Ruger 10/22 Laser from LaserMax

LaserMax 10/22

LaserMax is now making a special red laser aiming unit for the Ruger 10/22.  The unit mounts onto a 10/22 rifle by removing the stock barrel band and then sliding the laser unit down the barrel and into the barrel band’s old place.

According to Ruger, the laser is pre-aligned at 25 yards and is visible to 100 yards in good lighting conditions.  The laser aiming point is completely adjustable for windage and elevation.

LaserMax 10/22

The unit has two short Picatinny rails on either side of the laser.  Feel free to kit up.  The 1/3N battery is supposed to be good for two hours of continuous run time.

The new unit is sold only through Ruger, but carries a full five-year LaserMax warranty.  MSRP is $129.95.

Related

Richard Johnson

An advocate of gun proliferation zones, Richard is a long time shooter, former cop and internet entrepreneur. Among the many places he calls home is http://www.gunsholstersandgear.com/.


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  • Simon

    This looks great. I am glad it doesn’t mess up the lines of the rifle too much.
    For a 5 year guarantee it looks like a good value aswell.

  • http://www.facebook.com/nick.ootes Nick Ootes

    Nice and low profile, great for a takedown

  • Cuban Pete

    $130 laser on a $200 rifle??? I don’t think so!!

    • http://www.facebook.com/jonathan.wright.1422 Jonathan Wright

      if you can find me a $200 dollar 10/22, I’ll buy them all.

      • dupkaman

        Check out Dicks….they frequently sell it for below $200

  • mikee

    The trouble with lasers is that the laser light is in a straight line while a projectile trajectory is curved. Useless for precision shots!

    • Tre

      Your line of sight from any optic is also a straight line.

      My 10/22 is a “fun gun” and this add-on seems in line with that goal. I do think the price point is just a tad bit high.

    • RocketScientist

      By your logic, every optical aiming aid (iron sights, red-dots, scopes, etc) would also be ‘useless’ as they all only work at one set distance. This laser sight is (just like scopes, iron sights, red-dots, and the rest) adjustable for windage/elevation allowing you to change its point of aim to match your ammunitions trajectory at a specific range. BDC reticles and graduated sights take this easier, but short of some of the newer computer-controlled electronic digital optics than automatically adjust for environmental conditions and range to match the projectile trajectory, every visual aiming device requires some form of change/manipulation (whether changing sight picture in a BDC reticule, or doping a scope, or elevating graduated iron sights, etc) to make them accurate at more than just one specific range. Even the high-speed fancy computer ones are making those adjustments… theyre just doing it without any user input. And for 99% of what people use a 10-22 for (plinking, small-game hunting within 50 yds, etc) I think this is a good match. Zero it at 25 yds, it’d be within an inch or so out to 50 yds (not a hard number, just a SWAG based on playing with zero’s on my .22 bolt-action). Great for quick snap shots on cans or rabbits. The price however…

      • mikee

        I’m amused by the lengthy response to
        my summary in two sentences regarding laser targeting devices for
        small arms. Having been exposed to both military and civilian
        applications using laser technology for target acquisition for a
        considerable period of time and comparing the results to telescopes
        has raised more issues on the utility of lazer sights than addressed
        the shortcomings of telescopic sights or open metallic sights. Laser
        sights have not been the panecea as they were touted to be decades
        ago when first introduced for targeting. They may have lately found
        some application at very short ranges ie under 50 meters, with
        pistols, revolvers and some shotguns, but other than that, they can
        be placed in the category of a “novelty” item as one of the other
        readers has so succinctly pointed out. Where lasers have performed
        well is in range finding – but that is a another topic. No major
        optics manufacture has seriously invested large amounts of time,
        engineering, science and money in developing laser technology to the
        point that it has seriously challenged the civilian and military
        market to adopt lasers as a primary targeting device for good reason.
        That may change when directed beam weapons become an affordable
        reality. Until then, stick to telescopic optics and open metallic
        sights, even for plinking.

    • bozo connors

      This is a .22, not a 155mm artillery round. I’m much less concerned with trajectory than with where the actual hit point is. How far exactly are you planning to shoot?!

      • mikee

        One is dependent on the other. As one
        gunny once said – “only hits count”.

