First Review of G2R R.I.P. Ammo is on YouTube, Interesting Results

G2 Research’s Radically Invasive Projectile “R.I.P.” has a fantastic marketing campaign, generating lots of buzz. Our own post has over 144 comments debating the effectiveness of the ammunition. Steve sums it up nicely:

“The company claims its 96 gr copper bullet is “the last round you will ever need”. The design is inspired by a triangular tipped surgical tool called the Trocar. It has 8 segmented spikes which break off as the bullet enters its target, while the solid base continues on its original trajectory.”

ShootingTheBull410 has posted the first video review (above) of the new ammunition to YouTube using ballistic gel. If you have not seen his reviews before, ShootingTheBull is known for his pursuit of the perfect “Pocket .380” ammo reviews (and now evaluating 9mm). For those who have not seen the tests, I recommend you take a look.

The trocars do break off the base as advertised, but the wound track is small compared to conventional HP ammunition. Combined with the feeding issue in a Glock 19 (!), the results are disappointing compared to the hype.

Still, the round does showcase the likely future of high-performance ammunition. Using CNC machines to shape bullets has huge potential compared to current casting technologies. I look forward to seeing what they come out with next after multiple reviews and real-word AARs provide valuable feedback.

Steve Says: Phil White has been trying to obtain RIP ammunition for TFB to test. He has emailed the company, he has left voice messages. We have not heard back from them.


Nathan S.

One of TFB’s resident Jarheads, Nathan now works within the firearms industry in weapon design, operations, and sales. A consecutive Marine rifle and pistol expert, he enjoys local 3-gun, MSR’s, & high-speed gear. Nathan has traveled to over 30 countries working with US DoD & foreign MoDs. He loves tinkering, gunsmithing, NFA, and MSRs.

Nathan can be reached at Nathan.S@TheFirearmBlog.com


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  • Heylighen Maxime

    R.I.P. : Rest In Pieces !

    Must be done.

  • Christian Hedegaard-Schou

    What do you mean by “current casting techniques”? Modern bullets are overwhelmingly formed via drawing and swaging techniques.

    • Typically, the lead is cast in molds (or swaged) prior to having the jacket drawn over the mold. While effective for circular shapes and minor deformations, casting and drawing is not particularly effective with sharp angles, which are either hard to produce or require more machines or machine steps (thereby increasing costs). New bullet technologies are using single material or alloys and then CNCing them into sharp angles for more cutting/faster expansion/aerodynamics, etc. CNC’d bullets give the manufacturer/designer more options on bullet shape in single CNC operations.

      • guest

        CNC stands for “computer numerical control”.

        Monometal bullets are *lathed* with CNC lathes, not “CNC’d”, which is also wrong because it’s witten without the apostrophe – “CNCd”.

        Pretty poor for a member of the blog staff if you ask me.

        Best regards from a non-native english speaker.

        Ps:
        Berger is a world-renowned company, and they swage all their bullets as far as I know. Swaging, stamping and metal-powder forging were and still are the most effective (and if need be very accurate) production methods. Whatever “new bullets” you speak of were and will remain a niche product, completely overshadowed by swaging. For handgun bullets even more so.

        • Sincerely appreciate the lesson on CNC terminology. I understand the machine operations, but have not written about it in detail before. It is good to know for future articles.

          You are correct, most monometal bullets are lathed (often without computer assistance, using a template). Unlike most monometals, the RIP is CNC milled to get the shape required. The additional axis gives designers finer control and more options for bullet shape than 2-axis lathes.

          I also concede that swaging/cast bullets will continue to make the bulk of rounds for the foreseeable future (economics dictate that current technologies are less expensive), but I hope to see more CNC milled bullets in the long term. With CNC mills, you can get finer details and more intricate shapes than swaging/casting and drawing allow.

          The RIP is a solid first step in that direction. It shows the potential of milled bullets, but sadly did not live up to the hoped execution.

          • dan citizen

            Great response! Mature, flexible, respectful. The strong ethics and professional behavior of TFB staff is much of why it’s a great site.

          • We thank you!

          • Aurek Besh

            I just can’t see milling and turning replacing swaging/casting/stamping, apart from specialty low-volume rounds (eg, match ammunition) or prototyping, both of which they are already in use for. Even screw machines (a machine for high-volume production of small, simple parts) will easily get outpaced 100 to 1 by dedicated ammunition production equipment. CNC manufacturing may be fast, but it is best suited to producing complicated parts that would otherwise require lots of fixtures and operations.

