Magpul STR Stock Review

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NOTE: This product review was made possible by GunsForSale.com.  To get up-to-date information on where to find cheap Magpul stocks for sale, please visit GunsForSale.com.

Magpul started shipping it’s new STR stock recently. You may have some difficulty finding them in stock. Magpul is producing them as fast as possible but right now demand exceeds supply. The MSRP is in the $100.00 range. The one I received is the Mil-Spec version. http://store.magpul.com/product/MAG470/171

The STR stands for “Storage/Type Restricted”. Well it seems the person I spoke with in customer service was a new guy because he sure gave me some incorrect information. As most of you probably know the CTR has the same type of classification.This is the honest to goodness real reason for the type restricted.

The “Type Restricted” portion of the name does not refer to the ITAR export restrictions on cool stuff. When the CTR and UBR were released/developed, it was noted that some potential customers were restricted from removing the buffer tube from their rifles as needed for UBR installation, but still had use for an enhanced stock. The CTR was designed for this market.

CTR – Compact/ Type Restricted Stock–
Basic stock used for compact applications such as shorty/PDW weapons and rifles for units that restrict removal of the buffer tube.

The STR is a modified version of the CTR with storage capacity which incorporates a better cheek weld. The double tubes are water resistant with a rubber seal at the rear of each. It has a shielded operation lever with a supplemental friction lock. There are two integral sling loops as well as a reversible QD sling mount.

The buttpad is rubber with the thinner pad installed. Thicker pads may be ordered from Magpul. Another design change I noticed was at the bottom rear of the A frame. The flat portions size was increased which provides a bit better rest than the CTR.

Installation is very simple as are most stocks for the AR15. The user simply holds the adjustment lever up which releases the friction lock. Insert the dummy 5.56 round that Magpul includes between the frame and friction lock and pull down. This allows you to slide the stock on the buffer tube. Remove the pressure on the dummy round and you’re done.

As you can see from the pictures the battery compartment is easily accessed by using a coin or that dummy round at the rear of the plug and remove. Replacing it is simply a matter of pressing it into place where it locks in. Capacity is two C123 batteries per side or a few small AR parts.

After installation I took my AR with the STR to the range for some shooting and get a feel for it’s operation as well as the new cheek weld. With some stocks the cheek weld is too wide for me and I find myself leaning into the stock to get a good view of my optic. With an EoTech it’s not a big deal usually but with a 1X4 scope it’s a bit problematic. This was not the case with the STR. The body of the stock wasn’t excessively wide allowing a good weld and an easy view of any optic. The buttpad shape felt natural and fits the shoulder well. The rubber is a bit harder than most so some may decide to replace this pad with the thicker softer variety.

Adjusting the stock was simple and straight forward. When the release is activated the stock slides easily into the desired position. My only preference would be a friction lock closer to the release so I can adjust and lock without having to move my hand in a different position. It’s not bad at all don’t get me wrong but I have gotten used to a stock I can adjust and lock with one easy movement. The only other preference I have is with the friction lock not having an audible click or feel letting you know the lock is fully engaged. Even so it caused no problems and the user would get used to it. A plus is it is ambidextrous for you lefties or those who practice both left and right hand shooting. If you try to rotate the stock side to side with the friction lock on there is some free play. Once I had the rifle up to my shoulder it wasn’t as noticeable and shouldn’t cause any difficulty with precision shots at distance.

Even though there were a few things I would like to see changed these concerns are really minor. This is still a quality stock worthy of consideration as a replacement for your old AR15 stock. The price is very competitive with other stocks having these features. From the pre-sales as well as sales since shipping started it looks like Magpul has another winner on it’s hands.


Phil White

Retired police officer with 30 years of service. Firearms instructor and SRU team member. I still instruct with local agencies. My daily carry pistol is the tried and true 1911. I’m the Associate Editor and moderator at TFB. I really enjoy answering readers questions and comments. We can all learn from each other about our favorite hobby!


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  • noob

    I always wondered what mysterious ITAR controlled technical data was manifest in the STR and CTR stocks (and others) that isn’t already spread all over the world.

