Impressive Video From Italian Gun Grease

Italian Gun Grease (IGG) is a new true grease (a technical term not a marketing term) for lubricating firearms. Normally I am unimpressed with new lubricants and don’t pay a lot of attention to them (you can try my teflon-infused RemOil from my cold dead fingers) but I found this video demonstration of the lubricating properties of the IGG Tactical formula compared with Remington RemOil, Winchester BreakFree and Hoppe’s Elite Gun Oil very impressive …

The company is giving away free samples of their Tactical Formula (well, they are charging $0.05 for them, but close enough to free).

Would y’all like us to run our own tests on this lubricant? Can you make any suggestions on how we could compare it with other lubricants? Bear in mind we do not have scientific measuring equipment.





Steve Johnson

Founder and Dictator-In-Chief of TFB. A passionate gun owner, a shooting enthusiast and totally tacti-uncool. Favorite first date location: any gun range. Steve can be contacted here.


Advertisement

  • John Daniels

    I’ll just stick with motor oil.

    • Steve (TFB Editor)

      What is your reason for using it? Availability or cost? Or do you think it is actually better than the brand-name gun oils?

      I must admit, smell is part of my decision in choosing a lubricant.

      • Nooky

        Try Ballistol if you like to sniff your oils 🙂

        • BryanS

          Or Weaponsheild. my wife loves the smell of it, and its non-toxic.

        • Frog Lube. It’s not really smelling oils it’s more like filling the room with the smell when cleaning a gun.

          • John Botts

            My choice has been Gunzilla…it has a very pleasant scent.

        • Davdberg

          I only use ballistol for everything. Lubing and cleaning any firearm

      • JaredN

        It seems to me that the environment of a gun simply isn’t a very challenging one from a lubrication standpoint. It doesn’t have extreme heat or extreme pressures. So I have a hard time seeing how the latest “miracle” oil or grease (which is undoubtedly an industrial grease that they buy in 55 gallon drums, repackage, and mark up 1000%) is going to make any significant difference.

        As for doing your own tests, unless you are going to come up with some sort of scientific procedure, I just don’t see the point.

        • Ian

          Not undoubtedly, absolutely. I’ve seen drums of various oils mixed together to a random “recipe” and sold for several hundred times the cost.

          Guns aren’t magical entities needing ultra special attention. They’re tiny, simple, and fairly archaic little machines.

        • Cornelius Carroll

          I could see lubricants specifically designed to handle the residue of gun powder. A gun powder/gun powder residue agnostic lubricant would be very nice to have on something like an AR.

      • David

        I use Amsoil 20w50. It’s what I put in my car, the add pack is amazing. In the add pack are some really really good anti-wear additives as well as esters for keeping rubber seals swelled and so-forth. It’s also heavy enough to not go flying off my my gun when I fire it. Motor oil, for the most part, is specifically designed to be as friction mitigating and wear mitigating as possible under high heat.

        Grease is great for applications that require high pressure, and relatively low heat. Things like main bearings in the crank, u-njoints, axle bearings and so forth. The trigger assembly would be a good application for grease. And as long as the heat is low enough, the slide on a pistol. As soon as things heat up, greases start to do poorly versus oils. So on my AR15 I use oil.

        That test is flawed because it is exactly the kind of test a grease would outperform an oil. Why are they comparing their grease to two oils?

        http://www.bobistheoilguy.com is a great forum full of chemical engineer sand enthusiasts. I’ve submitted a couple of oil samples from my car for wear analysis in tailoring the additives I use.

        • PaulD

          Certainly Amsoil is a great product. However, motor oils are designed for very hot environments for very extended periods of time. A gun simply doesn’t compare in these regards. My point being that Amsoil, and all the additives in it, are complete overkill for a gun. Any form of motor oil will perform as well for this purpose.

      • Spencer W

        I have used motor oil for about 5 years now and can say it is the best I have seen so far. I have had problems with oils like Rem-oil evaporating or burning off on many firearms in the past. And I have had a serious rust problem here in Ohio with the standard gun oils, they all fail to stop the rust after just one day of hunting in the rain. I use 10W-40 and high temp baring grease on almost all my firearms and knives because it works, it is very cheap and readily available. I will cut the grease with oil for some parts but for the mostly I use it as is.