          • Giolli Joker

            This shows much better that potential:

            (Less hype, way better results)

          • That’s going to make a mess

          • Giolli Joker

            Pretty scary indeed…

          • guest

            Any machining operations will never replace stamping, swaging and forging. That is just a truth one has to hold as self-evident after all these years of technological advancements. There are for obvious reasons parts of various manufacture that can not exist if it wasn’t for machining operations, but bullets are just not one of them. Especially handgun bullets.
            All these intricate shapes, these exotic bullet designs… none one of them has shown any significant advantage except perhaps monometal bullets for rifles at long range, and I speculate that even that is because of failure to understand that swaging changes metal density while machining does the same but to a negligeable degree.

            You say RIP is a step in that direction… did you miss the whole youtube part about it being nothing special? It holds no serious advantages what so ever compared to “regular” hollowpoints, while it costs an arm and a leg. This is a hyped up firearm world answer to the “exclusive” Voss bottled mineral water – nothing special other than a high price tag.
            And by the way that pre-fragmenting – totally doable with swaging/stamping, but for a good reason every other manufacturer makes “regular” bullets: this design holds no significant improvement. A hollywood gimmick… probably the only place this product will end up when the hype blows over.

  • Jeff Smith

    “Feeding issue in a Glock 19” – Yea, that’s pretty bad. There’s a reason why most reputable ammo manufacturers keep the jacket of their bullet smooth.

    I don’t know if I’m more disappointed with the results or impressed with the effectiveness of a couple of shots from a .22.

    • Jeff Smith

      Also, it says a lot when a company claiming to have a revolutionary product won’t get back to a reputable site that’s eager to test their product.

    • bbmg

      A subsonic 40 grain 22LR bullet can penetrate more than the regulation 12 inches of ballistic gelatin, there is no doubt that it can be lethal if it hits the right place.

      A 22LR to the brain will likely kill you instantly, a .454 Casull to the leg will not. We spend far too much time thinking about “terminal effectiveness” when shot placement should be the number one concern.

      • Whoa not so fast guy. I’ve worked a shooting where the guy was shot in the leg and died. It went nuts and traveled up the leg to the heart.
        I’ve also seen a 45 230 ball go through a guys right eye and not exit but he lived. You never know.

        • bbmg

          … hence my use of the word “likely”, there will always be freak cases but I think we should be talking about probability.

          A 230 grain FMJ 45 bullet will penetrate more than 2 feet of ballistic gelatin at close range:

          http://www.lignod.com/m1911ball.jpg

          If it didn’t exit someone’s head, it must have been a hit from some distance away or after penetrating several barriers.

          • No the docs said it went in at a slight angle after going through the eye then skirted around the brain between the skull and brain.
            He walked funny after that and had speech problems but he was fully functional otherwise.
            The guy with the 22 in the leg just had a bad day. I mean geez ricochet off the tibia and go up clipping the heart!

          • OldNorthState

            “…Yeah, and he was a slow walker, too… after that bull hooked him.”

            Pea Eye Parker, “Lonesome Dove”, 1989 ~

  • Harrison Jones

    I have a feeling this will still be a winner sales wise. I don’t think I will buy any though.

  • Ben Wong

    its like the glaser safety slugs remember them lol

  • sianmink

    They’ll be just like Liberty CD (since they do the exact same thing). lots of buzz and some good early sales, then nothing, then clearance discounts.

  • Well I have to say I’m not surprised. Pretty close to what I thought they would do.

  • Beju

    Gimmick ammo is gimmicky.

  • dan citizen

    I am going to avoid buying RIP ammo as soon as possible, and I am really looking forward to never shooting it in my guns.

  • Anton Gray Basson

    What is it that they say about fishing lures? Most of them being designed to catch fishermen and not fish. I think it applies to a lot of firearm accessories and rounds.

  • bbmg

    Not a very impressive review. Some comparison with existing expanding 9mm ammunition would have been more credible,

    In any case, this video posted on the original TFB entry says it all really: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXwPtP-KDNk

    If your aim is switching off your target, it would appear you are better off with a smaller caliber high capacity pistol that gives you a greater chance of striking the central nervous system than fiddling with wunderkugel.

