Surgeon Rifle: Remedy .338 Lapua Magnum

20121106_123105-540x405

Even though I won Top Shot Season 4 and a pro shooting contract with Bass Pro Shops, my self-taught amateurness is often still on fully display. I recently tested the Remedy .338 Lapua Magnum by Surgeon Rifles, both with and without a suppressor. For those of you who are well skilled in rifle shooting, you may get a good laugh at some of the rookie mistakes I made on my day out at the range. It’s a learning experience, and lucky for me I like to learn whether it’s through my own mistakes, or through intelligent readers such as yourselves.

The Surgeon “Remedy” in .338 Lapua Magnum. Nightforce scope, Harris bi-pod, and wine not included.

I drove 2 hours to my closest long distance range where I shot out to 600 yards. As to be expected, I met some really nice folks. When I set up my rifle, my first mistake was not having a stool as I assumed that they would have stools. My second mistake was that I forgot my shooting mat at home, so guess I wasn’t shooting prone! Thankfully, the R.O. had a spare stool so I was all set. I knew the Nightforce NXS 5.5-22×56 scope was zeroed in at 100 yards, but I had forgotten to check to see if the scope used hash marks or mil dots, and then looking up ahead of time what the corresponding hold would be at 600 yards. The Nightforce had mil dots, and thankfully the other shooters were kind enough to give me an approximate hold to get me on paper and walk it in.

View of the effective muzzle brake.

View of the folding buttstock.

The Remedy comes with a 5-round magazine, and has a very smooth action with an oversized bolt handle. I held my first sighting shot four hash marks below level, and broke the shot. The trigger was feather light, which I loved. The trigger had minimal pre and post travel, and I was able to easily rack another round while staying on target. I saw my target come up from the pit, and there was no marker, indicating I had completely missed. The R.O. asked me what my hold was, and he recommended I drop down another two hash marks. My next shot was on paper. I walked it in with eight more shots and was getting consistent groups. My other mistake was not bringing a sandbag or a rear support for the buttstock, so it was challenging to keep a steady hold on the bench. I was using my fist as a support.

Once I was dialed in I shot two, 5-round groups. My first group was 6.5 inches, and my second group was 4 inches. Not too shabby. A few months prior, I shot this same rifle with a suppressor and can report that it was very effective in reducing recoil and report. The suppressor took the .338 Lapua recoil down to something around a low recoil 12 gauge shotgun round.

All in all, the Surgeon is a beaut to shoot, and I can’t wait until I get to one again. If you’re in the market for a high end rifle, take a look at Surgeon.

Surgeon sells directly to consumers, and proudly supports the United States military. The base price of the Surgeon Remedy is $5,400. Other models and calibers are also available. www.surgeonrifles.com.

Chris Cheng is History Channel’s Top Shot Season 4 champion. A self-taught amateur turned pro through his Top Shot win, Cheng very much still considers himself an amateur who parachuted into this new career. He shares his thoughts and experiences from the perspective of a newbie to the shooting community. www.TopShotChris.com.




Chris Cheng

Chris Cheng is History Channel’s Top Shot Season 4 champion, author of “Shoot to Win,” and an NRA News Commentator. A self-taught amateur (and former Googler) turned pro through his Top Shot win, Cheng very much still considers himself an amateur who parachuted into this new career.

He is a professional marksman for Bass Pro Shops who shares his thoughts and experiences from the perspective of a newbie to the shooting community. www.TopShotChris.com.


Advertisement