Arsenal Firearms Strike One Pistol

strike_one_pistol-tfb

Russian firm Arsenal Firearms have official specifications of the Strike One pistol have been published. I first wrote about it last month after seeing it in a Russian-language video. The pistol’s main innovation is in-line recoil (the barrel recoils straight back, rather than tilting or twisting). This could allow easier control of the gun during recoil.

The straight back recoil also allows the addition of really long barrel, and crazy accessories to go with it. This very kit is called their Long Range Conversion … it looks like a pistol that wishes it was a rifle!

Thanks to Sebastian for the photo.
Slide removed. Many thanks to noel01 for the photo.
The locking system. Thanks to Sebastian for the photo.

The company says …

The Strike One semiautomatic pistol comes to the world scene in 2012 as a completely new and revolutionary gun. The Strike One semiautomatic pistol comes as the fastest, most controllable, most accurate and hard hitting service pistol available today on the world market. A full 5 inches cold-hammered barrel, along with a 75 Hrc surface Nitrite treatment for barrel, locking block, slide and operating pin industrial production standard, warrant safe and flawless use of the pistol in excess of 50.000 rounds.

The frame of the Strike One was also engineered with exacting and unprecedented standards: the operating frame block, again made of the best 42CrMo4 steel, features long rails for total axial and torque control of all the moving parts, pins and springs. The frame itself, with it’s unique and true 3D hand grip (and not just “millings” on a flat surface) comes today as the only service pistol with a full fledged IPSC standard magazine insert “miniskirt”, allowing Special Operation and SWAT teams to work as if they were using a competition pistol. The trigger system of the Strike One, again like no other before, operates mainly on the horizontal plain, without raisers with variable and long, rubbery trigger pull, but with a crisp and short firing pin release: this is the secret, along with a lighting fast locking mechanism, behind the unbelievable semiautomatic firing speed of our pistol.

Finally, thanks to the in-line barrel operation, the Strike One allows the development of a number of extremely innovative accessories, which base the designing and operative criteria on the “carrying in-line barrel”, such as for instance the LRC (Long Range Conversion).

Specifications
Caliber 9×19 Para, 9×21 IMI, .357 SIG, .40 S&W
Capacity 17+1
Action single action only, short recoil, in line barrel,
Safety Internal
Frame reinforced polymer or Ergal light alloy
Finish Nitrite
Barrel 5″ or 4.3″
Weight 26.5 oz. (24.69 oz. for short barrel model)
Sights fixed or adjustable

[ Many thanks to Eugene, noel01, Sebastian and our Dutch friend for emailing us info and photos. ]

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Steve Johnson

Founder and Dictator-In-Chief of TFB. A passionate gun owner, a shooting enthusiast and totally tacti-uncool. Favorite first date location: any gun range. Steve can be contacted here.


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  • Higgs

    Bi-pod on a pistol…… wow.

    • AK™

      Bi-pod on a pistol….. wow.

      You would think the Desert Eagle would have came with one from the factory considering its weight.

      When all else fails with a Deagle..you can always clobber someone with it.

      • Jeff

        I’ve always wondered why they never had a 16″ barrel and stock “carbine” kit for a desert eagle. With such powerful rounds, not like it’d hurt

    • Matt G.

      That magnifier behind the aimpont made me LoL.

  • hojo

    looks cool. I’ll let some of you guys buy one and get back to me.

  • Joe Doe

    I think it is more accurately described as an Italian firearms company with one of its partners being Russian.

    • http://www.all4shooters.com Pierangelo Tendas

      Exactly. The company is not Russian; it’s headquartered in Gardone Val Trompia and two out of three founders are Italians. Yet, without the contribution of the Russian partner, the thing would not have been feasible.

  • CUrob

    Appearance wise, it looks like a keltec PMR-30 with a Glock slide…wonder how it shoots?

    • http://www.all4shooters.com Pierangelo Tendas

      Astonishingly well!

  • BigBeluga

    The safety listed on the site is a “single arc trigger”. Does anyone know what this means or how it works?

    • http://www.all4shooters.com Pierangelo Tendas

      Pretty much simple, actually.

      Most of trigger-safety pistols have a trigger that’s composed out of two parts. Think of the Caracal, the Glock, the Springfield XD: they have a second trigger component, a “counter-trigger” we might say, that won’t let the trigger itself be pulled all the way down if the correct pressure isn’t exerted on it.

      The “Strike One” has a single-piece trigger, without any external “counter-trigger” or second component, that yet offers the same degree of safety. This because the trigger is directly linked to a rotating “shoulder” (this is how they call the trigger bar in this pistol), that won’t rotate completely upon pressure and thus won’t engage the transfer bar to release the striker upon the chamber unless uniform pressure is exerted on both upper and lower part of the trigger, which can only happen with a correct and deliberate pull and which will on the contrary NOT happen in case of entanglement of a foreign object in the trigger guard, or through the pressure by the small and weak fingers of a child.