    • Giolli Joker

      The review wasn’t meant to be a comparison but a quick first evaluation of a product marketed with so much hype…
      Check the work of ShootingTheBull on .380 rounds for an example of his scientific approach to an ammo comparison. 😉

      • bbmg

        Looks like “jumped the gun” 🙂

  • mike cumpston

    regardless of whether or not they work, a new I.D.A.K (Instant Destroyer And Killer) bullet is needed on a regular basis if for no other reason than to upset the liberoids and sissy-nazis.

  • Dong Blak

    R.I.P.O.F.F.

  • tinacn

    When it comes to civilian personal defense ammunition, I (and many others) have always thought it most unwise to carry any ammunition that is NOT used as duty ammunition by at least one local law enforcement agency in your area. Ammunition with names like “Zombie Killer” and R.I.P. (obviously a double entendre for Rest In Peace), while sounding “sexy and effective” to the firearms community, would only provide a hostile prosecuting attorney with another “point” he could make with a jury should you find yourself on trial for a “deadly force action”; to wit: “Well, Mr. Jones, why did you feel it necessary to carry these unusual, super-deadly, bullets intended for Zombies in your pistol? Did you think you needed DEADLIER bullets than what our police use in order to be certain you KILLED anyone that looked at you wrong, such as the young and innocent ?!” Same thing applies to reloaded ammunition that you “cooked up in your Devil’s Workshop in order to torture your victim…” I fully appreciate technological progress, marketing strategy, and even the bright colors used on the boxes and in the bullet tips, but until “the cops” carry them as duty ammo I would not carry them for defensive use.

    • micko77

      Hhhmmm… I made a like-minded comment at The Washington Times article about keyboard commandos bragging about what they would do, with the intent to dissuade folks from courtroom blowback…. I was soundly thrashed. I sleep well, though.

      • tinacn

        Thank you for the support. I have a son who is a courtroom deputy in a gun-friendly Southern (sort of) State, and based on his experience with juries, he has told me I am correct in my position. So many of our Brothers-in-arms seem to think that if they are ever involved in a self-defense shooting, everyone on the law enforcement side will praise them for “taking out a low-life” or some such foolishness, and refuse to believe that they might actually end up in a courtroom fighting for their life with a $500 an hour lawyer to pay. Pity, that. A great source for information on the REALITY of a self-defense action is http://usconcealedcarry.net. Check it out.

  • gunslinger

    ok review. would have liked to see more fire testing, then just saying hey, it didn’t work in my G19. (but on G2s web it worked in a full auto glock???)

    anyway, maybe this round should do a deathmath with that 4 projectile kevlar string round the Multiple Impact Bullet

  • LRB

    I dont get these hyper velocity gimmick rounds. Since when did modern jacketed hollow points become ineffective enough to warrant cnc milled tocarded wonder round? I’ll just stick with my Federal HST’s.

    • big daddy

      Federal HST is the best.

  • Georgi Zhukov

    Even their own gel test (which doesn’t look to me like properly
    calibrated ballistic gelatin, but Perma-gel or something similar) shows
    it to be a substandard performer. It is obvious that this company is
    simply preying on people who are completely unfamiliar with wound
    ballistics and fall for the “neat-o!” aspect of this ammunition. I’m
    glad that most people who responded here have seen through the marketing gimmick of this ammunition and hope that not too many people will seriously consider this as their primary self-defense ammunition.

  • Dragonheart

    Problem with most of these bare gel block tests is they don’t represent a real shooting scenario. First, it should be assumed a human body would be covered with some type of clothing, possibly several layers and a heavy jacket. Second and most important, there is an 80% chance that the bullet will hit bone before penetrating enough to damage vitals. Brassfetcher.com, has already proven with extensive testing most open hollow points actually plug up with bone and debris and provide little expansion. The bullets that do expand in all the tests are the polymer filled bullets, like the Federal Guard Dog. Obviously a bullet that penetrates then fragments has a better chance of hitting a vital area. A light bullet driven very fast will fragment.

  • bbmg

    Here’s a thought – why not fill the void in the centre of the projectile with lead or polymer to give it a FMJ profile, this will add a couple of grains and take care of feeding issues, as well as improving the aerodynamic characteristics.

    The low weight of the bullet probably means it sheds velocity and therefore effectiveness fairly quickly with range.

