FLIR R-Series Thermal Sight

The new, compact FLIR R-Series thermal sight.

The new, compact FLIR R-Series thermal sight.

FLIR, a world leader in infrared technology, has announced the addition of the Thermosight R-Series.  The R-Series is priced just under $3500, which is about half the cost of most other high quality thermal sights.  The R-Series is designed for hunting, as well as for military or law enforcement applications.  The R-Series thermal sight comes in a more compact housing than previous FLIR models, increasing its portability.

The FLIR R-Series thermal sight.

The FLIR R-Series thermal sight.

Some of the features of the FLIR Thermosight R-series:

  • Multiple resolution and lens options
  • 3-inch eye relief
  • Up to 16x magnification
  • Advanced image correction
  • Shock reduction system
  • Simple, 4-button operation
  • Three reticle settings with a repeatable and dependable zero
  • Integrated, rubberized lens covers
  • LaRue Tactical RCO QD Picatinny rail mount.
The objective lens of the R-Series thermal sight.

The objective lens of the R-Series thermal sight.

The ocular lens of the R-Series thermal sight.

The ocular lens of the R-Series thermal sight.

The FLIR R-series is designed for day and night use, though the night vision application will likely provide the best differentiation of heated objects or animals.  Thermal sights have the advantage over conventional night vision optics because they do not require ambient lighting sources.  In addition, thermal scopes can identify heated objects that are in darkened areas, or behind foliage.

The FLIR R-series sight will offer up to (6) different detection palettes, including FLIR’s exclusive InstAlert.  The InstAlert displays the hottest temperatures in red so the shooter can more readily assess and engage targets.  A light shield for the optic lens provides additional protection from dust, rain, or excessive light.

The internal shock reduction system (SRS-M) is capable of withstanding repeated shots from an AR-platform rifle up to .30 caliber.  The R-Series has a water resistant casing that can be submerged up to 3-feet of water without damaging the sight.  FLIR offers a 2-year warranty (3-year with registration) on the scope, and a 10-year warranty on the internal sensor.

The R-Series 4-button controls are enlarged for easier menu scrolling even with gloved shooters.

The R-Series 4-button controls are enlarged for easier menu scrolling even with gloved shooters.

The 4-button controls are large to ensure gloved shooters can still easily manipulate them.  Every key setting is designed to scroll through the menu in three clicks or less.  The four controls are for:

  • Dual power/calibration
  • Zoom in/menu navigation
  • Main menu
  • Zoom out/menu navigation.

The FLIR R-Series comes with a LaRue Tactical RCO quick detach Picatinny rail mount that uses a locking lever for ease of mounting and dismounting.

The LaRue Tactical RCO quick detach mount.

The LaRue Tactical RCO quick detach mount.

A closer look at the LaRue mount.

A closer look at the LaRue mount.

The LaRue RCO QD release lever.

The LaRue RCO QD release lever.

Imaging in the R-series depends on the lens selection – 13mm, 19mm, 35mm, and 60mm, with the field of view narrowing as the magnification increases.  The resolution ranges from 240×180 to 640×480, but the majority of options are set at 320×240.



Advertisement

  • iksnilol

    When they say “up to .30 caliber” do they mean 300 BLK or .308?

    • GreenPlease

      I’m guessing .308

      • http://www.thefirearmblog.com/ Phil W “Senior Writer TFB”

        .308 is correct

    • TV-PressPass

      They’re specifically saying .308 semi-auto is the safe zone. If you’ve got a brake on your Rem 700, you’re probably okay. If you’re hot loading your .338 lapua, you’re probably not. With a good recoil rail though . . .

  • GreenPlease

    That almost seems reasonably sized… like the size of a large ACOG. Nice. A cool feature would be a mechanism that turned the scope on and off depending on the proximity of your eye to the eyepiece.

  • TV-PressPass

    I spent Monday night shooting the thing. It’s one of the best thermal solutions I’ve ever used!
    http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2014/01/14/flir-thermosight-rs-civilian-rifle-scope-hands-on/

  • DiverEngrSL17K

    A notable advance in compact thermal-imaging IR optics for small arms. It would be even better if the integral recoil / shock resistance were higher without having to resort to a recoil rail, although I’m sure this would make it more expensive…..but then again perhaps not by that much ( say, $1000 or so more ), which would still make it very cost-effective.

  • noob

    could it be helmet mounted?

    • http://www.scoutbasecamp.com/ TV-PressPass

      No you want the LS64 for that:

  • MrSatyre

    Am I the only one who finds it strange that a company would name itself after a technology acronym that has been in use for decades? How was that even approved by the P&TO in the first place? Does the USAF and every other branch have to pay them royalties every time they use forward looking infra red systems? That would be like Boeing renaming itself Jet Airplane, or NASA renaming itself Rockets. Weird.

    • http://www.scoutbasecamp.com/ TV-PressPass

      From what I understand: FLIR the company is the original pioneer of the technology, the guys have been doing it since the 1970s. So yes, they can do that.