    Injection moulding dimensions? You could work that out from the publicity photos.

    • Other Steve

      I’m sorry, are you wondering why a government regulation doesn’t make sense? :)

      • Phil White

        Other,

        Government regulation and say common sense—— hum nope the two words don’t work together do they.

    • Nadnerbus

      I’m sure criminals and terrorists all just throw up their hands and give up when confronted with the vast justice of ITAR. Guess they’ll just have to build bombs.

    • Thomas

      Dammit I´m from Europe and I actually own a CTR stock from Magpul … expecting a black helicopter to start hovering about my house any minute :-D

      • Phil White

        Thomas,

        LOL—- no black helicopters. Check my edit on type restrictions. You are definitely safe.

      • W

        dude, europe doesnt have the money to fly a black helicopter over your house. you are safe :D

        • Phil White

          W,

          LOL–maybe the UK does but not Greece or France! Don’t we have the only license to fly black helicopters:-)

    • Phil White

      noob,

      Yea apparently when I got the stock and asked the person at Magpul, who I have never talked to before, they gave me the export restriction story when it only means not for sale in states that restrict removing stocks for the fold/collapsible variety. I edited the information.
      I hate getting bad info!

  • charles222

    Always wondered what the “Type Restricted” stuff meant. Thanks Steve.

  • whamprod

    So basically, Magpul have finally gotten around to producing a VLTOR EMOD with diminished capacity and no strike plate? ……several years late? I generally like Magpul products and own several, and I’m sure this is a fine stock for the price, but I think that they were a dollar short and a day late on this one.

    • Devon

      I agree. It seems like people with ARs think every time Magpul craps out a new product it is made of gold. They put out quality products but I don’t see a major difference between a lot of their parts and other parts on the market. They don’t tend to show a lot of innovation and its just like whamprod said, its like a vltor ripoff with less capability.

      • Phil White

        Devon,

        This one does have a friction lock which the EMOD lacks so the VLTOR moves around a bit.

    • Nater

      The ACS is the Magpul equivalent to the EMOD. This stock is more like Vltor’s IMOD. They’re all just other manufacturer’s takes on the SOMOD/Crane stock, so you can’t really say Magpul is lifting anything from Vltor.

      • W

        I think so too.

        Though Im sure these companies wanted to introduce a product that costs a fraction and yet is different enough not to violate patents. The SOPMOD Crane stocks were stupid priced anyways.

        I prefer Vltor. Easily the most rugged and heavy duty, though some complain of the bulkiness and weight. Grow stronger.

      • Nater

        It’s been awhile since I read it, but I don’t think the EMOD did any better than either the LMT or B5 Systems SOPMOD stocks in drop tests. I like the A5 EMOD because it works perfectly with Vltor’s A5 RE. I’ve never tried a SOPMOD on an A5 extension, but I need to do so.

        They’re both fairly heavy stocks. If I ever buy another piston AR, I’ll use a EMOD/SOPMOD or a UBR to help balance out the weight on the front of the system.

      • Nater
      • W

        “It’s been awhile since I read it, but I don’t think the EMOD did any better than either the LMT or B5 Systems SOPMOD stocks in drop tests. I like the A5 EMOD because it works perfectly with Vltor’s A5 RE. I’ve never tried a SOPMOD on an A5 extension, but I need to do so.”

        according to the test it didn’t, which wasn’t terrible either, it was a pretty decent test.

        It was pretty comprehensive to avoid black and white conclusions. Weight per strength ratio. pretty innovative.

        “They’re both fairly heavy stocks. If I ever buy another piston AR, I’ll use a EMOD/SOPMOD or a UBR to help balance out the weight on the front of the system.”

        they are indeed heavy and people complain of that. Grow stronger me lad…

        • Phil White

          W,

          There is no doubt that a rifle with a heavy barrel etc. is well served by a heavier stock to balance out the weight. Besides the obvious advantages the enhanced balance makes it much easier to make longer shots standing unsupported.
          It does seem, as some noted, the SOPMOD is a bit on the expensive side.