    • Cymond

      At least some of the feeding issues seem to be related to the horizontal rings cut in to the outside of the bullet.

  • bbmg

    good points well made:

  • derfelcadarn

    Like I said in the first comments section let the zucchini beware, but with people the physics are just not with them.

  • INSPECTOR 71

    There are 200 foot pounds of energy missing from your 22lr replica …RIP has about 370….your 22’s carry about 180ft/lbs combined….a misleading example….you could push a 45acp bullet into the block with a stick, then shoot a block with an actual 1911, and call them the same? I think not.

  • panzercat

    “The trocars do break off the base as advertised, but the wound track is small compared to conventional HP ammunition.”

    Well, I was hoping for a bit more based on the full auto video, but I guess not. Failing in a glock is tough. That said, the above kind of a throw away statement that anybody watching the video could have predicted. In fact, I would go so far to say that a small track wound worked exactly as intended, creating six perforations along divergent paths in the hopes of tagging something vital; something a HP round can’t do in and of itself.
    I’m not sure what you were expecting out of the trocars performance since it’s clear that expansion isn’t the goal. Of course it’s small. They’re essentially needle fragments. Personally, I’m getting more of a “shotshell in a pistol” vibe from this round, one that is willing to make some tradeoffs in favor of others. Effective tradeoffs? That I can’t answer, but I can’t help but to feel that there is something about the reviewing of this round is off.
    Marketing hype certainly didn’t help, however. It all but predisposes one to look for the flaws.

  • CaseyRoman1

    “1265 FPS / 490 Muzzle Energy” On this I call BULL. Unless someone has changed how foot pounds are measured then a 96 grain projectile moving at 1265 FPS works out to 341 foot pounds.

    • bbmg

      They probably measured it in joules, sneaky.

      • EarlyMon

        That works out to 463 joules though. They updated the web site to say 370.

        What’s in a number when all you have is shenanigans?

  • OldNorthState

    …and when a 20 or even 25 round box of 9mm in the latest “configuration du jour” RUINS $50, it suddenly loses its gloss with me. Give me a simple yet effective, quality brand JHP or SJHP any day. There’s just too much hype flying on this “RIP” offering… even the name is cartoonish.

  • Karina

    How about ditch the trocar segmenting bullshit and just have these expand like they accidentally did in plywood on Part II of that test? THAT looked better.

    • Giolli Joker

      Yep it does, more like the Leigh ME are designed to do:

  • Remingtons new ammo in 9mm fired from an R51. A larger disruption than the wonder round. About twice the size actually.

  • PaulG

    All show and no blow, At least the old school Glaser slugs actually worked as advertised.

  • honestAbe

    This guy is a hater.
    How can you not be impressed by a single shot that does what 2 shots does. The initial expansion is superb and will expand inside the flesh upon impact.

  • derfelcadarn

    Physics is an exact science it works everywhere in the universe accepting black holes and subatomic particles and seeing as neither of these can be factored in they just cannot work. Energy requires mass and acceleration.

  • Richard Nightwood

    Hydra Shock. Stick with a proven round.

  • zebra dun

    As I said first time, accuracy, reliability and penetration is what I seek in a bullet.

    • Hyok Kim

      You get that from FMJ.

  • Mike Knox

    I’m not sure if I remember this correctly but there’s a Geneva Convention Ban on laceration type disintegrating/frangible ammunition..

    • SD

      You are correct. However, only restricted in war, not civilians or law enforcement.

  • GunTotingLib

    All just an effort to get you to pay a premium price for gimmick ammo. Put a couple of the cheapest .380 or 9MM into the bad guys chest or head and I guarantee you ruin his day just as much as an expensive gimmick round.

  • BreakAwayWar

    I have removed the RIP Ammo from my things to do list. That has freed me up to do more constructive things with my time and money.