  • http://www.all4shooters.com Pierangelo Tendas

    Please enjoy the first full feature article regarding the Arsenal Firearms AF-1 “Strike One” here:

    http://www.all4shooters.com/it/Home/News/2012/March/Arsenal_Firearms_Strike_One_semiautomatic_pistol/

  • http://www.thegunzone.com/556dw.html Daniel E. Watters

    There are some good pictures of the stirrup-shaped locking block at Frank James’ blog.

    http://frankwjames.blogspot.com/2012/03/pistols-both-new-and-knock-offs.html

  • http://www.armoury-online.ru/usr/templates/images/1331453324321.jpg mark

    you need this!

  • strongarm

    Designers of this pistol should sleep over these features;

    - Field Stripping, cumbersome not comparable with Glock,

    - Slide Weakness on both side where Locking Block enters, nearly
    same with ill fated Beretta F92,

    - Little Locking Surfaces, collecting more strength for a possible slide
    crack,

    - One Piece Trigger, hope a user in stress to fınd correct pressure.

    A pistol to compete with Glock must have more than above.

    • http://www.all4shooters.com Pierangelo Tendas

      You don’t know the design.

      “- Field Stripping, cumbersome not comparable with Glock”

      It is not. All you need is to remove the pin and the weapon basically strips by itself.

      “- Slide Weakness on both side where Locking Block enters, nearly
      same with ill fated Beretta F92″

      Nope. Read my article. The slide is HEAVILY METAL-REINFORCED where the locking block enters.

      “- Little Locking Surfaces, collecting more strength for a possible slide
      crack”

      Little locking surface because it doesn’t needs more. The entire energy that dissipates over the moving parts amount to a weight of mere 25 GRAMS per shot.

      “- One Piece Trigger, hope a user in stress to fınd correct pressure.”

      Very intuitive.

      “A pistol to compete with Glock must have more than above.”

      Once again, you don’t know the design.

      The pictures taken at IWA might be misleading of many comments. Mind, the samples shown at IWA were NON-WORKING PROTOTYPES WITH NON-OPERATIONAL FRAMES AND SLIDES, assembled only to display the concept of the weapon at the show. They didn’t mind bringing the real guns at the show. A live-fire demonstration for a restricted number of selected press members will be held in May or June; the mass production will start in June, the mass distribution will start in September.

      • strongarm

        The design is obvious. Photos have enough clues for one who thinks.
        Please fınd my former two comments before a few weeks ago. They
        should be the closest approach for inner details with photos showing
        only the outside appearance.

        Field stripping is cumbersome because it needs a tool apart from sole
        hand of user, besides, the tiny pin is subject to be lost, further, it needs
        to push in that pin resulting the assamble. Please compare all with only
        taking down a captive lever.

        What about the joining sections so said “Heavily metal reinforced”
        weaker sides with ordinary slide material. Are there also metal reinforced.

        What guaranties the synchorinised motion on both side unlocking motion,
        very little lack of tolerance at kidney shaped cam doubles or tribles the
        force directed to lock bearing surfaces.

        You may be correct for trigger construction, it needs to touch and feel.

        I am also an admirer of Beretta F 92, but when I think of it first, it minds
        Slide Breakage second.

      • http://www.all4shooters.com Pierangelo Tendas

        Actually the removal of the pin requires no tool but either a bullet tip or your finger… I’ve seen this weapon being field-stripped in six seconds at the IWA. The “little pin” is actually not that “little” and unless you use a tool, it will reach the end of the travel long enough to allow field-strip but will be retained at its end and not fall down from the frame.

        For anything else, I suggest you read my article about it: http://www.all4shooters.com/it/Home/News/2012/March/Arsenal_Firearms_Strike_One_semiautomatic_pistol/

        The entire frame is 42CrMo4 steel-reinforced. Other details regarding the working system, such some you asked (What guaranties the synchorinised motion on both side unlocking motion, very little lack of tolerance at kidney shaped cam doubles or tribles the force directed to lock bearing surfaces.) are still kept reserved as mass distribution hasn’t started yet (after the EXA expo in Brescia next month, and after the reserved-to-press shooting demonstration in early Summer, we should be able to say more).

        As for the legendary Beretta 92F slide breakages… hope you realize that the ones happened during the tests were inducted (they deliberately test-fired the weapon with a submachinegun-grade cartridge and a bullet stuck in the barrel). And that the slide breakages in the early operational samples in the U.S. were also due to the abuse of submachinegun-grade (hotter) ammunition while the Company had precisely discouraged them to do so.

        But weren’t we talking about the “Strike One” here?

        No, seriously, believe me. I understand your comments, but they are all due to what you see now, which is just the surface of the iceberg. Those are really great guns, otherwise I wouldn’t have written so good about them (you can see they don’t advertise on the webzine I work with). Whatever you might want or think of this weapon (compact variant? Higher caliber?) is ready and will be released at the due moment. Under a professional point of view, I seriously think we have a winner here.

    • http://www.all4shooters.com Pierangelo Tendas

      And on a second note, I wouldn’t refer to the Beretta 92F as “ill-fated”. It is in Service with a different name (M92-FS, only an additional safety added) in Italy, the US, France, Spain, and some more dozen Countries…

      • http://www.frankwjames.blogspot.com Frank W. James

        Pierangelo, I have to tell you straight up I’M NO FAN OF THE BERETTA MODEL 92. I’ve had sufficient experience with it in a law enforcement application on a local sheriff’s department and its ‘dry’ locking block to truly HATE the damn thing.