        Some examples of how the messy properties of the grease have worked well for me.

        I have a Browning buckmark that would need cleaning after only 300 rounds when using Rem-oil but now that I slathered it in grease it is at 1500+ and still going strong. I am thinking from what I have seen that the vaporized lead/lead shavings/unburnt powder that are prominent in the 22lr are just landing on the layer of grease and then being worked out of the way, this also makes cleaning a lot easier. I have tested this on many other 22s and it has the same results.

        I have an Extrema that I use for waterfowl hunting from a kayak so it can get wet, really wet sometimes. Every so often I would have a stove pipe or a failure to go into battery and the action was spotless. I found that it was small layers of ice causing most of it, one time the action was frozen shut to the point that I had to shoot it(at a goose) to open it. As for rust I had rust spots just starting on the exposed stainless in the action and the choke almost rusted in place. After that I slathered the choke in grease put a thin coat of oil over everything then put a thin coat of grease over the receiver, bolt and bolt carrier group. I have not had a problem since.

        I am looking into alternatives for health, and cleanup reasons but I will use this method until something better comes along and for how cheap it is it will have to be a lot better.

      • John Daniels

        It gets the job done just fine, cleans up easily, is easy to apply, and a quart lasts a lifetime. Even if I buy the most expensive motor oil on the planet, it’s still less expensive than any “gun grease”. Gun grease is snake oil. If it works in a car engine, it’ll work in a gun.

    • It really isn’t good for the gun to use motor oil for the reasons Aaron stated. It’s just not pure enough having bits of tiny particles of metal and other junk that gun products don’t have. It will cause excess wear over time. I firmly believe that.

      • JaredN

        Seriously? You think that new motor oil out of a fresh bottle has tiny particles of metal?

        I don’t use used motor oil that I drained from the vehicle. I use new motor oil that has never been used.

        • michael

          synthetic motor oil is a fantastic and cheap way to lube. Don’t let anyone kid you.

          • JaredN

            No kidding. They really expect me to believe that new motor oil, which is going into engines which are built to much finer tolerances than a gun’s frame-to-slide fit, contains metal particles? :rolleyes:

          • John Daniels

            Exactly. Anyone who makes a claim like that is getting paid by one of the gun oil companies. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again; TFB is turning into just another typical gun rag. Bought in whole by the industry.

          • ST4

            I am still awaiting the ones to call shenanigans on TFB and other typical gun rags to band together and make what they think is a legit gun blog. This isn’t a jab, but an actual thing I and many others I’m betting, would be curious to see.

          • You’re already reading a legit gun blog.

          • That’s a bit of BS if I ever heard any. If you don’t believe motor oil doesn’t have impurities that’s fine. I get that info from those in the industry I believe I can trust. If I thought it bogus information I’d say so. Bought by the gun companies– I hope you aren’t serious because that’s as far from the truth as you can get. Just because you’re saying it again doesn’t make it true.

          • John please nobody is getting paid by gun oil companies. There’s also no big conspiracy to fool readers.
            I think you owe Steve an apology for that statement.

          • Steve (TFB Editor)

            Never even spoken to anyone at IGG before, yet here you are accusing me of people in the pay of “Big Oil” … these days if I don’t demonize a company I am the devil.

      • John Daniels

        Well, this isn’t the first thing I’ve read from you on this site that was suspect and/or obviously nonsense. No offense.

        • Hey if you can show me a statement I made that was wrong and you can prove I’m wrong I’ll gladly admit it. However blanket statements like this don’t hold water John.

          • Brett H

            why does the video say its been removed for copyright issues?

        • Can we get back to the topic and stop the TFB slamming.

  • Jim

    Ehh… This is kind of apples to oranges isn’t it. The products they tested against are oils not greases. Oils only offer minimal protection to sliding surfaces. A real test would have put the Italian Gun Grease up against Tetra Gun Grease or even off the shelf wheel bearing grease (what I use). I’m sure Italian Gun Grease works well and I figure on trying some but this isn’t a real comparison. Though it might help show people the real need for grease and not just oil.

    Like my daddy always said: If it slides grease it if it rotates oil it.

  • gunslinger

    wait… they call it free but charge a nickle? that’s not free….

    • gunslinger

      Aaron

      Thank you for the response. I was only half kidding about the ‘not free’ part. i figured it had to do with some funky setting either in your software or accounting department.

