Beautiful Photos of Bullet Cross Sections

I love looking at bullet cross-sections. A US-based Austrian photographer took 900 photos of bullet cross sections in Switzerland, presumably the property of a ammo collector. A selection of them can seen of online.

Thanks to everyone who sent this in.



Steve Johnson

Founder and Dictator-In-Chief of TFB. A passionate gun owner, a shooting enthusiast and totally tacti-uncool. Favorite first date location: any gun range. Steve can be contacted here.


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  • Annon0048

    Cool….

  • Vermin.308Winchester

    The Swiss craftsman deserves the credit, the childish obviously historically bulligurent photographer coming in and making brainless comments about “evil” and “the human condition” to enhance his progressive “artist” reputation is an insult to the craftsmen and the subjectmatter. His Austrian origin simply adds too picture of a small judgemental man who ignores history in favor of fantasy

    • noob

      indeed it is a pity since the photographer is a hot chick.

      http://www.pearlmanphotography.com/index.php#mi=1&pt=0&pi=2&s=0&p=-1&a=0&at=0

      • Mr. Fahrenheit

        How can you tell?

        • Mr. Fahrenheit

          Never mind. Ipad browser is different than a PC browser.

      • Vermin.308Winchester

        LOL good fact checking. I get bit in the ass alot

    • Llewellyn Franks

      I personally liked the artists comments at the end because they remarked on how the object is ambiguous by nature and can be used for evil as well as the “beautiful” (I’m assuming that means acts of heroism) and is thus a reflection on the human condition because we are all neither evil nor good by nature.

      But seriously dude lighten up, I think the only judgmental person here is you.

      • Vermin.308Winchester

        Your previouse comments on comment shitstorm about the pig ammo were some of the more reasonable there. Although I believe the photographer was referring to physical rather than represenrative beauty of the cross sectioned cartridges. That is to say an objects phisical appeal rather than the positive emotions triggered bye what that object represents

        • Llewellyn Franks

          Honestly this is just my interpretation of what they said but the fact that a bullet can be used to kill an innocent or to kill a assailant makes them quite ambiguous.

  • Ronin

    Das Museum in dem sich die Ausstellung befindet. 30km von meinem Wohnort. 🙂
    http://www.festung.ch/index.php?id=3

    http://www.festung.ch/index.php?id=45

    • JeffAStevens

      Thanks! One of those is fascinating. A poor Google translate indicates that one of the rounds cross-sectioned there was fake/sabotage ammunition manufactured by the British for the Mauser used by the Germans in WWII, and airdropped behind enemy lines. It not only wouldn’t work, it would destroy the rifle it was used in. Never heard of that. Anyone have any further information on it?

  • noob

    question – how does one safely cut through a live primer anvil without igniting it?

    do you have to freeze it with liquid nitrogen?

    • John Daniels

      A primer won’t go off that way. I’ve cross-sectioned some unloaded, but primed cases. No special procedures are required, just a jeweler’s saw.

    • Vermin.308Winchester

      Cross sectioning cartridges is a question of how “right” you want it to look in the end. Cleaning primers completely and leaving them empty is pretty standard procedure for hobbyists you can also glue the powder and shot into a nice clean mass that looks terrible or you can do whatever this person did

  • JeffAStevens

    Really fabulous photos. I do wonder what some of those cartridges are. Page 2 on the right? Page 1 on the far left? All of Page 4? Fascinating but I wan ot know more!

    • Page 1 far left: German training ammo from the ’70.
      No idea for the others..

    • bbmg

      Page 4 on the left:

      9x19mm Israeli “Sky marshal” TZ – 1 -72. Brass cased, projectile is stainless
      steel balls in a resin matrix.
      Developed as either a squeeze bore, were the round is broken up in the barrel
      of the pistol for a shot gun effect, or as a frangible that would break up on
      hard targets, but enter soft ones. It was rejected and eventually given the name
      “Sky Marshall” by a D. Dietz. Same time frame as the Israeli SSB (Salvo Squeeze
      Bore?) loads made by Colt. Not very accurate

    • bbmg

      page 4 on the left is also an israeli round:

      http://i246.photobucket.com/albums/gg94/DKconfiguration/HSA.jpg

  • Ryan

    Cool photos. I’d love to see the rest!

  • dp

    In page 5, third image from left to right shows 3projectile stock up shot. Does anyone know anything about its origin, history and so on? Thanks.

    • Zapp Brannigan

      I believe it’s a 30-06 SALVO triplex round.

  • bbmg

    A detailed story behind each of the rounds would have been better apprexiated than a pseudo-intellectual comment on the human condition.

    The ones illustrating this post are presumable a Glaser “safety slug” and a .224 BOZ PDW round. Have a look here for some more academically presented sectioned cartridges: http://cartridgecollectors.org/cmo/cmoindex.htm