BROWE Combat Optic

BROWE Combat Optic

BROWE Combat Optic in ATACS with bare titanium housing (top)

The BROWE Combat Optic (BCO) is a military-grade 4×32 rifle optic with a machined titanium housing which is stronger than steel and lighter than aluminum. It is short and lightweight, keeping more of the rail free for gear and accessories. The BCO’s Target Light Sensor uses a photocell measure light levels at the target, not at the shooter. This means that the red chevron reticle’s illumination and contrast is appropriate for what’s being targeted through the optic regardless of the environment. For example, a shooter in bright sunlight targeting someone or something inside of a cave or building will get the proper brightness for the best shot. The brightness level is updated continuously as the shooter moves or lighting conditions change without requiring intervention on the part of the shooter.

A single control button is used to switch from OFF/SLEEP to AUTO to MANUAL. The manual mode overrides the automatic Target Light Sensor setting to provide steady reticle illumination. Manual mode has 10 daylight and 3 night vision brightness level settings which are cycled through. Holding the button for three seconds switches back to AUTO. The BCO also features a port for a remote pressure switch.

It’s powered by a lithium 123 battery for up to 2,000 hours and a minimum of 720 hours on full power. A vibration sensor conserves batter life by switching to SLEEP mode if no movement is detected for two hours. The housing has machined bosses for mounting small on the top and it has a 42mmx3mm ring for accepting threaded accessories such as dust covers, filters, or anti-reflection on the objective housing. The eyepiece housing has 30mm threads and the whole optic is waterproof down to 130 feet. The BCO comes with a choice of name-brand high-quality rail mounts.



Shelby Murdoc

Murdoc is a freelancer who writes at various publications and web sites including Shooting Sports Retailer and GunPundit.com.


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  • iksnilol

    I am not a metalurgist but I doubt that titanium is lighter than aluminium.

    Would it possible to see a picture through the scope (the reticle)?

    • mattinthecouv

      I looked twice at this as well. perhaps the case is lighter than IF they had used aluminum, because it allowed them to make it thinner by using the stronger material.

    • David

      Aluminum alloy tensile yield strength:
      6061-T6 45,000 PSI
      7075-T6 67,000 PSI

      Titanium alloy tensile yield strength:
      110,000 PSI

      Weight:
      Aluminum ~.09750 lb/ci
      Titanium ~.16300 lb/ci

      Thus: Titanium is ~1.67 times the weight of aluminum, 1.64 times the strength of 7075 and 2.44 times the strength of 6061.

      It’s a tradeoff. Titanium alloy has considerably better fatigue life than aluminum. But for the body of a scope I doubt that’s an issue. Titanium is prone to galling under machining (chunks being pulled rather than slices being cut). So it is expensive to machine by comparison. Titanium also has a much much higher strength under extreme temperature which is again not necessary for a scope body. Both alloys are relatively soft. I do know that titanium’s hardness is linear with it’s tensile strength. The harder the alloy, the higher the tensile strength, typically.

      • JumpIf NotZero

        Except for your use of imperial units you’re correct 😉

        Ti is heavier than aluminum… HOWEVER… It’s also approx twice as strong. In SOME designs it’s possible to thin out the thickness using titanium and wind up with a part that is the same strength as aluminum but lighter. Or it’s possible to end up stronger and heavier.

        It’s rare to end up lighter AND stronger. Esp considering the common use of 7075 in the past 20 years.

        That said, in some designs like silencers, your goal may be to wind up with more internal volume, or less wall thickness. This means that SOMETIMES a Ti can could be lighter, and have more volume (likely quieter) than an aluminum can but probably won’t be any stronger, but will more corrosion resistant so there is also that. Aluminum is pretty poor for corrosion resistance, Ti very good to excellent depending on grade or alloy.

        The use of Ti is only partially strength or weight. Consumers just mostly think it sounds cool.

        That titanium AR awhile back was full of stupidity as it was not thinned out, meaning it was much heavier than a normal AR. Also much stronger, but show me all those broken AR receivers…

      • Ian Wendt

        Well, first, let’s specify the Ti alloy you’re quoting. There’s about a million of them (exaggeration). And then let’s talk about how it’s not relevant because the Browe optics aren’t made using an alloy. They’re cast (not machined) from Commercially Pure Titanium. So, not really an alloy. And nowhere near three times stronger than 7075 Al, that Trijicon uses. Also, as somebody else has pointed out, Titanium is absolutely not lighter than Aluminum.