  • Nathan Tramp

    I don’t mind an unscientific test, but just make sure you do one that’s grease vs grease, not oil vs grease. Try it against some Prolix X-traT or something.

  • Gentlemen,

    My name is Aaron Iwanciw and I work for IGG. I would first like to thank Mr. Johnson for taking the time to post about our company. I would also like to thank all of the new IGG Family members who have been ordering product since 2:41AM!

    Second I want to address a couple of comments both on this post and others in the past. Trust me I know what you’re thinking, “oh no, not another lubricant company…” Well I will stand behind our products and say, “WE ARE NOT JUST ANOTHER LUBE COMPANY” Here is why, (short version) we are one of the only companies in this market with a team of 10 chemists, physicists, metallurgists and scientist, that have taken the time to wipe clean the slates of time and address the problems of firearms utilizing a systems process approach. We looked at everything from the different metals of the barrel, bullets, and cases, as well as the chemical reactions of the powders and interactions between those powders the lubricants and cleaners. Also, I have to say, we are an all American 100% made in the US company, everything from the product in our bottles to the paper we print our shipping receipts on. There is quite a story behind the “Italian” portion of the name but we’ll save that for another post.

    Jim, you mentioned this test is Apples to Oranges. I agree, however not on the premise of oil vs. grease. The product you see in that video is a very thick oil that was one of our very first formulations. Since that video was shot we have improved all of our oils to retain the same lubrication capability while now rejecting the dirt giving it more cleaning power and we have also added a natural Rust Preventative so that you have an extended period of protection against corrosion. We are currently working on many more videos to help compare and illustrate our products better. Our team is doing all we can to keep up with the orders and have had a hard time pulling away to shoot more videos. But we will get you guys some soon! Your dad, is certainly right, if it slides grease it, if it rotates oil it.

    Nathan, We understand that we should have used more scientific interments such as thermal cameras and amp meters and we are doing that with the next video. However this Timken test is the world’s ASTM standard test method for measuring friction reduction and was the best we could do to illustrate the effects of the rounds traveling at high speed. Please feel free to let us know if you have other suggestions, we absolutely want to give you what you ask for.

    Gunslinger, We do apologize for having to charge a penny for the sample. For whatever reason our shopping cart and PayPal will not allow us to do a 0.00 item. Our IT guys are working vigorously on our new website http://www.italiangungrease.com and the free samples are on the cue to be addressed.

    Mr. Daniel, I can understand your thoughts on motor oil however please consider that motor oil is quite simply designed for car engines. They are not refined, they off gas toxic fumes, and have traces of metals and contaminates within them. So please for your health and safety I would stay away from motor oil, same with WD40. Mobile 1 and WD40 are amazing products, I love them and use them regularly, just not on my firearms.

    Mr JaredN, I understand your frustration with the industry pumping out industrial lubricants and lies. I’m having to combat that every day. I will assure you that we are manufacturing all of our products in an ISO 9001 Certified Factory in batches of either 10 or 25 gallons at a time depending on demand that month. We use all virgin raw materials meaning that we don’t recycle or “re-squeeze” These products were developed from the ground up for military firearms by current and former military members. Even some of our chemists are former Army Rangers. This is one of the reasons why we are not just another lubricant company, because we take the time to analyze the issues and develop a formula based on the need of the user, not the amount of barrels we have sitting on the shelf. So you are right though many of the 150+ lubricant and cleaning companies out there are simply buying in bulk and marking up. We would never do such a thing. We are passionate shooters who’s lives depended or still depend on flawlessly operating weapons.

    I sincerely hope this addresses some of your concerns and thoughts. Please feel free to contact us or post more of your thoughts. Thank you for giving our products a shot.

    Know the Difference.

    Aaron I.

    • politicsbyothermeans

      Your chemists were Rangers? AHHHHHHH!!!! Just kidding; can’t wait to give your product a go.

      • LOL!! Not all of them… There are more Marine Grunts than Army guys here so we keep it nice and competitive!

    • Aaron,

      Thanks very much for taking the time to address our readers questions and comments. We look forward to more information in the future.
      I have to admit I’m very interested in newer lubricants and cleaners. I find it very informative to compare lubricants with different guns and types of ammunition.
      Again thanks for taking time to participate in this discussion.