        Fair warning…

        All The Best,
        Frank W. James

      • W

        no, the M9 isn’t ill-fated. it is a fine handgun that was marred by government frugal pennypinchers. For example, the slide, then the magazines. Perfect examples of corner cutting that marred the reputation of a otherwise excellent design.

        It is my personal opinion the US military should have adopted the Glock or SIG P226, though the Beretta is a fine handgun. I carried it with confidence during deployment.

      • Matt G.

        The beretta is plagued by it’s locking blocks shortcomings as well. They fail and regularly.

      • Lance

        The M-9/M-92FS is not ill fated at all and a newer M-9A1 is till be bought by Marines today. Personally it better than the SiG-226 and can only be rivaled by the Glock and legendary 1911A1 in accuracy and performance. Most problem years ago was due to poor ags made by checkmate and the Army not teaching men to lube there pistols after cleaning. Nothing to do with the design.

      • Matt G.

        The early cheap ass mags were a problem. But the main drawbacks to the m9 are design related and un-changeable; the weak locking block, the grip too wide for some warriors, the limited amount of purchase to rack the slide, and most importantly the terrible safety placement.

        If I were eligible to join the military I would try to replace the issued m9 as soon as possible with something more reliable and better designed. I have had a Beretta type gun and I got rid of it quickly, they just aren’t a great design.

      • Lance

        Most of the locking lugs problems where fixed in the 80s by the update from F to FS model. Fact is the M-9 handles suppressor far better than Glock can and is more accurate than the SiG.

        Were getting off topic have to go back to this new Russian 9mm pistol.

      • W

        I personally think it sucks that the M9 was adopted rather than other designs that were available at the time. The P226 is a excellent handgun but so is Glock. I find it interesting that certain “special” units in USSOCOM are using Glock 22′s, being able to select any combat handgun they want with the budget they have.

  • Doesitmatter?

    Sorry I don’t get it. You are saying it has rotary-locked barrel, yet the open action picture shows clearly a vertical cam. So, what’s the scoop? Am I looking at wrong parts or am under wrong impression? In any case, the pistol is vertically extremely slim and beats claims of previous designs in grip vs. barrel location.

    • http://www.all4shooters.com Pierangelo Tendas

      No rotary-locked barrel…

      • Doesitmatter?

        Pierangelo,

        would you pls clarify: is it OR is it NOT a rotary barrel system lockup? So, in that case, what rotates (if anything) – separate lock piece? Thanks.

      • Doesitmatter?

        Oh yes, I found the picture in one referenced page. I can see it now – it is a U shaped block which slides up and down. Very clever, one would say ‘basic’. I was of conviction this has to do with Gsh-18, which it apparently does not.

      • http://www.all4shooters.com Pierangelo Tendas

        And not just that: basically the notch moves rearwards and forwards and doesn’t even reaches the end of its potential travel. This allows a mere force of 24 GRAMS to be exercised on that fundamental part, and extends its potential service life to over 50k rounds.

    • Bmac

      The Glock 17 did not fail the SOCOM trials for replacing the 1911. Glock simply did not have enough pistols completed to supply the US with the required minimum to test. It would’ve put the factory at full capacity leaving too high of a margin for error that may resulted in them delivering an inferior pistol which Glock refused to do. Had they been in the trials, I see no reason our troops wouldn’t be issued them today.

    • Bmac

      Glock did not fail the SOCOM trials, it wasn’t entered. Many in SOCOM wanted the 17 to test very much so. However, Glock could not manufacture enough handguns required to enter the trial. That’s the one & only reason our troops aren’t issued G17s. Personally I would want a 1911 but I understand why Glock would be the best war time sidearm.

  • West

    No rail mounted shotgun??

  • http://www.all4shooters.com Pierangelo Tendas

    ATTENTION: the pictures taken at IWA might be misleading of many comments. In fact the samples shown at IWA were NON-WORKING PROTOTYPES WITH NON-OPERATIONAL FRAMES AND SLIDES, assembled only to display the concept of the weapon at the show. The frames of the guns shown at the IWA weren’t even polymer, but the early ALUMINIUM MACHINED prototypes. They didn’t mind bringing the real guns at the show, because there was no NEED for.
    The weapon itself is much better than what may appear in these pictures and in the comments of some misinformed readers down here, and I would ask everybody to refrain criticizing. In fact, the weapon has already been tested by several governments in total secrecy at the Gardone Val Trompia plant, and over 60k samples have already ordered by a very important national security agency of a Country that asked non-disclosure by now.
    A live-fire demonstration for a restricted number of selected press members will be held in May or June; the mass production will start in June, the mass distribution will start in September.

    • hojo

      I think it looks good and I’m interesting in the concept.

      Your defensive posture and inaccurate assumptions about the US market are what is putting ME off right now.

      Turn it down a notch, and maybe stop attacking potential customers.

      We all have the right to express our dumbass opinions.

      • http://www.all4shooters.com Pierangelo Tendas

        Not actually my fault if the company decided to go for markets other than the U.S. first. Besides, many companies are doing the same; partially is a response of the fact that it’s now so difficult in Europe to acquire American manufactured firearms (the Bush administration imposed the DSP-83 End-User Certificate on many things) and now the internal market has become more demanding. But there are dynamics behind the creation and the concept of this weapon that are away of your, and partially my, understanding. What I know, I can’t tell immediately, because many of those things are still embargoed. Maybe after the EXA expo in Brescia next month, we will be able to say more.