  • Dennis Grandinetti

    This ammunition is a complete joke, gun store commando crap.. Nothing
    more than snake oil made to sell to those with a poor understanding of
    terminal ballistics and gunshot injury. Watching the promo videos is painful, as the folks making it
    clearly do not know what they don’t know…

    As their own videos
    shows the ammo is a poor performer… A shame they didn’t spend their
    graphics and full-auto budget on vetted FBI protocol tests. Keep in mind
    this new ammo does not meet minimum LE terminal performance guidelines,
    has poor penetration capabilities and a unproven claim to being blind
    to barriers. Including the fact that they are not testing in the
    industry standard Type 250A ordnance gelatin mixed to a 10%
    concentration and a temp of 4 deg C as made by both Kind and Knox, as
    well as Vyse. Which is used by almost all respected wound ballistic
    researchers, including Dr. Fackler at LAIR, the FBI BRF, JSWB-IPT, USMC,
    NSWC Crane, CHP, LAPD, SJPD, etc etc … Nonetheless…

    Take
    another look at the videos (referring more to the originals but these
    new ones as well), the bullet breaks into numerous pieces decreasing
    bullet mass and bullet size. Shooting into what they claim is a 20” long
    block.. Most of the small fragments appear to stay at a very
    superficial depth (about 5” or so had to tell due to the fact they do
    not provide any scientific data) and just a small caliber size piece of
    the base penetrates to any decent depth (around 16-17”) while making a
    very minimal permanent crush cavity. The videos through barriers do no
    look any more promising..These two new videos are much better, but still
    very unimpressive.

    The makers of this ammo also make outlandish
    claims on shock wave or whatever other terms they used in the video.
    Unlike rifle bullets, handgun bullets generally ONLY disrupt tissue by
    the crush mechanism. Temporary cavitation from most handgun bullets does
    NOT reliably damage tissue and is not usually a significant mechanism
    of wounding (which can be a serious wounding effect in rifles). Handgun
    bullets do not generally exhibit the fragmentation effects produced by
    rifle bullets. If handgun bullets fragment, the bullet fragments are
    usually found within 1 cm of the permanent cavity and wound severity is
    generally not increased. The critical factor in assessing the wounding
    effectiveness of handgun bullets, from the perspective of military and
    law enforcement personnel as well as private citizens who depend on
    firearms to protect themselves, is the ability of the bullet to reliably
    penetrate at least 12 inches (30.5 cm) of soft tissue, the minimum
    depth necessary to ensure disruption of the major organs and blood
    vessels in the torso from any angle. Of the bullets which attain this
    goal of deep penetration, those with a larger diameter crush more
    tissue. Greater tissue disruption can increase hemorrhage and promote
    faster incapacitation from rapid blood loss. Vital anatomic structures
    are located deep within the body, protected by various layers of tissue.
    The major blood vessels in the torso of even a slender adult are
    located approximately 6″ (15 cm) from the ventral skin surface and much
    deeper in larger individuals. Bullets must be able to penetrate deeply
    enough to disrupt the major organs and blood vessels in the torso and
    cause the massive hemorrhage which results in rapid incapacitation in
    the absence of central nervous system trauma. Thick clothing, body
    angulation, and intervening anatomic structures, such as excess adipose
    tissue, hypertrophied muscle, or even an arm, hand, or shoulder, can
    increase the distance a bullet must penetrate to reach the vital organs
    and blood vessels of the torso.

    Compare this bullet or the other
    new gunstore commando bullets like the USM4 to something like the
    Federal HST or Speer Gold Dot http://le.atk.com/resources/videos.aspx
    (scroll right to the Wound Ballistic Workshops: Pistol ammunition) The
    HST (and other) loads in the video far surpassed snake oil bullets in
    terms of terminal performance. The HST penetrated better, the HST wound
    tracks had no deviation from the shot lines after impact, the HST
    created larger permanent crush cavities due to a larger expanded
    diameter vs. caliber size hole (which is the ONLY wounding mechanism of
    handgun ammunition unlike rifles which take advantage of the the
    temporary/stretch cavity), and the HST had minimal if not, no
    fragmentation.

    Anyone interested in this topic should read and
    periodically re-read, “Handgun Wounding Factors and Effectiveness” By
    Urey Patrick of the FBI FTU, as it remains the single best discussion of
    the wound ballistic requirements of handguns used for self-defense —
    it is available at: http://www.firearmstactical.com/hwfe.htm

    Better options for the armed citizen and the LE/Mil communities would be more proven concepts and designs such as…