    • Felix

      Um…your logic only applies if you are somehow aiming at something so far away that you couldn’t adjust the elevation of the laser low enough to account for the ballistic path. You’re not shooting a longbow here, partner.

      • mikee

        No, you’re right, but I have shot the 105 mm L7A1 tank gun (used on Leopard and M60 tanks) at nearly 3K on numerous occassions where “lasering” became marginal.

    • crankyfool

      Forget the fact this is true about optics — ANY sighting system, including iron sights, will have exactly the same “problem.”

      • mikee

        Not necessarily, active systems such as laser systems have other issues that passive systems such as optical sights do not necessarily have and vice versa.

    • mikee

      I’m amused by the lengthy response to
      my summary in two sentences regarding laser targeting devices for
      small arms. Having been exposed to both military and civilian
      applications using laser technology for target acquisition for a
      considerable period of time and comparing the results to telescopes
      has raised more issues on the utility of lazer sights than addressed
      the shortcomings of telescopic sights or open metallic sights. Laser
      sights have not been the panecea as they were touted to be decades
      ago when first introduced for targeting. They may have lately found
      some application at very short ranges ie under 50 meters, with
      pistols, revolvers and some shotguns, but other than that, they can
      be placed in the category of a “novelty” item as one of the other
      readers has so succinctly pointed out. Where lasers have performed
      well is in range finding – but that is a another topic. No major
      optics manufacture has seriously invested large amounts of time,
      engineering, science and money in developing laser technology to the
      point that it has seriously challenged the civilian and military
      market to adopt lasers as a primary targeting device for good reason.
      That may change when directed beam weapons become an affordable
      reality. Until then, stick to telescopic optics and open metallic
      sights, even for plinking.

  • Sean

    I hand a front sling swivel on the stock barrel band, as I have mine setup as a “Liberty Training Rifle”. I could always tap a new swivel stud I suppose…

    • http://profiles.google.com/chrontius Chrome Dragon

      Or add a sling swivel – quick detach or otherwise – to the picatinny rail of your choice. Or both, and make it reversible. Or put a scoutlight on the far side, because it’s never too early to make the point that “know what you’re shooting at, even in the dark” is important (if I understand your “liberty training rifle” correctly).

      • cbibb

        This would be great on a challenger awsome varmint gun and still able to scope it.

  • Criticalthinkingiscritical

    I understand why people put lasers on self defense pistols, rifles, and shotguns. I have a laser on my XD45.

    For non-self defense firearms I don’t see the point. Especially for a plinker/small game gun like a 10/22.

    Is it purely for the novelty of having a laser on your gun?

    • bozo connors

      Not sure of the practicality myself. Though, you could shave the sights off I guess (?)

    • http://twitter.com/Leo_Atrox Leo Atrox

      “Especially for a plinker,” you don’t see the point of a “novelty”? What is the point of plinking at all, if not for fun? And what enhances fun more than novelty?

      As for being a non-self defense firearm, I’m not sure a quick-firing and nearly-recoilless little carbine is entirely unsuitable for self-defense. Would it be my first choice? No. But I sure wouldn’t want to get shot by a single round s of .22LR, much less 25.

      • Criticalthinkingiscritical

        I didn’t say I that I don’t see the point of novelty, I was asking if novelty was the point. On the list of novelty items I would add to my 10/22 a laser would not even be on the list, similar to how a VFG and pistol grip also aren’t on my list, hence my question. On a .22lr AR style gun like the M&P15-22 sure, but not on a 10/22.

        On the topic of self defense, if someone can afford to purchase a 10/22 and a laser they can afford to purchase a real self defense gun. If they truly can’t afford to buy both a 10/22 and a $300 shotgun then IMO they can’t really afford to spend $130 on a laser. I don’t want to be shot by any kind of firearm in any caliber, but am not willing to gamble on .22lr for self defense as a primary or even secondary self defense weapon.

        • Theo Brinkman

          Saw a deal from a local FFL recently where you could get a synthetic stock 10/22 carbine with the laser for $275. The going rate for a bare 10/22 carbine in my area is about $250.

          My plans, when I get one, are to set the laser to be parallel to the barrel, and use it and a scope as a combined range-finder. (Depending on the range, the laser’s dot will be below or above the horizontal center line of the scope. With some testing to figure out the calibration, a decent range estimate can be had as a result.

