Bersa BP9 conceal carry pistol: now shipping

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I had my first introduction to Bersa today, and when I asked them about what was new for 2013 they pointed me to the BP9cc. This 3.3″ barreled pistol was announced a few months ago, so the only thing “new” is that they are now shipping. More information about the BP9cc is here on their site.

One feature that struck me as odd was the active-safety in the form of a screw on the back side of the slide.

The safety key fits into the small hex screw on the slide. There are the expected "F" and "S" positions.

The safety key fits into the small hex screw on the slide. There are the expected “F” and “S” positions.

My initial reaction was confusion and wondered why anyone would want a tool to manipulate the safety? The answer they provided is let’s say you come home and you take your carry pistol off your person but you don’t want to unload it. If you have kids in the house and want to put it on a stand or drawer then you can engage the safety with the key. Not sure if that’s a feature I would want on my carry pistol, but perhaps it’s one you would?

www.Bersa.com.

Chris Cheng is History Channel’s Top Shot Season 4 champion. A self-taught amateur turned pro through his Top Shot win, Cheng very much still considers himself an amateur who parachuted into this new career. He shares his thoughts and experiences from the perspective of a newbie to the shooting community. www.TopShotChris.com.

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Chris Cheng

Chris Cheng is History Channel’s Top Shot Season 4 champion. A self-taught amateur (and former Googler) turned pro through his Top Shot win, Cheng very much still considers himself an amateur who parachuted into this new career.

He is a professional marksman for Bass Pro Shops who shares his thoughts and experiences from the perspective of a newbie to the shooting community. www.TopShotChris.com.



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  • Cashel111

    that key safety feature is brilliant, provided it doesn’t interfere with general usage, the more features the better if they are intrusive and doesn’t add too much to the price. if you dont want it you can buy the gun for other reasons and not use it

  • wareagle

    The safety key is a great idea untill the one day you forget to lock it and it goes off in your kids ‘hands. Put it in a safe if you have kids,

    • totenglocke

      Or it’s a great idea until the one day you actually have a burglar and you can’t find the bloody key to unlock it and you get shot while trying to unlock the gun. Whether it’s in place of the safety or an extra lock on the gun, I see locks such as that as a fatality waiting to happen.

  • gunslinger

    I haven’t been a fan of the “keyed” safeties. i have thoughts of locking it, then losing the key.

    but i see where it’s coming from.

    i have the thunder 380 and it has that key on the side. i keep mine on F and that’s about it.

  • Kurt

    That’s not a safety; it’s a lock. Loaded guns should not be locked. What good is a loaded gun if it’s locked? Conversely, why would a locked gun be kept loaded? Small keys get lost and are hard to operate or handle safely when the adrenaline is flowing. Your hands need to keep that gun under control, not fumble around with keys.

    Besides, anybody who puts a gun where small kids can get at it is a first-class idiot (and we all know Cooper’s first rule, that a gun is ALWAYS loaded, right?). That would be as stupid as locking it, then putting the thing up against your head and squeezing the trigger. A lock can fail, or you might forget to lock it. Internal locks and trigger locks are nothing more than safety hazards. Keep loaded guns on your person or in a safe place at all times. If you don’t need your gun for immediate self-defense, keep it unloaded, cleared and in a safe place. If you’re traveling and don’t have a safe place to store your gun, take a lock box “safe” or at least a cable lock that prevents the gun from going into battery. If you are so negligent that you need an internal lock for “safety”, you should do us all a favor and sell all your guns right now.

    The Bersas are otherwise nice guns, especially for the money, and unfortunately even later model Smith and Wessons have internal locks. The best thing to do with one of these locks is to ignore it and keep it unlocked, then hope that it doesn’t malfunction and lock up the gun when the gun is supposed to fire. Unlikely, maybe, but something to keep in mind in a defensive weapon.

  • Ducky

    I picked up my Thunder 380 for a wish and a song, and I since it was so inexpensive I use it as my car gun. In AZ there aren’t any requirements. Whenever I go somewhere that makes me disarm (sadly, my workplace is a gun free zone) I lock the gun and toss it in my glove box. It is inexpensive enough that if stolen, I’ll only be a little sad, but with it locked I’ll give the jerkwad who stole it a hard time (its not impossible to get a new key, just takes a few dollars and a few days).

  • Edward

    I think its a california thing,My lc9 has the same type locking function,Its for my nany state.I’m not proud:{

  • falnfenix

    the key is far from new for Bersa. my 7-year-old Firestorm came with one. i’ve never locked it.

  • 101st

    I have a Bersa Thunder .380, have the key on my key ring, never lock the pistol. I just keep the lock key in case the pistol does something stupid, like, lock itself. Nice lil pistol, big enough to fit in hand, without being snappy.