    9mm:
    Barnes XPB 115 gr JHP (copper bullet)
    Federal Tactical 124 gr JHP (LE9T1)
    Federal HST 124 gr +P JHP (P9HST3)
    Remington Golden Saber bonded 124 gr +P JHP (GSB9MMD)
    Speer Gold Dot 124 gr +P JHP
    Winchester Ranger-T 124 gr +P JHP (RA9124TP)
    Winchester 124 gr +P bonded JHP (RA9BA)
    Winchester Ranger-T 127 gr +P+ JHP (RA9TA)
    Federal Tactical 135 gr +P JHP (LE9T5)
    Federal HST 147 gr JHP (P9HST2)
    Remington Golden Saber 147 gr JHP (GS9MMC)
    Speer Gold Dot 147 gr JHP Winchester Ranger-T 147 gr JHP (RA9T)
    Winchester 147 gr bonded JHP (RA9B/Q4364)

    40S&W:
    Barnes XPB 140 & 155 gr JHP (copper bullet)
    Speer Gold Dot 155 gr JHP
    Federal Tactical 165 gr JHP (LE40T3)
    Speer Gold Dot 165 gr JHP
    Winchester Ranger-T 165 gr JHP (RA40TA)
    Federal HST 180 gr JHP (P40HST1)
    Federal Tactical 180 gr JHP (LE40T1)
    Remington Golden Saber 180 gr JHP (GS40SWB)
    Speer Gold Dot 180 gr JHP
    Winchester Ranger-T 180 gr JHP (RA40T)
    Winchester 180 gr bonded JHP (RA40B/Q4355/S40SWPDB1)

    45Auto:
    Barnes XPB 185 gr JHP (copper bullet)
    Hornady Critical Duty 220 gr +P JHP
    Federal HST 230 gr JHP (P45HST2)
    Federal HST 230 gr +P JHP (P45HST1)
    Federal Tactical 230 gr JHP (LE45T1)
    Speer Gold Dot 230 gr JHP
    Winchester Ranger-T 230 gr JHP (RA45T)
    Winchester Ranger-T 230 gr +P JHP (RA45TP)

    Read more: http://www.recoilweb.com/more-on-the-r-i-p-round-40901.html#ixzz30CiKoAdW

  • Dennis Grandinetti

    This ammunition is a complete joke, gun store commando crap.. Nothing more than snake oil made to sell to those with a poor understanding of terminal ballistics and gunshot injury. Watching the linked video (both these new ones and the originals) is painful, as the folks making it clearly do not know what they don’t know…

    As their own videos shows the ammo is a poor performer… But having Batman narrate was a good touch. A shame they didn’t spend their graphics and full-auto budget on vetted FBI protocol tests. Keep in mind this new ammo does not meet minimum LE terminal performance guidelines, has poor penetration capabilities and a unproven claim to being blind to barriers. Including the fact that they are not testing in the industry standard Type 250A ordnance gelatin mixed to a 10% concentration and a temp of 4 deg C as made by both Kind and Knox, as well as Vyse. Which is used by almost all respected wound ballistic researchers, including Dr. Fackler at LAIR, the FBI BRF, JSWB-IPT, USMC, NSWC Crane, CHP, LAPD, SJPD, etc etc … Nonetheless…

    Take another look at the videos, the bullet breaks into numerous pieces decreasing bullet mass and bullet size. Shooting into what they claim is a 20” long block.. Most of the small fragments appear to stay at a very superficial depth (about 5” or so had to tell due to the fact they do not provide any scientific data) and just a small caliber size piece of the base penetrates to any decent depth (around 16-17”) while making a very minimal permanent crush cavity. The videos through barriers do no look any more promising..

    The makers of this ammo also make outlandish claims on shock wave or whatever other terms they used in the video. Unlike rifle bullets, handgun bullets generally ONLY disrupt tissue by the crush mechanism. Temporary cavitation from most handgun bullets does NOT reliably damage tissue and is not usually a significant mechanism of wounding (which can be a serious wounding effect in rifles). Handgun bullets do not generally exhibit the fragmentation effects produced by rifle bullets. If handgun bullets fragment, the bullet fragments are usually found within 1 cm of the permanent cavity and wound severity is generally not increased. The critical factor in assessing the wounding effectiveness of handgun bullets, from the perspective of military and law enforcement personnel as well as private citizens who depend on firearms to protect themselves, is the ability of the bullet to reliably penetrate at least 12 inches (30.5 cm) of soft tissue, the minimum depth necessary to ensure disruption of the major organs and blood vessels in the torso from any angle. Of the bullets which attain this goal of deep penetration, those with a larger diameter crush more tissue. Greater tissue disruption can increase hemorrhage and promote faster incapacitation from rapid blood loss. Vital anatomic structures are located deep within the body, protected by various layers of tissue. The major blood vessels in the torso of even a slender adult are located approximately 6″ (15 cm) from the ventral skin surface and much deeper in larger individuals. Bullets must be able to penetrate deeply enough to disrupt the major organs and blood vessels in the torso and cause the massive hemorrhage which results in rapid incapacitation in the absence of central nervous system trauma. Thick clothing, body angulation, and intervening anatomic structures, such as excess adipose tissue, hypertrophied muscle, or even an arm, hand, or shoulder, can increase the distance a bullet must penetrate to reach the vital organs and blood vessels of the torso.