    • KillerBee

      ACTUALLY, the STR fills a gap.

      Magpul designed it with the Vltor A5 recoil system in mind. The A5 recoil tube is .75″ longer than a carbine receiver extension.

      The EMOD, which I own, has an airspace gap between the tip of an A5 RE and the interior of the stock. The STR, which I also own, allows the stock to collapse with zero gap between the A5 buffer tube and the interior of the stock. This means that the shooter can get nearly a full inch closer to the gun if they shoot with the stock collapsed all the way in (like I do, for use with body armor).

      THIS is a huge improvement and a void that no other stock fills. Makes the whole gun feel lighter.

      • Phil White

        KillerBee,

        I also have both and can certainly vouch for your comparison in fit between the two.

    • Phil White

      whamprod,

      It kinda looks like one as far as the storage/cheek weld are concerned. The EMOD allows you to remove the storage tubes on each side.

  • http://rushtac.blogspot.com/?m=0 Russ

    I like the looks of it, I may be replacing me Vltor with this one. I don’t like the gaps in the Vltor cheek piece

    • Other Steve

      I have an STR on my 12.5″, love it. I took of the ACS and I’ll keep that for my recce. The STR is noticibly smaller but with the same great cheek weld.

      • Phil White

        Other,

        I like the STR as well. I may even keep it on my AR and relegate the other stock for another time and another rifle. I agree the cheek weld is very good indeed. As has been mentioned for those who wear plate body armor the reduction in size/length is good thing.

    • Phil White

      Russ,

      I’m sure you’ll like it. Compared to the VLTOR it is a snug fit when the friction lock is activated. IMHO this does help the shooter squeeze a bit more accuracy from the AR. The more stability the better the results.

      Not that VLTOR doesn’t make a quality product but it is a matter of personal choice and perceived needs.

  • Tom – UK

    Restricted for sale outside of the USA?

    Oh how on earth will war, crime and terrorism get on without this stock?

    In all seriousness what is the point of the bans? Here in the UK I am desperate for some Ruger Mini 14 magazines of standard 20/30/40 round capacity but the US which will happily export the gun won’t export magazines for it and removes the ability to sell to Europe! Madness given there are 800 million of us and however many shooters.

    • Nadnerbus

      Sorry, US law is asinine on this. ITAR does not care about your need for mags, or the stupidity on selling a gun but banning parts for it.

      Can you guys order rebuild kits? Or does the ban go towards even sub parts of the baned items?

      On the bright side, business opportunity. Get your hands on one, reverse engineer, and take it to a sheet metal shop.

      • Tom – UK

        I have no idea about re-build kits all I know is that many millions of European shooters cannot get US.

        I have a few twenties but the problem is that Many US weapon platforms are not popular in Europe, there is a much wider variety of modern semi auto rifles and surplus cold war rifles etc

        The manufacturing of most of the US stuff just wouldn’t be worth it.

      • Phil White

        Nadnerbus,

        Here is the edit on this particular stock: I certainly got some bad information in my call to Magpul! I still believe your comment is valid. The ITAR restrictions can be pretty stupid!

        The “Type Restricted” portion of the name does not refer to the ITAR export restrictions on cool stuff. When the CTR and UBR were released/developed, it was noted that some potential customers were restricted from removing the buffer tube from their rifles as needed for UBR installation, but still had use for an enhanced stock. The CTR was designed for this market.

        Quote (from 1/5/2006):

        CTR – Compact/ Type Restricted Stock–
        Basic stock used for compact applications such as shorty/PDW weapons and rifles for units that restrict removal of the buffer tube.

    • Phil White

      Tom,

      While I’ve edited the incorrect information I received from the company your comment is still valid. There are many restricted items that I could never understand the reason for such a restriction.

    • Phil White

      Tom,

      There was a time when the larger capacity mags were restricted to law enforcement even here in the states. It doesn’t surprise me that Ruger restricts exportation.
      I would think you could buy aftermarket low capacity mags? Is that the case in the UK?