  • MarkM

    The first rule of making a successful handgun is Make It Look Good. They nailed it here, obviously the Italian connection has earned their pay, just the same as Timex having the Italians design the TX IQ watches.

    Nobody buys an ugly gun, it’s man jewelry on your hip.

    Second Rule is It Has To Go Bang Every Time. Remains to be seen.

    Third is Create A Lot Of Word Of Mouth. Well, a bipod does that, but beyond that, how many of you looked at it and said, “Wonder what a 3 1/2″ barrel CCW would look like?”

    Hey, I saw you sticking your fingers over the screen.

    Fourth rule is Can I Afford It? Well, the LCP didn’t kill Rohrbaugh sales, did it? Let’s see who they market it to.

    BTW, if you hunt hogs in Texas, that bipod is more useful than a VFG on a semi auto AR15. It’s just a CQB fad.

    • http://www.all4shooters.com Pierangelo Tendas

      Once again, another non-insider comment; I am not quarreling, simply pointing out that somebody who hasn’t got months of connections with the Company can’t be aware of the amount of work that’s behind it.

      «The first rule of making a successful handgun is Make It Look Good. They nailed it here, obviously the Italian connection has earned their pay, just the same as Timex having the Italians design the TX IQ watches.
      Nobody buys an ugly gun, it’s man jewelry on your hip.»

      The gun is not meant to be nice. It is meant to be functional. It is a weapon that is meant for service and defense; sports shooting and civilian ownership comes second in terms of priority for the company.

      “Second Rule is It Has To Go Bang Every Time. Remains to be seen.”

      It DOES. Over 50000 rounds have been shot overall with the system!

      «Third is Create A Lot Of Word Of Mouth. Well, a bipod does that, but beyond that, how many of you looked at it and said, “Wonder what a 3 1/2″ barrel CCW would look like?»

      The weapon WILL arrive in a compact size, later during the year; read the article I’ve posted below. As for the “Word of mouth”, you’re not here in Italy, so you can’t know that it’s the biggest thing around. The “Strike One” will arrive here first (along with the professional operators that already placed orders). The American market comes second: it is considered basically too glutted, and also too radically conservative… simply put, gunmakers over here in Europe consider American gun owners too stubbornly attached to the 1911 design to appreciate real novelties. That’s why the Caracal arrived so late in the US, some three years after the first commercial launch on a civilian market (once again, the Italian one).

      « Hey, I saw you sticking your fingers over the screen.»

      Sorry, don’t get it. I’m trying to be serious here.

      « Fourth rule is Can I Afford It? Well, the LCP didn’t kill Rohrbaugh sales, did it? Let’s see who they market it to.»

      MSRP has been already announced, since mass distribution is planned for SEPTEMBER 2012: something under 600€ (780US$), to compete with Caracal, Glock and Springfield XD.

      « BTW, if you hunt hogs in Texas, that bipod is more useful than a VFG on a semi auto AR15. It’s just a CQB fad.»

      It is meant for the Silhouette shooting competitions.

      There is a reason why I am here. I have written the first officially-cleared, exclusive article about this gun. I will welcome your questions and save you a poor showing. So, any question before other comments?

      • mosinman

        i agree that we cant critizse this pistol yet, because it hasnt arrived to the US. im also not willing to take the company’s word for it either , because no one is gunna try and sell thier pistol by showing flaws. one thing i do not agree with is how you mentioned that the american public is too stubborn and attached to the 1911. i do beieve the european gun manufacturers are out of touch in that area. sure theres alot of 1911 clones that are sold, but there are also alot of glocks , XDs berrettas and all sorts of “modern” pistols that are bought here.

      • El Duderino

        Appreciate you clearing this up.

        Note to European gun makers: Our market is glutted b/c we’re the only nation in the world with 300 million people that can easily purchase nearly any handgun on the market. We’re the Big Kahuna. Not sure where the belief stems from that we don’t like modern designs. Sure we buy plenty 1911s and Colt SAA clones but we buy plenty of the high-speed Central European and domestic new designs too.

      • http://www.frankwjames.blogspot.com Frank W. James

        Pierangelo: It was good to make your acquaintance at the VISIER party in Nuremberg and I look forward to future discussions. With regard to American ‘Conservativism’ on handgun selections and preferences, I would suggest it has more to do with service pistol caliber selection than it does basic design.

        And that is a MAJOR basic difference between the European Handgun consumer/manufacturer/marketer and their American counterpart.

        One of the reasons the 1911 style pistol is so popular over here is (1) it is a good solid design, that (2) has stood the test of time and the heat of battle, (4) relatively easy to ‘master’ and (4) it is adaptable and often available in a wide range of calibers; some of which are even reasonably ‘powerful’ like the 10mm Auto.

        There is certainly a notable share of the American Market that rejects the 1911 format as ‘dated’, but they don’t totally subscribe to the almost universal European caliber selection of 9x19mm. Unlike other countries shooters over here often use their handguns in recreational pursuits that involve live targets of the quadraped variety. Experience has dictated no matter how great the bullet is designed or built in 9x19mm it remains a ‘weak’ sister to a number of better alternatives.