    • David

      Aluminum alloy tensile yield strength:
      6061-T6 45,000 PSI
      7075-T6 67,000 PSI

      Titanium alloy tensile yield strength:
      110,000 PSI

      Weight:
      Aluminum ~.09750 lb/ci
      Titanium ~.16300 lb/ci

      Thus: Titanium is ~1.67 times the weight of aluminum, 1.64 times the strength of 7075 and 2.44 times the strength of 6061.

      It’s a tradeoff. Titanium alloy has considerably better fatigue life than aluminum. But for the body of a scope I doubt that’s an issue. Titanium is prone to galling under machining (chunks being pulled rather than slices being cut). So it is expensive to machine by comparison. Titanium also has a much much higher strength under extreme temperature which is again not necessary for a scope body. Both alloys are relatively soft. I do know that titanium’s hardness is linear with it’s tensile strength. The harder the alloy, the higher the tensile strength, typically.

  • iksnilol

    I am not a metalurgist but I doubt that titanium is lighter than aluminium.

    Would it possible to see a picture through the scope (the reticle)?

  • thedonn007

    Dare I ask, what is the price on this thing?

    • JumpIf NotZero

      If you have to ask….

      Nah, They are competitive with the ACOG, but imo the ACOG is about $150-200 per model too high anyhow. Browe are certainly not much cheaper. Hopefully Browe some day gets serious and decides to put a hurt on Trijicon in terms of street price, but that has not happened yet.

      • BROWEINC

        BROWE just introduced a new BROWE Tactical Optic (BTO). All the features of the BROWE Combat Optic (BTO), but built in a forged 7075-T6 housings. Street price of $999.00 and will officially launch in mid-year.

  • Lance

    Looks like a ACOG copy. How much is it if its over $500 its not worth it then get a ACOG.

    • gunslinger

      yup. price point?

      Lucid HD7?

      • Nate Johnson

        You folks can’t be serious.

        “BROWE, Inc was founded in 2009 by Brian K. Browe, former Director of Operations of Trijicon, Inc. Mr. Browe has over 16 years experience in manufacturing combat and tactical optics with extensive experience in all aspects of the business. BROWE, Inc. was founded on a simple idea of building the ultimate combat optic. Two years of extensive research and development resulted in the 4×32 BROWE Combat Optic.”

        He didn’t “copy” the ACOG. He improved on it. It’s got a certain shape because it’s a very efficient shape for a fixed mag optic and it also is designed to be used with the same NVG and other accessories that the .mil already uses with ACOGs.

        It’s NOTHING like a Lucid 7 (which is nothing more than a red dot, housed in a body that is shaped like an ACOG).

        This is more similar to the LED ACOG (and I’m pretty certain BROWE’s version was either announced or actually hit the market before the ACOG LED did), except it has many more features. The glass is as good or better than the ACOG. One button push turns on the LED and the auto brightness feature that measures the target’s brightness and adjusts to compensate is something that none of Trijicon’s products offer. Bonus, you can still manually select brightness level. 2nd Bonus, the LED will turn itself off after 2 hours if no movement is detected (preserving battery life). It uses a relatively common long storage life battery (CR123A).

        Browe has multiple reticles available (Chevron, Crosshair) 5.56, 300BLK (only available in horseshoe, and has reference marks for subs and supers), 7.62×39 (available from OneSourceTactical exclusively at this point) and .308 (Chevron only). These reticles can be ordered in Red, Green, Blue or Amber. Furthermore, the reticles are etched, so even if your battery dies you still have a fantastic daytime optic (and if you’re rocking NVGs, you probably have extra batteries handy anyway).

        Also, you can order a BCO with your choice of LaRue, American Defense or Arms mounts.

        If you keep your eyes open, you can often find a new BROWE for right at $1000-1100. That’s in the same range as a Dual Illumination ACOG or an LED ACOG. At the absolute worst, it’s a match for the ACOG, I believe it exceeds it. I think the worst thing about it is that the company is relatively unproven and no one knows how long BROWEinc will survive (and thus how long will warranty service be available?).

  • Hyok Kim

    Is this made in China or India?