      • Tom – UK

        Its not just ruger it is any form of magazine that holds over 10 rounds!

        there is such a huge market that the US could access and encourage the spread of firearms sales that is restricted for seemingly no reason.

        • Phil White

          Tom,

          The old ten round magazine is a flawed argument anyway. So, carry more magazines. I don’t like the ten round rule in some states since it only effects those who abide by the rules. Criminals never have and never will. Foolish thinking!

  • Ben C

    The “Type Restricted” portion of the name does not refer to the ITAR export restrictions on cool stuff. When the CTR and UBR were released/developed, it was noted that some potential customers were restricted from removing the buffer tube from their rifles as needed for UBR installation, but still had use for an enhanced stock. The CTR was designed for this market.

    Quote (from 1/5/2006):

    CTR – Compact/ Type Restricted Stock–
    Basic stock used for compact applications such as shorty/PDW weapons and rifles for units that restrict removal of the buffer tube.

    by

    Richard Fitzpatrick
    Magpul Industries Corp
    RMF Inc (Class 3 Colorado)

    at

    http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_3_12/188153_.html&page=15

    • Phil White

      Ben,

      Thanks Ben that sure does clarify the bad information I received from what I can only guess was a new employee at Magpul. My usual contact wasn’t available at the time.
      Anyway, I edited the post to reflect the correct information. I appreciate you posting this.

      • Ben C

        Happy to have shared something after reading so much new stuff here. Keep up the good work.

        • Phil White

          Ben,

          I don’t mind being proven wrong at all as long as someone such as yourself chimes in with the correct information.
          Again, I very much appreciate it!
          I’ll stay at it:-)

  • Ramsey

    Is there anyone else who feels absolutely underwhelmed at yet another adjustable stock for the AR platform? It is a piece of plastic you tuck into your shoulder, you might rest your cheek against it, but it is not necessary with zero parallax optics. Yippeeee! Maybe this one should store some batteries! Stop the presses, this is going to change the whole game.

    How many man hours have been spent on imagining, designing, engineering, manufacturing, shipping, advertising, and selling these things? Have we progressed so little in the last 30 years? Jesus, put a compass in the damn thing, then at least you are adding utility. The AR is a mature platform. Carbine, mid, full gas systems? Not really a new thing. Pistons? Tired old tech. Where is the innovation?

    They may be fun to hate on, but at least Kel-Tek is innovating. Give me an SU 16c any day over yet another version of the AR. PMR 30? Hell yeah, I want 2. Could you guys make a bullpup 7.62 that is ambidextrous? Oh didn’t see you there RFB. Magpul can do some amazing things (looking at you, little folding machine gun), but this is pretty vanilla.

    • Rangefinder

      Why innovate when all I have to do is tweak a product and sell it as if I really did something. If that doesn’t work make an FDE version.

    • Joe Schmoe

      Are you talking about the Magpul FMG-9?

      Sorry buddy:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARES_FMG

    • Nater

      Kel-Tec doesn’t really do that much innovation. The PMR-30 is just a cheap, problem riddled version of the FN Five-Seven. I guess it is better to spend less on a pistol that is only really useful for playing around, but then again, I’d still like my micro-caliber pistol to work right. The PMR-30 doesn’t.

      The SU 16 is a solution looking for a problem. Maybe it’s popular in ban states, I don’t know. What I do know is that it is made by Kel Tec, that makes it suspect. The company simply does not produce quality firearms.

      • Rangefinder

        Kel-Tec markets novelties. A robust product (i.e. more expensive) would most likely reduce their market share and put pressure on their margins. My guess is there are more potential buyers for “neat-o” stuff than robust equipment.

      • Phil White

        Nater,

        Agreed Nater I’ve never felt the need to review one especially after the PMR-30 recall. The rifles are also overpriced but that’s just my opinion.

      • RocketScientist

        First off, the PMR-30 is not just a five seven knockoff.. it uses a totally different action, different construction, totally different cartridge. And the action’s operating principle is actually pretty innovative: being able to operate as both direct-blowback and delayed-blowback depending on the pressure of the cartridge. Not saying the system doesnt have problems, the recall proves that. But the idea is really neat. Probably a case of needing mroe refinement/development and being put to market too soon.

