SI Shock Buffer For Pistols

shock_buffer_10

Strike Industries has developed a polyurethane buffer for Glock, M&P and Springfield XD and XDM pistols. The buffer softens recoil when the slide cycles. I have used this type of buffer on semi-automatic rifles for many years, but this is the first time I have ever seen buffers available for pistols.

 

The Shock Buffer will retail for $10 and will be available in March.

 




Steve Johnson

Founder and Dictator-In-Chief of TFB. A passionate gun owner, a shooting enthusiast and totally tacti-uncool. Favorite first date location: any gun range. Steve can be contacted here.


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  • Ian

    Wilson Combat has sold buffers for pistols for many years. Pistols are a bit more sensitive to shortening their cycling length and as such usually suffer more reliability issues from soft buffers.

    • Criticalthinkingiscritical

      I came here to say the same thing.

      I’ve been using buffers for at least seven years in my 1911.

      • AG

        I would say out of anything else, 1911’s are most “sensitive” than most other handguns. I know some Glocks don’t like weapon lights, but adding buffers don’t seem to affect how they operate other than limp wristing that may occur after that.

        • Criticalthinkingiscritical

          I completely agree. Though my Springfield TRP is very reliable overall it requires much more maintenance than any of my Springfield XD’s.

          I’ve also seen two 1911’s with frame damage caused by the slide impact. Whereas I’ve never heard of a similar incident with XD’s or Glocks (or any other pistol for that matter). Both 1911’s were very high end $2k+ models that had seen extensive law enforcement related use.

  • Esh325

    I’ve tried buffers a few times before for rifles, they are mostly gimmicks.

  • Adam

    If the guns needed buffers, they’d come from the factory with them. DO NOT BUY THESE.

    • Esh325

      Agreed. PPS43 has a buffer because it was designed with one internally.

    • Jimmy

      Go ask professional USPSA guys. They all use buffers on their Glocks.

      • Chris Rhines

        Uh-huh. Which professional USPSA guys, exactly? I don’t, and none of the other pro shooters I know of use buffers.

    • Criticalthinkingiscritical

      So every single after market part for every single gun is a “DO NOT BUY” then?

      Dang; I’ll have to throw away my sound suppressors holographic sights, most of my magazines, pretty much half of my AR, the match grade barrel on my 10/22, and a ton of other stuff too. Such a bummer.

  • Case

    If you bought a gun that needs a two cent plastic part to improve the handling characteristics then you wasted your money on both the part and the gun. Either this thing is a ridiculous gimmick or your firearm is garbage. Maybe Browning didn’t put one in his original design because he didn’t have polymers, but for a modern firearm? Gimme a break.

    Most likely this thing is a useless gimmick. It may or may not reduce felt recoil, but it definitely wasn’t designed and tested by the manufacturer and you are much more likely to suffer from reliability issues associated with short-cycling.

  • WhaWho

    Used these for many years on 1911s that got heavy range rental use. They did help extend the life of frames. http://shopwilsoncombat.com/Shok-Buff/products/78/
    YMMMV

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=779775130 Christian Hedegaard-Schou

    The biggest problem with these buffers is that they wear out and break down. They fall to pieces and those pieces jam up the action of the firearm. DO NOT use them. They are worthless.

    • SI

      If the buffers broken or wear out, they will not jam your gun. Your gun will still cycle well like nothing happened. We did the test already. (worst case scenario test.)

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=779775130 Christian Hedegaard-Schou

        Except they do jam up guns. I’ve seen it and experienced it myself. Just because you weren’t able to replicate it doesn’t mean it can’t happen.

    • Criticalthinkingiscritical

      They do wear and break down. However if you’re doing proper maintenance of your guns it will be easily avoided simply by observing the state of the buffer and replacing it when needed. That might be a problem for the “Glocks run forever without maintenance” crowd but not for anyone else.

      They are not worthless. I’ve seen 1911’s suffer frame damage due to the slide impact on the frame.

  • Viggen

    I’m not sure it is wise to shorten the cycling length by any amount, If the manufacturer did not design it that way don’t mess with it. Now, HK does utilize a nylon buffer as part of their recoil reduction system BY DESIGN on some pistols, however the buffer sits on the recoil spring assembly itself (pic below). I do believe the full size USP, Mark 23 and P2000sk use dual-spring recoil systems without the nylon buffers.

    Nylon Buffer shown on HK45c Recoil Spring Assembly
    http://www.hkparts.net/shop/pc/HK-USP-45C-HK45C-Recoil-Spring-Assembly-213p1457.htm

  • 2Wheels

    Someone will buy them, just like people buy them already for 1911s.

    But if they’re anything like the ones on the market for the 1911, they’re of limited usefulness, potentially cause failures and can break apart inside the gun, again potentially causing a failure.

    Buy ‘em if it makes you feel better, put them on your range toys and competition guns. But IMHO keep them out of your defensive guns!

    • Criticalthinkingiscritical

      I’m a big fan of these in 1911’s but definitely don’t put them in my defensive guns.

  • John

    DPM Buffer is the only non-oem pistol buffer system I trust.

  • Delta

    All i can say just get it and try for yourself , i did on my G34 , G17 and G35 it works great .

    I shoot IPSC and Steel matches twice a months for sometime now , had thousands of rounds thru it , it haven’t fail yet .

    • Strike Industries

      Only people shoot a lot can tell the difference, Sir. :)

      • Criticalthinkingiscritical

        Not true. Everyone I’ve ever taken shooting for the first time has noticed the difference in feel between my 1911 that doesn’t have one and the one that does.

  • Joseph

    If it were five or seven dollars I would think it was worth a try; be a thing. But it’s just not ten dollars. Is it?

    • Strike Industries

      It will be around $5 each.

  • Istillhavebotheyes

    The “SafeArmsReview” youtube channel might reconsider their name if they are going to show shooting steel targets with no eye protection.

    • Criticalthinkingiscritical

      Glad I wasn’t the only one who thought that.