        What I saw during my tour of the recent IWA show was by and large a wide range of 9x19mm pistols, with the brochures listing the ‘option’ of other calibers like .40 S&W and possibly .357 Sig. But I saw no mention of 10mm Auto or even .38 Super, which in its +P+ form is a serious cartridge when used ‘afield’.

        European manufacturers tend to view their market as an exclusive 9x19mm handgun market and then think of these other calibers as an after-thought in order to ‘entice’ the Americans into purchasing their products.

        Part of Glock’s great success in this country is they recognized this cultural fact early on and accepted it…

        All The Best,
        Frank W. James

      • http://www.all4shooters.com Pierangelo Tendas

        Nice to see you again, Mr. James.

        Yes, I’ve posed the same question actually. As it turns out, .40 and .357 are not “optional” calibers, the weapon is ready for manufacture in those calibers. When asked why no .45, I was responded that “The .45 caliber is limited to the American market”, and there is no sign that the Company is interested in the US market by now. Mind that we are talking about a SINGLE ACTION ONLY PISTOL with no external safety; AFAIK, that would require a redesign for US import.

        But, mind, there are dynamics behind the creation and the concept of this weapon that are away of your, and partially my, understanding. What I know, I can’t tell immediately, because many of those things are still embargoed. Maybe after the EXA expo in Brescia next month, we will be able to say more.

    • mosinman

      oh i forgot sigs and s&w as well.

  • Frank

    That big attachment is used for shooting down police helicopters. I don’t need that….yet.

    • Komrad

      Nice Simpsons reference.

  • e-mishka

    I think that $780 price point is way too high for new pistol that is trying to compete with glocks, springfield xdm and s&w m&p.

    If it was around $550ish, then I would probably get one.

    Whats the weight of it and factory trigger pull?
    How is accessories market for this gun, especially sights and holsters?

    • http://www.all4shooters.com Pierangelo Tendas

      For the European market, which will be the first one to have it, the 600€ price is more of a psychological landmark… the price on the American market (if and when will arrive… mind that we are talking about a SAO pistol with no external safety, so it might need design refinements before being cleared for import under the provisions of the 1968 GCA and as far as BATFE is concerned) will depend on future factors.

  • hikerguy

    It is an interesting and attractive pistol. It’s ergonomic features are quite good. I’d like to see ambi controls myself since I’m a southpaw, and a double action option. Will it complete in a very crowded market here in the U.S.? Well, it remains to be seen. I’d like to see a holster for that long range version! LOL

  • Other Steve

    I didn’t know Keltec was making a 9mm fullsize now? Uh, cool? It’s about as ugly as a fullsize Keltec would be.

    Long Range Conversion huh? Just how much more velocity do they think they are going to get from 9mm past a 5″ barrel? The problem with pistol accuracy is holding it on target. Add a stock, not a bipod…

    You know what? Nevermind. They mention IPSC and SWAT in the same sentence, that’s enough for me to keep walking.

    That tactikewl monstrosity did make me laugh though. So thanks for that.

    • 276 pedersen

      A very thin line between hardcore and stupid.

  • Ted

    Forgive me if I’m wrong, but I always thought that the primary cause of barrel rise was the rotational moment created by the recoil force of the gun being off-axis with the reaction force from your hand. A barrel that recoils straight backwards doesn’t really do anything to alleviate this, does it?

  • Mike Knox

    I was about to say “glock rip-off” until I say the crazy attachments..

  • http://www.all4shooters.com Pierangelo Tendas

    I understand your comments, but they are all due to what you see now, which is just the surface of the iceberg. Those are really great guns, otherwise I wouldn’t have written so good about them (you can see they don’t advertise on the webzine I work with). Whatever you might want or think of this weapon (compact variant? Higher caliber?) is ready and will be released at the due moment. Under a professional point of view, I seriously think we have a winner here.

  • Lance

    Looks like the Russian married a FNP and a Glock into one. Not a bad idea after the MP-443 Grach failed in military and Police circles (Glocks and Berettas soon seen in use in Russian Police use) Another design for Spetz Naz use as a larger partner to supplement the Makarov would be needed. Good idea.

    • W

      Yes! I think this handgun is a essential step for the Russian military to preserve its arms industry. OMFG! actually innovating instead relying on gvt contracts and nationalized industry, funny how that works!

      I think this is arsenal’s way of saying “Hey! stop buying foreign guns, well make a equivalent!”

      • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

        That would make a point, if the “Strike One” was actually a Russian pistol and not an ITALIAN pistol.

  • Matt G.

    Sorry but I hate how people keep saying it’s “strait back barrel movement” reduces recoil because it doesn’t have a barrel moving down or rotating. This is plain retarded.

    If anything, the browning tilting Barrel system REDUCES recoil. Think about it, you fire, you have a slide moving backward and a frame rolling upward, but the rear of the barrel is moving downward, so when the barrel comes down on to the frame, which is moving upward, and they meet, the barrel movement cancels out some of the frame movement, not a lot, but there you are.

    The same thing happens in reverse when the slide returns, you have aa frame rolling back down on target, and a slide moving forward, and a barrel that moves upward at the end, when the barrel and slide meet, the barrels upward movement cancels of some of the slide downward movement(cause the slide is rotating down with the frame), and this reduces a very small amount of muzzle overtravel below the target plane. These have almost now effect on shooting, but they are there. The idea that a nontilting barrel somehow produces less backward and rotational forces is silly.

