Barnes TAC-XPD Coming 2013

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Barnes will introduce their new TAC-XPD line of all-copper defensive ammunition in 2013.

Designed for law enforcement and personal defense, TAC-XP pistol bullets retain nearly 100% of their original weight and track straight. Performance through bare gel, light and heavy clothing, car doors, plywood and automotive windshield glass is unmatched by the competition.

The lighter bullet weights of all-copper TAC-XP projectiles in comparison to lead-core counterparts enable the shooter to recover quickly due to less felt recoil, without sacrificing terminal performance. Specially engineered loads produce almost no muzzle flash – an important feature in low-light conditions. Distinctive Techni-Crom plated shells feed smoothly from the magazine for reliability shooters can depend on every time.

The 380 Auto 80 grain TAC-XP, 9mm Luger 115 grain TAC-XP +P, .40 S&W 140 grain TAC-XP and .45 Auto 185 grain TAC-XP +P loads will go on sale in early 2013.

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Steve Johnson

Founder and Dictator-In-Chief of TFB. A passionate gun owner, a shooting enthusiast and totally tacti-uncool. Favorite first date location: any gun range. Steve can be contacted here.


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  • Esh325

    Maybe I’m reading it wrong, but how does a bullet being made out of all copper reduce recoil?

    • bbmg

      It’s lighter than a lead bullet, simple as that.

      • Chase

        How is 185 grains of copper lighter than 185 grains of lead? Or is the grain not a unit of mass, and I’ve been wrong all this time? Stupid English measurements…

      • bbmg

        1 gram is 15.43 grains, perhaps they were comparing the recoil to more traditional 200-230 grain 45 ACP loads?

    • FormerSFMedic

      What they are comparing the all copper bullets to are lead bullets in traditional weights. Take for example the 40 S&W load. Traditional 40 loads with lead bullets weigh 180, 165, 155, and 135 grains. The Barnes all copper bullets for 40 S&W weigh 140 grains. Now, the all copper Barnes bullets are not equal to the 40 S&W loads in the same weight. In other words, the 140 grain Barnes bullet performs on par with the 165 or 155 grain lead bullets where penetration is concerned. That’s the big point here.

      • Esh325

        That makes a lot more sense, thanks. Do you think an all copper rifle bullet would provide any advantage?

      • bbmg

        http://www.hunt101.com/data/500/medium/bullet_compare.JPG

        Long range shooters seem to think so ;)

        Note that from left, the first bullet which is jacketed lead weighs as much as the fourth solid copper bullet.

      • FormerSFMedic

        @Esh325- Absolutely! The Barnes Triple Shock bullets for rifles perform extremely well. I know a lot of hunters that won’t use anything else on game. I have seen the X bullet drop deer, elk, and coyotes with one shot. I mean dead where they stand. No tracking through the woods or desert! They seem to be more accurate and much more effective on target than lead core bullets. They also work great for tactical use!

  • bbmg

    I don’t understand why they don’t pop a steel cylinder or ball in the hollow point. It won’t add a dramatic amount of weight, or hinder expansion, and might just make it through if the target is wearing body armor.

    If the target is unprotected, then this steel slug would tear on through the target after the main projectile has expanded and stopped.

    It would also reduce drag and improve feeding if it gives the bullet the profile of a FMJ bullet.

    • Flounder

      Handgun ammo cannot have any steel or tungsten… Actually I forget the exact wording but the ATF will… Do horrible things to you if you have “armor piercing” handgun ammo. And their definition of that is ridiculously broad…

      And by doing what you suggest it would take away the advantage of being a hollowpoint…

      • bbmg

        I see the legality point, but how would it stop being effective as a hollowpoint?

        There are plenty of projectiles out there that fill the hollow with a polymer tip, and it actually aids expansion:

        http://www.barnesbullets.com/images/TEZFBwithBlueSabot.jpg

        As even the dimmest criminal could JB weld or simply hammer a 1/4″ steel ball bearing into the hollow, the legislation would seem a bit hollow.