  • Monroe

    The test is presented as simulating “a speeding bullet down a barrel”. Well that’s all fine if you want to believe that, but the implication is that you need to lubricate a barrel. Beyond cleaning a barrel of corrosive material for storage or long term periods of activity; there is no need to lubricate the friction bearing surfaces of a barrel.

    • Cornelius Carroll

      I’d be adverse to lubricating the barrel simply because the zero would shift as the lubricant dissipated. Further, the COF of a steel surface doesn’t change that much with temperature whereas the viscosity of something like oil can (and does) change substantially with temperature.

  • Stephen

    The addition of sand in this test was meaningless and seems to me to be a marketing ploy. The system was not enclosed, which means the first rotation pushes it out of the way and you have the exact same test that was already conducted.

    Also, did they add additional weight/time when initially they compared the Italian lube? I wasn’t sure. I wanted to see the exact same test for the first round and it seems less scientific and more marketing ploy to change the test pattern, even if it is to a more extreme test.

    Independent, and scientific, testing and comparing is necessary.

    • Stephen,

      Thank you for your observation on the sand. I will agree with you that the sand is not practical. For anyone who has been deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan understands that the dust and sand consistency is more like baby powder than the play sand shown in our video. At the time of shooting that video it was all we had available and wanted to at least use something than not have a more stringent test. It is not a marketing ploy is simply shows what happens when using that particular type of sand which is popular in this part of the world. The next video will have more middle east style dust/sand.

      Yes, in the video it shows the bearing running for twice the time and twice the weight. Then it shows the results compared to the competitors. After that we get into other tests such as the sand.

      Bottom line, we understand there are multiple ways of improving this video and are currently working hard to provide a video that addresses all of the mentioned concerns.

      We always say: that we can tell you the Difference, we can show you the Difference, but it is up to you guys to experience the Difference.

      Know, the Difference.

      Aaron I.

      • bman940

        I recently had a buddy put some IGG tactical Lube in 2 of my Smith and Wesson M&P 15/22’s that were acting up, failure to feed and eject. We ran another brick of 22 ammo through each without an issue. I”m using it in my AR’s now and so far so good.

      • Cornelius Carroll

        Assuming you guys did your homework, I’d demonstrate how your lubricant is resistant to the chemicals in gun powder. As others have said, the functional components of a firearm aren’t remarkable from heat and pressure standpoint. They are remarkable in that some designs introduce a large amount of residue into the action.

  • Monroe

    Oh, kept watching. Now implying that gun grease will make a rifle more accurate. You lost me completely.

  • Rob

    what is this about lubricating the inside of the barrel? I’ve always been taught don’t do that so you don’t cause buildup from other things?

    • Rob, That is correct, IGG is one of the few companies that will encourage you to lubricate the inside of the barrel. Here is why and how- you want to very lightly lubricate the inside of the barrel because you need to reduce the friction between the bullet and the barrel. Since our proprietary formula will penetrate into the pores of the metal it will not cause over pressurization or buildup. Just do not apply so much that the liquid pools at the bottom of the barrel. By penetrating into the pores the IGG lubricant will not be pushed/squeegeed out of the barrel by the bullet or the hot gasses. This will intern reduce friction, significantly reducing the ability for contaminates such as carbon, copper, lead and plastic to bond with the metal. Thus increasing the accuracy of the rifle itself simply because you are creating consistency. It will also increase your muzzle velocity between 2-14%. Yes, I get it 2% all the way to 14% is a big gap, well to be honest with you there are a lot of different metals, bullets, rifling, and barrel lengths out there that all play a role in accuracy. So we will never try to lie and tell you some average number.

      The reason you don’t want to use petrol-chemical or synthetic lubricants inside the barrel of your firearm is because it will carbonize and cause build up. The standard petrol-chemical molecular chain is simply too large to penetrate into the metal so they simply burn and turn to carbon. This creates more inconsistencies within your barrel that will scar the jacket of the bullet effecting its flight path. Granted these are very small changes but we are engineering products for the most extreme shooters where small changes turn into significant changes at 1,000-1,500 meters.

      Our lubricant’s molecular chain is small enough penetrate and condition the metal from the pores. Conditioning causes consistency, consistency gives you accuracy.

