwede

        Almost 60 years even in an AR platform, as Stoner actually designed the AR-10 first, submitting it for trials in 1956.

        • itsmefool

          That’s right, Jeff, but hardly anybody seems to know or remember it!

  • BOB

    The AR already has ‘takedown’ pins, I can fit my AR pistol with an A1 buffer, into my laptop bag when I separate the upper and lower.

  • RickH

    Is DRD under the assumption that people/customers don’t realize that the upper & lower receivers of an AR pattern rifle can separated?

  • Hikerguy

    Reminds me of the take-down rifle the navy had made a couple of years back. An answer to a question that was never asked.

  • ColaBox

    So…its a fancy suit case?

  • 360AD

    Amazing how many commentors are bitching about DRD separating an AR in two halves. Do a little more reading online and it would be immediately apparent that DRD system is more than upper and lower halves in a hard case. What’s significant is the ability to attach and detach or swap barrels quickly sans tools. Overly expensive, yes. But, separating the halves is only the packaging and not the central selling point of DRD’s product.

    • BOB

      I see the point now, I’m going to the range, grab my range back and as I’m approaching the parking lot, a thought hits me: Did I grab my blackout mags or my 5.56 mags??? OH TEH NOZ!!! I grabbed the wrong mags, never fear, I have my $3.5k DRD breakdown rifle, now I can swap out the wrong barrel for the right one and a day at the range was not wasted. :D

    • schizuki

      Well, 360AD, when a company writes a press release that deals exclusively with how awesome it is that their rifle takes down, people will tend to respond to that.

  • PatrickPM

    I’ve always liked takedown rifles because its fun to pretend you’re a super secret agent on a mission.

    “These orders are straight from the top”

  • itsmefool

    At least DRD is using SR-25 mags!