    • FormerSFMedic

      Why would you want to put a steel ball or anything for that matter in a Barnes X bullet? There wouldn’t be any point.

      • bbmg

        For the reasons outlined above, ignoring the legal aspect:

        - velocity retention: a hollowpoint pistol bullet has a very poor aerodynamic shape. Have you ever seen anything designed to go fast with a cup shaped nose? As the short ranges pistols are normally fired this is less relevant than say for a rifle bullet, but velocity is important. A 185 grain bullet at 1000 fps carries 411 ft lbs of energy, reduce that by just 100 fps and you’re down to 333 ft lbs. Thus, filling the tip to make it more aerodynamic makes sense.

        - more reliable feeding in an auto: a round nose interacting with the feed mechanism is less likely to snag and jam than a squared off tip.

        - better effect on target: If the target is wearing a bullet resistant vest, the hollow point alone is unlikely to penetrate. Adding a steel tip gives it at least some chance of going through. If the target is unprotected, then the hollow point will expand as it would normally, while the tip will proceed to make a deeper would channel, potentially reaching vital organs that the main bullet would have missed.

      • FormerSFMedic

        @Bbmg- Unfortunately your theories are incorrect. It is possible that some of your ideas may be sound when it comes to traditional projectiles but not with the Barnes Triple Shock Bullets.

        Hollow points are actually very aerodynamic. Most competition shooters use HP ammo in matches because it is more accurate. The Barnes bullets are known as some of the most accurate bullets on the market. When a HP flies to the target, the HP fills with air which creates a perfect point at the nose. This increases accuracy and retained velocity. With that said, because pistol bullets move at relatively slow velocities anyway, the weight of the bullet will be the main factor in retained velocity. Also the BC of the pistol bullets are very low already which means there is not much a manufacturer can do to help with retained velocity at longer ranges.

        More reliable feeding is more a product of the gun and the cartridge overall design than bullet profile. A pointed nose would probably help but most modern semiautomatics will feed HP just fine anyway.

        Finally, effect on target is why the Barnes X Bullets are so desirable in the first place. The Barnes X Bullet doesn’t need any help with expansion. In fact, the Barnes X Bullets will expand more reliably than any traditional HP design. A steel ball is not going to help but rather HINDER expansion. Barnes X Bullets are also barrier blind. They will expand after going through denim or sheet metal or auto glass, it really doesn’t matter.

        Barnes X Bullets are NOT like traditional lead core bullets. The X Bullet performs better in almost every area and does not respond to modification like lead bullets. Your assumptions may be true for a traditional bullet (although I don’t think so) but not with the all copper Barnes Bullets.

      • bbmg

        “Hollow points are actually very aerodynamic. Most competition shooters use HP ammo in matches because it is more accurate. The Barnes bullets are known as some of the most accurate bullets on the market.”

        A hollow point can be more accurate, but that is not related to its shape – it is because the centre of gravity moves to the rear, which reduces yaw.

        “When a HP flies to the target, the HP fills with air which creates a perfect point at the nose. This increases accuracy and retained velocity.”

        If that was true you’d better give a quick phone call to Boeing, they got the shape of the Jumbo Jet nose all wrong! If there was even the slightest aerodynamic advantage of a cup shaped front end, we would be seeing it everywhere.

        “With that said, because pistol bullets move at relatively slow velocities anyway, the weight of the bullet will be the main factor in retained velocity.”

        That is true enough at ranges below 100 yards.

        “A pointed nose would probably help but most modern semiautomatics will feed HP just fine anyway.”

        Agreed.

        “Barnes X Bullets are NOT like traditional lead core bullets. The X Bullet performs better in almost every area and does not respond to modification like lead bullets. Your assumptions may be true for a traditional bullet (although I don’t think so) but not with the all copper Barnes Bullets.”