      Thank you,

      Aaron I.

      • Jim

        Aaron,

        I’ve been digging around online and I don’t find any sites that corroborate the the idea that the steel used in firearms has “pores”. In fact, it seems that no one describes gun metals as porous other than a handful of proprietary lubricant manufacturers. Is this a marketing term borrowed from the skin care industry to convey a concept to gun owners? Or is there science underneath?

        I’m no metallurgist/chemist/scientist, but I’d genuinely like to know and understand how IGG, FrogLube, and SlipStream differ. All three of these describe their ability to penetrate and soak into “the pores of the metal.” Going by that description alone, one might think they are equal products.

        So how you different, or better, and what’s really going on with the references to metal and pores?

        • Drew

          By pores, I do believe he is referring to small pores at the molecular level. Still, I would like to hear his explanation of this concept.

          • Very true Drew. If the molecules are small enough they can indeed fit/drop into these pits and stay for some time depending on the qualities of the lube.

        • Cornelius Carroll

          I work for a company that manufactures products for CST installation. Our products need to be in the field more or less maintenance free for 20+ years. Corrosion is a very important issue for us. I can tell you emphatically that metals are porus. There’s two ways to look at this.

          The first is conventionally at which point I’d like to point out that hydrogen can tunnel through solid steel (this is THE biggest issue with hydrogen fueling anything, the tanks are constantly leaking)

          The second is surface roughness at which point “pits” is the correct term and not pores. Depending on the size of the pits and a lot of other rather esoteric factors some lubricants will reside within the pits and some will not.

        • Jim it’s very true that metals do have pores so to speak and some lubricants with molecules small enough to drop into these pores. There is a great deal of benefit from products that are able to do this. The term pores is more of a layman’s term.
          I posted a photo several months ago of a piece of 4140 steel being seen with an electron microscope and you could clearly see these “pores”.

      • PaulD

        Aaron, regarding “penetrate into the metal”, if it’s possible for a petro-chemical compound to penetrate steel in any way, why doesn’t gasoline leak out of a steel gas can?

      • unclejosh

        Guys – I am a chemist with a background in polymers, ceramics, and metals and failure analysis. I

        Re.
        IGG: as others have pointed out, this is an apples to giraffes test,
        thin synthetic or paraffin oils vs. a grease. You don’t need a Ph.D. to
        see that the shear forces, friction, and centrifugal forces are goes to
        smoke a thin oil and fling it off as well…

        I also
        suggest that carbon based lubricants, whether from a plant, barrel of
        oil, or from a lab, typically have no affinity for metal surfaces (oxide
        except for gold) and that oils will not migrate into pores unless there
        is a driving force to do that. Chemist can chemically modify metal
        surfaces to achieve that, as well as the lubricants
        themselves……maybe the IGG chemists have done that themselves or
        maybe this is a repackaged lubricant that is so common in the industry.

        Aaron
        – I know you are trying to make a living selling this stuff, but I must
        say that I would never buy a firearms product that has a stereotype of
        an Italian mobster and a machine gun on the label. This kind of
        marketing hurts the gun industry,as it aligns your product with a
        historical criminal element, and does Italian folks a disservice. Maybe
        some punks that shoot a pistol sideways like in the movies would be
        attracted to it.

        The IGG website and literature also states that this is a “weapon(s)” lubricant. The most basic tenants of firearm ideology and NRA policy and logic and reason dictate that firearms are not weapons unless they are used as one. Ex: a hammer is a tool. It can be used as a weapon. FACT: more hammers kill people than firearms on an annual basis.

        Your companies literature and marketing harms the gun industry and responsible shooters, especially at this critical juncture where the whole sport is under attack via legislative bodies.

        I conclude by saying that if IGG is a technically superior product, back it up with real data and not a badly compromised video with lame-ass dramatic music and some stooges in lab coats.

        Keep it simple, and stay with tried and true products.

    • Sentry does advise a light coating in the barrel as does Frog Lube

  • jpcmt

    Because of others below mentioning that this is a bogus test because it does not represent the type of viscosity a firearm goes through (except maybe automatic weapons on a battlefield), and because this is a grease vs. oil comparison, there’s nothing here to watch. Experiment with something similating a handgun slide using IGG vs. white lithium grease vs. TWB50 vs. frog lub grease, etc. etc. Then you’ll have something to peak interest.