        As for the SU-16, you say “The SU 16 is a solution looking for a problem. Maybe it’s popular in ban states, I don’t know. What I do know is that it is made by Kel Tec, that makes it suspect. The company simply does not produce quality firearms.”

        I recently bought an SU-16c. It cost me about $560. It weighs FOUR AND A HALF POUNDS, folds up (with a 30rd AR mag installed) to be small enough to fit in a tennis racket bag (or backpack, etc) and can be fired in this condition, and shoots as accurately at 150 yds as my friend’s AR. The problem(s) it solves? I want a lightweight field/camping/mountain gun that fits in my backpack. I want a cheap gun that i can fold up and put under my truck seat. I want AR accuracy and gas piston reliability for under $600. I want a folding gun that can shoot while folded, but still has a stock u can actually get a cheekweld on when extended (not like a ak style wire folder) and have an integral bipod for longer range prone shooting. Show me any gun that can do all (any?) of those things.

        And before you say “but I’d never trust a kel-tec in battlefield conditions, its not rugged enough like an AR” first off, its not meant to be the same gun the AR is. And I won’t ever be taking my SU into a full-on battlefield situation (and i doubt you will ever do the same with your ‘battle ready’ rugged AR either). BTW, I’ve put about 400 rds through mine of various brands of FMJ ammo (brass, steel, .223, 5.56) and had not one FTF, FTE, etc.

        And condemning all keltec products as novelties and junk… have you ever owned one?

      • Nater

        I don’t like Yugos, I don’t need to own one to know it. Crap is crap. Kel Tec makes crap. Switching between blowback and delayed blowback is a gimmick. It compromises the integrity of either system. Light weight, full-sized pistol firing a very low recoil round. The whole market behind the PMR 30 is to offer a Five Seven-like pistol to people that don’t want to shell out for the real thing. Not a bad idea, too bad Kel Tec is the only one to do it.

        SU 16. Lightweight is great, but not when it compromises the structural integrity of a weapon. Drop that loaded SU 16 from four feet, see what happens.

        Kel Tec makes terrible products. They break like toys, so much so that it shows in Google’s auto complete. Innovation for innovation’s sake is also a fool’s errand in any field, even more so with weapons.

      • RocketScientist

        So your response can be summarized: “I know keltec’s are all crap. I know this for a fact because I’ve never owned one. Also they break all the time, I know this for a fact because it says so on the internet”?
        And mine fell fell from about 6 feet when I was moving things around on the shelf it was stored on. Landed on the rear of the receiver at the most critical point. No damage whatsoever. Still shoots and cycles fine, shoots to same point of aim. Not trying to convince you to like these guns, everyone has different tastes. But saying you don’t like a gun, or don’t personally have a use for one is very different from saying they’re all pieces of junk based on something you read on the internet. Talk to people who actually own keltec products and ask them what they think… the responses might surprise you. I know, it’s crazy to suggest that people who own and use a product might be able to give a more accurate impression of its value. It’s much more logical to listen to people saying they’re absolute crap without ever owning, or even shooting one (which is what turns out to be the case 99% of the time i ask someone expressing these opinions if they’ve ever owned or shot the gun they claim is worthless).

      • RocketScientist

        Also, you go from saying this about keltec:
        “Kel-Tec doesn’t really do that much innovation”

        to this:
        “Innovation for innovation’s sake is also a fool’s errand in any field”

        So the company does no innovation, but the main failure of the PMR-30 is it is too innovative?

      • W

        I think its about trade offs. The SU16 is good for a camp gun, plinking, or home defense. or people on a budget that may not necessarily want a tactical looking gun. Like what rocket scientist said, lightweight, foldable, with gas piston reliability for under 600 bucks that can fit under a truck seat. Not a bad idea at all.

