Shield FastFinder Red Dot Mount for Cameras (Hot-Shoe)

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Shield is a European manufacturer of red dot sight and optic mounts. They are the OEM manufacturer of the JPoint Reflex Sight, Trijicon RedDot and Tasco Optima sights. The company has developed a mount for their red dot sights which allow them to be mounted on digital cameras. The mount attaches to cameras via the Hot Shoe mount point that is normally used to attach flash units. It does not obscure the camera’s optical viewfinder.

I am not a photographer but I assume this would be useful for sports photography or other situations where speed is required.

Many thanks to Dom for the photo.




Steve Johnson

Founder and Dictator-In-Chief of TFB. A passionate gun owner, a shooting enthusiast and totally tacti-uncool. Favorite first date location: any gun range. Steve can be contacted here.


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  • Mobious

    I’ve seen these before and really wanted to find out where/how to get a hold of one but could never find any leads. Thanks for the post, they are really just tacticool add ons but for longer lenses it can really help with getting the camera pointed at your target first then get all close in.

    • http://www.thefirearmblog.com/ Phil W “Senior Writer TFB”

      I’d start by calling some of the leading tripos makers. They could at least tell you where to find them.
      There are also some double sided adhesive squares about 1×1 in size that will not come off.

    • http://www.facebook.com/max.kingsbury Max Kingsbury

      That makes sense. Whenever I’m birding with a 300mm+ lens, I have a tendency to see the bird with my naked eye, pick up the camera, look through it, then think “wait, where was he again?”

  • scw

    There has been people who DIY similar device to mount reflex sight on telescope for bird watching. But I really doubted how useful it really is as such example are quite rare.

    • LJK

      I could imagine that would actually be very useful if you’re using any kind of high magnification prime lense (something like 300mm and up). It can’t be all that easy to spot something far away and instinctively point your camera (or telescope) to that small point and expect to have a bird in frame.

      With a red dot on top of your camera, just put the dot on the bird, look through the viewfinder. Done, take your picture.

      • noob

        hmm. diy? i wonder if some horrible duct tape and superglue jobs are out there… if anyone has/wants to make a camera with a home made red dot mount please post pics and reviews?

  • http://twitter.com/blakedotfr Blake

    A lot will depend on the cost & weight. A quality hotshoe optical finder can cost $400+ and add a lot of weight & bulk to the camera.

    But for a reflex site I imagine that they’d have a field of view equivalent to a ~50mm lens. Folks are usually looking for wide-angle finders for street photography in the 24 to 35mm range.

  • Raoul O’Shaughnessy

    Tacticamera..I mean, tacticool

  • http://twitter.com/tahDeetz Deetz

    This would be quite useful in sports photography.

  • vecdran

    Very cool, but specific, piece of hardware.

  • Thatguy

    I can see this being useful for a 400mm+ lens. However, that lens looks nothing like the lens pictured above. That’s just dumb.

    • David Hinerman

      I disagree. Shooting action that’s moving across the field of view can be tricky with even a short tele lens, if your camera has an optical viewfinder instead of a screen. (And with my eyes, even a screen can be hard to follow.)

  • RT

    So a second optical viewfinder with no camera functionality. Totally pointless. A Zacuto Z-Finder would be a much better option.

  • http://www.shieldpsd.com/ Shield PSD

    Sorry you have found these difficult to find. Please contact us via the Shield website http://shieldpsd.sharepoint.com/Pages/Fastfinder.aspx