    The way this design IMPROVES the feel of recoil(not reduces it) is because the fact that the barrel doesnt need to tilt down, means that you can design the slide and barrel to be deeper in the frame, which puts the bore much closer to the center line of the wrist.

    A small distinction I’ll admit, but for people who understand how physics works it kinda matters.

    • Brandon

      Are you retarded? Do you not understand the dynamics of proper pistol shooting? The idea is to keep firearm on target at all times, with most modern handguns the recoil is pushing up instead of straight back, increasing muzzle rise. With a straight back recoil it you will not have to fight muzzle rise nearly as much, and you can therefore keep your pistol on target through more follow up shots.

      • Matt G.

        No Brandon I’m not, but apparently your reading comprehension needs work since you just repeated what I said in the last paragraph.

        All guns recoil straight back from the barrel Brandon, this one just has a lower barrel to wrist pivot offset, which is what makes it “feel” like less recoil. It does not have some magical system that “lowers recoil” like everyone keeps spewing.

        I don’t know who told you that guns recoil “up”, but that person is crazy. Guns recoil behind the barrel, your wrist turns it into a rotation upwards.

    • W

      matt, excellent post. Recoil cannot be magically eliminated, per se, though the distribution of recoil to different points can lead perceived recoil “reduction”.

      For example, the Kriss SMG does not eliminate recoil, it distributes it differently than a traditional SMG.

      Recoil distribution is one of the reasons why AR15s are popular and generally more controllable than contemporary gas piston rifles.

      “The way this design IMPROVES the feel of recoil(not reduces it) is because the fact that the barrel doesnt need to tilt down, means that you can design the slide and barrel to be deeper in the frame, which puts the bore much closer to the center line of the wrist.”

      A+ couldnt of said it better myself…

      • Matt G.

        Exactly. I like how low the barrel is on this gun and would like to try it out if it’s cheap enough. I was just trying to correct the inaccuracies people were spreading.

    • Mike Knox

      Barrel dislocation is actually too little of an action to affect recoil. Slide operated auto-loading pistols are just delaying the recoil until it’s fully racked but almost negates it when it resets. The most prominent effect of recoil is the energy transferred into the shooter..

      • Matt G.

        I know mike I was just using the fact that it has even a minimal impact to show that the locking system was not reducing the recoil.

  • MRN

    Will this gun safely fire 7N21 and 7N31 overpressure ammo like the Grach?

    • W

      it would make sense for it to, since those cartridges are pretty much standard issue for the Russian military.

      • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

        We have been told that it will, but once again, the AF-1 “Strike One” is NOT a Russian pistol; it is ITALIAN.

  • John Doe

    I want an M203 on the one with the Aimpoint.

    • Alex

      There are easier ways to permanently damage your wrists, you know.

  • ruben

    did anyone notice the final pic of the firearm says made in italy on the grip?

    • hikerguy

      Trade laws, at least at one time dictated that the final point of assembly could be designated as the country of origin and manufacture. Many of the Walther PPs and PPKs were actually made by Manhurin in France and blued and assembled in Germany and marked as such. Same probably applies here.

      • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

        Nothing to do with trade laws; simply, the gun early on advertised as Russian… is NOT RUSSIAN; it was simply first seen in Russia because one of the three founders, Mr. Dimitriy Streshinskiy, had it tested in Izhevsk first and arranged a line of ASSEMBLY (not manufacture, just ASSEMBLY) in Russia should it be selected for adoption by the local authorities. The gun is and will 100% be made in Italy; no manufacture in Russia. ARSENAL FIREARMS S.r.l. has its manufacturing establishments in Gardone Val Trompia.

    • W

      Well, thats a good thing. Italy has benelli, franchi, and beretta, both outstanding companies that produce excellent products.

      If I am not mistaken, didn’t Beretta get started producting the arquebus? I think i read it in one of my handgun books…

  • Soless

    In the video at the 1:00 minute mark. There is a close up of the front of the slide. If this was a prototype version, I hope the WAY OFF CENTER front sight doesn’t go into production.

    • JMD

      It looks that way because the pistol is being held at an angle to the camera, and the front sight is set back from the muzzle end of the slide. The front sight is in the center.

      • Soless

        My friend, let’s be honest. You are looking at 1:00 to 1:02 minute mark right? You can clearly see the front sight is not centered. You can even see the dovetailed base is not centered. There is no mistaking it.

      • David/Sharpie

        He’s right, it’s way off to the left (We see it as the right)

    • JMD

      It’s an optical illusion due to the angle. I’m sure of it. What reason would they possibly have to mount the sight all the way to the edge of the slide?

    • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

      The sight has been located off-center on purpose, to show that it is totally adjustable for windage; it’s surprising that you haven’t thought of it before posting. However, windage regulation of the front (as well as of the rear) sights of the “Strike One” will be one of the very few operations in this gun that will require the use of a tool, so to ensure that them won’t go offset or fall out of their seat unless required to.