    • joelferguson

      I know I’m a little late to this discussion, but a 10/22 is a great light weight, accurate, nil recoil return to target standoff firearm that can reach out to 200yards (and more on a good day). Granted, it wouldn’t be right for all situations and some would call for a higher caliber like an SKS or AR, but I wouldn’t sneeze at a 10/22 and would take a 10/22 with a high cap mag over a hand gun of any caliber anyday/any situation.

  • Felix

    I’d probably leave my 10/22 naked, as the whole reason I shoot it is the fun and challenge of plinking away with iron sights. But, if I were to get a Takedown…this might find its purpose (if I found and extra $130).

  • Cymond

    This would be nice on the new takedown 10/22, but what percentage of the 10/22 market keeps the factory stock?

  • Laser Guru

    Hi Group,

    My name is Brandon and I work for the customer service department at LaserMax. It is very encouraging to see all of the discussions you have been having about our lasers and any and all of the feedback is highly appreciated. In an effort to put some of the discussions and questions in order, I decided to comment on this thread to offer up some advice and ideas to those who are reading this.

    One of the comments I noticed had to deal with the projectile trajectory vs. how it can be used with a laser. While a laser will give you a straight line and defined aiming point at a set distance, a bullet will follow no such path and will adjust its course based on a number of outside shooting conditions, with gravity being the main force here. While a visible laser may not be practical at extreme long ranges, the nature of the .22 round is meant for many closer engagements and a small hunting or “plinking” rifle. Setting the laser at 25 or 50 yards will give you a great deal of flexibility engaging targets at those distances with very little deviation in the bullet’s path. Another thing to consider: based on a person’s eyesight and the kind of shooting conditions they are operating within, there is a finite distance in which the laser will remain visible. The distance at which the beam becomes hard to see is typically beyond most engagement ranges that an average shooter would find themselves using a .22 rifle.

    While a laser may not cover every area of aiming for a rifle, one thing they do exceptionally well is increase the speed at which a person can identify and engage a target. For a target shooter, plinker, or hunter, this speed is invaluable and adds a new aspect to your shooting game. While using and being proficient with iron sights is always of the utmost importance, some situations simply do not allow for this to happen. I know that identifying and engaging a target can happen in mere seconds and a laser makes this process much more efficient, removing the time needed to address factors such as cheek weld and correct sight alignment.

    On an entirely fun note, while a laser will not fill every need a shooter may have, I can say that they certainly do a great job of making shooting more enjoyable. For a new shooter or someone looking for a change of pace, having a laser is a great option and one that will give your shooting game a completely different aspect. After all, isn’t the purpose of a .22 all about enjoying the sport and the humble beginnings where most of us first started learning marksmanship?

    I hope this helps cover some of the issues discussed and I am happy to hear so many of you are engaged in this conversation and interested in our product. If you have any additional questions, I can be reached directly at bmorabito@lasermax.com or, please feel free to call me at 1-800-527-3703 ex. 332.

    Thank you and happy shooting!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Zius-Patagus/747170900 Zius Patagus

    I know this generation is kind of conditioned to accept the inflated cost of just about anything gun related but that thing is about $100 too high. Yeah I know, it has Ruger’s name on it. Yeah I know it is a designer label and is specially made for the 10/22. Seems like an expensive toy for the stupid and gullible. Lots of cheaper alternatives available.

    • Theo Brinkman

      I’m curious. Where can you find a laser that is designed to be mountable, is precisely adjustable for windage and elevation, and has brightness sufficient for use as a sight for $29.95? Hook me up with a source, and I’ll make a fortune selling them on eBay for $45, shipping included.

  • OldFarmerJohn

    I hung one on my 10/22 takedown for varmints chasing my critters in the back yard. I’ve lost over $500.00 in critters to bobcats and coyotes in one year so for me the cost is negligible if my wife can hit the varmint with it. I also hung a $400 Leupold scope on it so that I can see what the heck is downrange before I pull the trigger. Old eyes, etc. I bought a second one for my 10/22 carbine so the grandkids can play. That way I can see exactly where they’re aiming at before I tell them it’s okay to pull the trigger.
    mikee, quit being a #@#$.