        I wouldnt touch one not because it is a terrible weapon, but because i have the budget to buy, accessorize, and meticulously train with military-style semi-automatics and want a weapon that will hold off Montana’s environment. Thats me. Everybody is different.

        • Phil White

          W,

          You do make some good points there W! I’m the same way I prefer to save up over a longer period for an AR, M1A1 etc.

      • Ben C

        The KelTec PMR-30 is actually an update and re-introduction of the Grendel P30 originally designed by George Kellgren (hey, sounds familiar) in the late 80s and built in limited quantities in the early 90s. Released the same year as the Five Seven I think.

        Everything old is new again.

        Neither are a copy or knockoff of the FN gun.

    • Phil White

      Ramsey,

      It’s all about business and as long as they remain popular and sales stay up we will absolutely see more stocks for the AR. Supply and demand:-)

    • D

      We’ve been stagnant, technologically, for quite a while in terms of guns. We’ve pretty much hit the end of firearms development, so far as big, foreseeable improvements go. The next step up will probably be some kind of aiming assist device that lets you aim without really aiming; but who knows how long that’ll take to come out.

      • RocketScientist

        I think there are still some significant ‘great leaps’ to be made out there in the field of firearms. Some have already seen a lot of development and are near being a practical fieldable technology, some are in the early stages, some just sketches on a drawing board. Things like caseless ammunition, electronic ignition, precision-guided rifle-caliber projectiles, hypergolic liquid propellant stored in-gun (only have to feed the projectile itself, can adjust amt of propellant used on the fly), to some technologies that are still guns but not technically firearms anymore like electromagnetic railguns. I think there is a lot of room for innovation still out there before projectile weapons have reached their limits. Firearms have been around for around 1300 years, and we’ve been steadily improving them that whole time. Hard for me to believe we’ve reached their full potential yet.

      • noob

        Like RocketScientist said things are moving.

        only thing is that they aren’t for sale to us yet.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlM8IHij6Hs

        The LSAT Lightweight Small Arms Technologies reached Technology Readiness Level 7 recently on its caseless and case telescoped squad autos.

        all they have to do now is get a govt client and then they can begin an entire new ammunition product category.

        Reloading will be interesting – you’d have to cast the rounds out of propellant slurry, with the annular primar seated about halfway down the mould and press the bullet into the top.

        Adjust propellant load by changing the ratio of propellant to inert filler.

        I see a lot of burned eyebrows in the future.

        • Phil White

          noob,

          It is an interesting concept. Back when H&K first tried it there just wasn’t much interest. We tend to rely more on tecdh since H&K’s effort so it may actually go somewhere this time.
          Cost is still a concern as is environmental effects on the ammo.

      • W

        I wonder just how mature the G11’s technology really was. I seem to hear two entirely different stories.

        One story where its technology matured and the design was being adopted, though the cold war changed that.

        another where many problems were left unresolved and the technology needed another 10-15 years to mature.

      • Rangefinder

        I like to think of the innovation process as a decision tree. Down at the base is a rock. The current man-portable shoulder-fired non-recoilless systems are somewhere high in the branches.
        Sure, we can refine the current systems, but the branches get smaller and smaller. Significant change requires traveling back down to a new branch. The magnitude of potential change is proportional to the distance traveled. Some times we can jump from one branch to another via cross-pollination with other industries.
        It is easy to look at the tree below and ponder what other branches could provide. Yet, traveling up a new branch is as difficult and time consuming as our travels before.

      • Rangefinder

        Basically it requires allot of USD, based on analysis by someone who went to an ivy league school, reporting to someone who paid more in dues than the ivy leaguer paid in tuition, attempting to convence a self-made and self-important individual to act in the best interest of the people.

        • Phil White

          Rangefinder,

          And that pretty much sums it up!

  • D

    I have to question the utility of having a spare battery in the stock of your rifle. Gotta figure it’d clatter around in there or be distracting. Plus, what’s the use-case for having spare batteries in the gun itself instead of (say) in your field kit or something?