    Compare this bullet or the other new gunstore commando bullets like the USM4 to something like the Federal HST or Speer Gold Dot http://le.atk.com/resources/videos.aspx (scroll right to the Wound Ballistic Workshops: Pistol ammunition) The HST (and other) loads in the video far surpassed snake oil bullets in terms of terminal performance. The HST penetrated better, the HST wound tracks had no deviation from the shot lines after impact, the HST created larger permanent crush cavities due to a larger expanded diameter vs. caliber size hole (which is the ONLY wounding mechanism of handgun ammunition unlike rifles which take advantage of the the temporary/stretch cavity), and the HST had minimal if not, no fragmentation.

    Anyone interested in this topic should read and periodically re-read, “Handgun Wounding Factors and Effectiveness” By Urey Patrick of the FBI FTU, as it remains the single best discussion of the wound ballistic requirements of handguns used for self-defense — it is available at: http://www.firearmstactical.com/hwfe.htm

    Better options for the armed citizen and the LE/Mil communities would be more proven concepts and designs such as…

    9mm:
    Barnes XPB 115 gr JHP (copper bullet)
    Federal Tactical 124 gr JHP (LE9T1)
    Federal HST 124 gr +P JHP (P9HST3)
    Remington Golden Saber bonded 124 gr +P JHP (GSB9MMD)
    Speer Gold Dot 124 gr +P JHP
    Winchester Ranger-T 124 gr +P JHP (RA9124TP)
    Winchester 124 gr +P bonded JHP (RA9BA)
    Winchester Ranger-T 127 gr +P+ JHP (RA9TA)
    Federal Tactical 135 gr +P JHP (LE9T5)
    Federal HST 147 gr JHP (P9HST2)
    Remington Golden Saber 147 gr JHP (GS9MMC)
    Speer Gold Dot 147 gr JHP Winchester Ranger-T 147 gr JHP (RA9T)
    Winchester 147 gr bonded JHP (RA9B/Q4364)

    40S&W:
    Barnes XPB 140 & 155 gr JHP (copper bullet)
    Speer Gold Dot 155 gr JHP
    Federal Tactical 165 gr JHP (LE40T3)
    Speer Gold Dot 165 gr JHP
    Winchester Ranger-T 165 gr JHP (RA40TA)
    Federal HST 180 gr JHP (P40HST1)
    Federal Tactical 180 gr JHP (LE40T1)
    Remington Golden Saber 180 gr JHP (GS40SWB)
    Speer Gold Dot 180 gr JHP
    Winchester Ranger-T 180 gr JHP (RA40T)
    Winchester 180 gr bonded JHP (RA40B/Q4355/S40SWPDB1)

    45Auto:
    Barnes XPB 185 gr JHP (copper bullet)
    Hornady Critical Duty 220 gr +P JHP
    Federal HST 230 gr JHP (P45HST2)
    Federal HST 230 gr +P JHP (P45HST1)
    Federal Tactical 230 gr JHP (LE45T1)
    Speer Gold Dot 230 gr JHP
    Winchester Ranger-T 230 gr JHP (RA45T)
    Winchester Ranger-T 230 gr +P JHP (RA45TP)

  • A-H1

    Bullets aside, this guy’s little high-pitched voice is severely annoying!

  • Hyok Kim

    I wasted a lot of my time and energy, and money, too on exotic bullets. Finally, I concluded that the most important criteria was reliability, accuracy, and penetration.

    FMJ is it, plus it’s cheaper than HP.

  • JohnJay

    I miss Black Talon.

    • Phil Elliott

      Still around, just called by a different name ie: Winchester SVT