    • bbmg

      *pique

      • jpcmt

        yeah that! thanks!

  • Keith

    I believe grease in rifle barrels has already been tried… Anybody heard of Mobilubricant in the ’03 Springfield?

    • That was just for packing wasn’t it?

      • Keith

        No, they dipped the standard (at that time) cupro-nickel bullets in Mobiluricant to reduce fouling. They blew up several Springfields by doing this strange practice, and a pressure test revealed 10-15 % pressure spikes over normal loads. If you want to read more, the 2010 Gun Digest has an excellent article on it called “The Age of Mobilubricant.” It might be online as well – I’m not sure.

  • Soless

    I am ready to try this on my handguns. I want to see how well it works under practicle shooting conditions. Will it mix with carbon residue and gum up? Will it soften up or run off when it heats up? I aim to find out for myself. And I don’t reallly care to run it through my barrel on any of my rifles or guns. My rounds are already consistant. I don’t want to mess that up.

  • Nicholas Mew

    And if you are really desperate, Canola Oil.

  • Joe Schmoe

    Is there any chance for international shipping in the near future.

    I’m in Israel (IDF reserves) and I wouldn’t mind doing a personal comparison next time I go in on the reliability between your oil and the standard military one (which is very, very good).

  • Roper1911

    I’d like to see Italian Gun Grease hold up against Slipstream Styx.

  • Curtis

    This stuff reminds me of ER or Energy Release. It was and engine oil additive that was supposed to have been developed by the Simplot Corporation in the late 80’s or so. The salesman used the same test machine when giving their sales pitch.

  • michael

    I plan on trying some.

  • PaulD

    Some people advocate motor oil as an alternative to regular gun oils. This makes sense given cost and that motor oil does seem more effective than regular gun oils (at least at lubrication, at rust prevention I’m not so sure). All oils have the problem that they migrate to the outside of the gun. Sometimes grease works well for the bolt roller on an M1A or the slides on some pistols. However, I’ve seen cases in cold weather where the grease prevented cycling until the gun was warmed up.

    My question is, has anyone tried motorcycle chain lube on a gun? The environment and problem seems pretty similar to me. They’re open devices where there’s some heat but not a ridiculous amount and the lube needs to stay put and not attract dirt. Chain lube is also fairly cheap compared to gun oil. Any thoughts or experience?

  • I guess if my firearms spun around pressed against some metal bar with weights on them these tests would be relevant.

    • unclejosh

      Guys – I am a chemist with a background in polymers, ceramics, and metals and failure analysis. I

      Re. IGG: as others have pointed out, this is an apples to giraffes test, thin synthetic or paraffin oils vs. a grease. You don’t need a Ph.D. to see that the shear forces, friction, and centrifugal forces are goes to smoke a thin oil and fling it off as well…

      I also suggest that carbon based lubricants, whether from a plant, barrel of oil, or from a lab, typically have no affinity for metal surfaces (oxide except for gold) and that oils will not migrate into pores unless there is a driving force to do that. Chemist can chemically modify metal surfaces to achieve that, as well as the lubricants themselves……maybe the IGG chemists have done that themselves or maybe this is a repackaged lubricant that is so common in the industry.

      Aaron – I know you are trying to make a living selling this stuff, but I must say that I would never buy a firearms product that has a stereotype of an Italian mobster and a machine gun on the label. This kind of marketing hurts the gun industry,as it aligns your product with a historical criminal element, and does Italian folks a disservice. Maybe some punks that shoot a pistol sideways like in the movies would be attracted to it.

      I conclude by saying that if IGG is a technically superior product, back it up with real data and not a badly compromised video with lame-ass dramatic music and some stooges in lab coats.

      Keep it simple, and stay with tried and true products.

  • Davdberg

    so, what is the breaking force for italian gun grease. And how does the applied forceor load translate into gun wear (equivalent number shots per calibre). It would have been nicer if they torture tested a same firearm being lubed/greased with the above products and other greases too.

  • SD

    Probably not smart to use a gangster as a company logo…

  • Gabe former IGG rep

    When is anyone going to ask who Modern Spartan is and what copyright did IGG violate. Check out http://www.ubcus.com/mss to find out.