    Other then that – well, it’s a rifle stock. Maybe some people find having a nice stock like this on their AR is worth the hundred dollars; some people won’t. I personally don’t think it’s worth it, because i don’t see the benefit it gives that’s worth that much money.

    • Phil White

      D,

      Again it involves preference and what a person is willing to spend. As far as rattling with batteries inside the VLTOR stocks I’ve owned have a round lightweight rubber plug you cut to length to avoid any movement or noise. It’s a simple fix for other stocks as well. Many items come with Styrofoam packing which you can also cut into a plug for the same use.

      You can also use this space for small AR parts such as a spare firing pin, extractor and other parts. I carry a few batteries in my Magpul grip with the stock holding parts as well as a short cleaning rod with lube.

  • Lance

    I like the stock it offer same features that a SOPMOD stock has at a fraction of the cost. Like the storage compartment for batteries brushes ect.

    I still dont get the fascination with new pistol grips? The A2 style is older than fancy magpul but its just fine and comfortable to me.

    • Phil White

      Lance,

      Of Course that’s fine and it fits your needs. My hands are a bit large and the Magpul grip just fits my hand better. I didn’t buy the kit version though.

    • Reverend Clint

      a2 is too small and the bumps rub my fingers. just because something is original doesn’t mean its the best

      • charles222

        Likewise. I grew up in the military with the SAW; the grip on that is gigantic compared to an M4’s. And I have big hands to begin with, so the M4 factory grip is almost always the first thing to go on my M4 at work. Ergogrip and Magpul are probably my favorites.

      • Phil White

        Reverend,

        It’s also very loose for taste.

  • Mike Knox

    “yay, magpul comes out with another stock, whoopeee”. These days ,that company’s starting to go the same way as MTV..

  • John Doe

    I own and love Magpul as much as the next guy, but a lot out their products are just boring. It’s getting repetitive.

  • jdun1911

    IIRC in drop testing Magpul UBR rank first and the STR second as the most durable.

    • jdun1911

      Ok I’ve found the test.

      http://militarytimes.com/blogs/gearscout/2012/02/01/buttstock-bashfest-gearscout-finds-out-just-how-far-tough-talk-goes/

      The top three are:

      Strength/Weight to failure
      1. Magpul UBR
      2. Magpul STR
      3. B5 Systems SOPMOD

      Strength/Weight to compromise
      1. Magpul UBR
      2. Magpul STR
      3. Colt Super-Stoc

      • Phil White

        jdun1911,

        With the Rogers or Colt if you will coming in third that shows it’s a very durable stock as well. I reviewed it a few months ago before Colt adopted it.

      • W

        you know what is the most durable stock available? the A2 stock. hands down the most durable.

      • jdun1911

        Ok W let me rephrase it for you. The UBR and STR are the most durable AR15 collapsible stock on the market.

      • jdun1911

        Phil White,

        I probably going to buy STR and Colt sooner or later to add to my collection. Right now I’ve been spending all of my gun budget money on NFA items.

        • Phil White

          jdun1911,

          I’d love to have a suppressor and a 10.5 barrel for mine!

      • W

        Those are excellent stocks Jdun, without a doubt. I just prefer Vltor out of personal preference because they fit me. My SBR that I built has a Magpul CTR because it has been abused harshly and is as good as new.

        I was being facetious about the A2 stock, but on a serious note, they are built like a iron bar.

    • Phil White

      jdun1911,

      Very good that does indeed show it’s a product that will hold up under heavy use. Thanks!

  • Ian

    The best part? It’s compatible with the STOK BLOK!

    • Phil White

      Ian,

      It most likely is. It’s also on sale at Brownells for $6.99.

  • ChromeRhino

    Rainier Arms has the STR in Black and FDE.
    http://www.rainierarms.com/?page=shop/detail&product_id=3045

    I’ve found the STR to be an extremely stout, versatile stock. Even if you don’t want to store batteries (or anything else) onboard the buttstock, it still makes for a good, comfortable cheekrest. And its a much shorter length than the ACS. I like it.

  • Broham

    Is the cheek weld on the STR the same as the LTM Sopmod or smaller?