      • Soless

        Pierangelo, the specs listed before the embedded youtube video state, “Sights fixed or adjustable”. I would think that’s all one would need to see to understand that the sights or sight is adjustable. I’m no stranger to firearms. In fact my immediate thought was that the sight came loose and shifted while firing. It may be something you want to look into further. That is quite an adjustment.

        I have to admit that I’m skeptical when you when you say that it was shown that way on purpose. JMD blatantly lied to himself, me and everyone else who read my initial comment and then his response where he said that the front sight was in fact centered and looked off center due to the camera angle.

  • Ben

    No one has mentioned this yet but the biggest advantage to a barrel that doesn’t need to unlock and tilt during recoil is you can attach a suppressor/silencer *without* a recoil assistance device or neilson device (the little spring and piston assembly on the back of most quality pistol suppressors).

    Being able to suppress it without the neilson device will shave 1.5-2″ off the OAL of a suppressor (for example you could use a trident9 with the standard thread adapter instead of the neilson device adapter, shaving nearly 2″ off the suppressor).

    Does anyone involved with this pistol know if it will function with the added weight of a suppressor and still unlock and cycle without the need of a neilson device?

    • Matt G.

      Ben, i think that while the barrel doesn’t lock “up” like a browning system, it still is a short recoil design and has to have sufficient recoil force moving rearward to operate the system so I don’t think it will run any better than a standard gun without Neilson device. Its not like a blowback design were the barrel doesn’t move, the barrel just doesn’t move DOWN.

      Thinking about it, the beretta m9 barrel doesn’t tilt either, pretty much the same kinda concept here. Does the beretta require a Neilson device?

      • Ben

        It depends. The 92 is considered more reliable without a neilson device then most other guns (like a 1911 or glock) and AAC used to make a neat QD can for them that didn’t have a recoil system in it.

        Really the main thing is if the design can still unlock reliably with a moderately heavy lever on the end of the barrel. If it truely doesn’t tilt up I’m thinking it should be pretty tolerant to things hanging off the barrel.

      • Matt G.

        I would be very interested to see some testing with suppressors. It would definitely make for a very compact and light suppressed pistol setup if it does work.

  • Slava

    What does it mean SINGLE ACTION ONLY PISTOL? The principle of work as the Glock? Or combat spring all the time as much as possible compressed?
    No need to be all the time well lubricated locking element for trouble-free operation?

    Press conference: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yXngE4G7zc&feature=channel

    • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

      No: principle of work as the COLT 1911-A1, with a pre-loaded striker.

    • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

      @Slava, yes, the description is incorrect. I am a personal acquaintance of the designer of the gun, Mr. Bandini; I was also one of the very few journalists cleared to attend the exclusive press conference for the introduction of the gun at the latest IWA expo. The AF-1 “Strike One” is SAO.

  • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

    Another video of the Arsenal Firearms AF-1 “Strike One” pistol:

    • Slava

      Who can be called a designer of the gun? In particular the author of way of locking.

      • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

        The designer and inventor of the AF-1 “Strike One” is Mr. Nicola Bandini. There’s a common misconception about the “Strike One” being a Russian pistol. It is not; the company is 100% Italian and the weapon has been conceived ad will be manufactured in Italy. Only one of the three founders, Mr. Dimitriy Streshinskiy, is Russian.

  • David/Sharpie

    Looks kinda like a cross between a Glock and an SR9.

    I wonder if these will be at the gun show at the end of April, I handled a (I think) MP-446 at the gun show, felt good in my hand, but the guy was pushy trying to get my GF to see how it felt.

  • Mr. Wonderful

    “””””!!!!!VIRUS!!!!!””””” THE VIDEO OF PRESS CONFERENCE HAS VIRUS AS IDENTIFIED BY AVAST, INFECTED MY COMPUTER. DO NOT CLICK ON THIS VIDEO=(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yXngE4G7zc&feature=channel)

    • Bryan S.

      Avast has been garbage for a few years now. Get yourself a free copy of Microsoft Security Essentials, or purchase a copy of Vipre Enterprises AV.. both are top notch.

      I would venture that you have another virus or malware somewhere, not from youtube.

      • Mr. Wonderful

        Avast is highly rated as one of the best free anti-virus by CNET. It identified the virus that started running as soon as I played the video. It disguised itself as being a hard drive problem and starting running scan disk as if it was windows. I had to shut down windows and am currently running a boot-time scan just for starters. Microsoft essentials?? You got to be kidding. But hey, go ahead, click the link. No skin off my back. I type this now from a laptop running linux. (safe from viruses and malware) The Vipre system sounds good. I may try it.

    • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

      Yeah. OF COURSE a virus on a video HOSTED ON YOUTUBE. What about changing your antivirus software? Or stop trying to draw attention on yourself? So to speak.

  • charles222

    The “LR” version reminds me of the DC-17 blaster from Star Wars: Republic Commando:

    http://rpggamer.org/shippics/dc17m.jpg

  • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

    ATTENTION ONCE AGAIN.

    The reader that goes under the name of “Mr. Wonderful” has pointed out that there would be a virus “embedded” somehow in the press conference video-log hosted here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yXngE4G7zc&feature=channel

    Apart from the unlikeliness of a virus being embedded in a video that is HOSTED ON YOUTUBE, since the website runs its own virus scans, the video itself has been reviewed and checked several times by myself and by my company (all4shooters.com) no trace of virus has shown up yet. I can thus only call a false alarm on this; and absolutely nothing at this moment leads us to think that an attack to our video hosting channel might be ongoing.