        There are non-lead bullets with polymer tips that expand perfectly well, there is no reason why making that tip out of steel would in any have a negative effect on bullet expansion.

      • http://www.tacticaltshirts.com Tacticaltshirts.com

        The issue being debated is best addressed in it’s entirety as opposed to disjointed selective features: I.E. The Ballistic Coefficient of the entire bullet as opposed to just the front end.

    • Mike Knox

      Steel cores in projectiles just pencils through target material rather than typical trauma. It’s because it’s not as pliable as lead. Lead deforms to transfer energy in terminal ballistics, while steel keeps it’s shape more and keeps traveling along like a sled on packed snow. Most of the time the copper jacket peels or even slides off the harder material when entering the target.

      It’s one reason why the Russians changed from steel cored 7.63x39mm to 5.45x39mm with regular ball rounds..

      • bbmg

        In the scenario I am proposing, you would still have your expanding hollow point performing as normal, that effect would not be compromised. What you have added is a sub projectile filling an otherwise empty void that would enhance the effect on target, along with the other advantages outlined above.

      • Mike Knox

        Doing that would just mess it up. The energy transfer in the expanding jacket would just scab off and the core stopping part way into the target. The terminal energy would be spent more on the disintigrating projectile rather than wounding effect. Additionally, the intent of this round’s design of cutting down recoil wouldn’t take effect.

        The point of using only copper is the lighter projectile and decrease of inertial argument..

      • bbmg

        There are plenty of plastic tipped bullets out there that expand perfectly well: http://www.americanrifleman.org/Webcontent/gallery/115/2041Federal.jpg

        The plastic tip actually enhances expansion, and given the way the hollow point peels off even if a tip wasn’t present, there’s no reason to believe any extra energy would be lost separating the two parts.

        With regards to weight, a 1/4″ steel BB weighs around 15 grains – I’ll wager you need an accelerometer for an arm to notice the difference in recoil between a 185 grain bullet and a 200 grain bullet.

      • Mike Knox

        Stay on topic, it’s about steel inserts in bare copper jackets, not plastic.

        ADD much?

      • bbmg

        I read “I am unable to reason with your argument, so I will accuse you of deviating from the topic at hand and of suffering from a psychiatric condition”.

      • Mike Knox

        As early as it were, You’ve already lost track of the topic as soon as you weren’t able to gett he point after my second response. I’m sure you lost it after reading the phrase ‘inertial argument’.

        Well, being an internet urchin, I’m sure you can just go as far as words on a screen, not the numbers and tactile experience of the artilces involved in topic..

  • gunslinger

    only way to reduce recoil is to..well reduce the energy, right (conservation of energy/momentum)? so a lighter round would require less powder and thus the “bang” would be less.

    • FormerSFMedic

      Lighter bullet = less recoil. Recoil is measured by a ratio between bullet weight, velocity, and weight of the weapon. Lighter bullet = less recoil.

      • Hagge

        Actually a lighter bullet requires more powder to have the same pressure.

    • http://www.tacticaltshirts.com Tacticaltshirts.com

      Don’t forget the powder volume is a factor in this. Ask any Perry shooter running a 308 vs 30-06. The 06 will generally kick harder doing the same thing.

      In the end it’s all about measurable results. While there will be a difference with this load, I think the end user won’t notice it.

  • Mike Knox

    If you’re still wondering about how this reduces recoil: the lighter bullet requires less energy to accelerate than heavier one, making the transition from internal to external balistics shorter. Therefore less inertial recoil added to mechanical recoil and propellant blowback..

  • Lance

    Very nice. I hope Barnes ammo wont be overpriced. I like my Federal HST personally.

  • Lance

    Wonder will barns sell bullets soon to reload??

  • Nicks87

    I just took a white tail buck on opening day of deer season with my AR-15 at about 175 yards with 70gr Barnes Lead Free TSX bullets.

    One shot dropped him and one more finished him off. This ammo is excellent. I will definately be buying the TAC-XP pistol bullets.