    • Matt G.

      It sounds like some pathetic attemp at spam.

      “avast helped stop a virus on a video you probably just watched! You should download avast now before it’s too late!!!”

      That kind of thing.

  • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

    Further informations about the AF-1 “Strike One” and other designs of the ARSENAL FIREARMS S.r.l. company can be traced in the company website:

    http://www.arsenalfirearms.com/

    • charles222

      Just a question-could this ever be seen in 5.7x28mm? The LR version seems like it’d be a very good semiautomatic PDW.

      • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

        As for now no plans have been talked about regarding versions in calibers other than 9mm, .40 and .357, at least for the near future.

      • charles222

        Okay, thanks. Just seems a bit of a waste with all that barrel & rails matched up to non-armor-penetrating pistol rounds.

      • Matt G.

        PDW are you joking? That thing looks to be about 4 inches longer than an HK mp-7 which does exactly what you are talking about.

  • charles222

    Matt: The LRC is 375mm long. The MP7 is 340mm long with the stock collapsed, and 500mm with it extended. You’re seriously quibbling over an inch of length, which goes away when the MP7 has the stock out, which you need to utilize the full automatic option?

  • Máté

    DID THEY REALLY SHOOT A TARGET RIGHT NEXT TO THAT GUY’S HEAD?!

    • David/Sharpie

      SF do that in training too

  • Chase

    I would like for these to show up in the US but I think I might just be getting my hopes up. Id love to own one of the Gsh-18 or one of these.

  • Dmitry Kaminsky

    Hey, folks. Russian handguns are banned from importation into USA, since technically this pistol is Italian, will we see it here?

    • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

      First of all, let me clarify: this is not a Russian pistol that is made in Italy to circumvent the import restrictions in some Countries, this is an ITALIAN pistol which will be ASSEMBLED IN RUSSIA FOR THE LOCAL MARKET should there be a request for it.

      As far as a distribution in the U.S. is concerned, yes, there are plans for it, although it might take the time needed to adjust the designs to the will of the BATFE, which would not grant import to a single-action only pistol without an external manual safety.

  • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

    The first concerns the manufacture of the gun, its conception, and its import/export capabilities. The ARSENAL GROUP OF COMPANIES has its seat in Gardone Val Trompia, and the Arsenal Firearms AF-1 “Strike One” pistol will produced entirely in Gardone Val Trompia, province of Brescia, Italy. Any speculation regarding possible production or assembly in any other place has to be dismissed as pure speculation until otherwise confirmed. Anything you need to know about the company itself and where it operates from can be found in the official press conference footage here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yXngE4G7zc

    Second, as far as it concerns the Russian footage showing the offset front sight. The sight has been located that far on the side for the footage on purpose, to show that the front sight in the “Strike One” is TOTALLY ADJUSTABLE FOR WINDAGE. It will be one of the very few operations in this gun that will require the use of a tool, so that the front sight remains in position when the gun is carried and used and the position given by factory or selected by the user according to his/her needs remains fixed until he/she decides to change it again, without any risks of the part coming our or moving away from its setting.

    • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

      I have been hereby asked to rectify about the possible manufacture and/or assembly of models in Russia.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yXngE4G7zc

      The press conference footage at min.18:15 states clearly that facilities of Arsenal Firearms S.r.l. are in Italy. No other provenience of Arsenal pistols should be speculated.

  • Dmitry Kaminsky

    Okay, I would like to let you know that I WILL BE PURCHASING this pistol if it comes into USA in 127mm barrel configuration. In 9mm, 357Sig or 38 SUPER. I am Russian, I am European, so given half a chance I will buy Russian/European arms over anything else. Please, let me know when and how I can pre order one or how can I be put on a waiting list. I want this thing in my collection.

    • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

      First of all, let me clarify that I am a journalist, and albeit being extremely enthusiast of the Arsenal Firearms pistols for what they are (and believe me, they are REALLY good!), I am not representing commercially the company.

      Second, I have been asked to clarify some speculations around regarding the possible manufacture and/or assembly of models in Russia.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yXngE4G7zc

      The press conference footage at min.18:15 states clearly that facilities of Arsenal Firearms S.r.l. are in Italy. No other provenience of Arsenal pistols should be speculated.

  • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

    I have been asked today to clarify a few things, so let’s get this clear and straight.

    ARSENAL FIREARMS S.r.l. is based in Gardone Val Trompia (Brescia, Italy). No assumption regarding the place of manufacture of the firearms should be made outside of the fact that all the ARSENAL FIREARMS pistols bear the “Made in Italy” mark.

    The official explaination of what the Company is and where it is headquartered and produces its firearms is to be found here, in the footage of the official press conference:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yXngE4G7zc

    Any declaration regarding the provenience of ARSENAL FIREARMS guns from any other place than what is declared on the guns themselves is to be dismissed as mere speculations, as for today.

  • http://suburbansdomain.blogspot.com/ Suburban

    Nice miniskirt, Ivan! ;)

    Seriously. I’m the first one to post a joke about the miniskirt line?

  • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

    ATTENTION ALL READERS.

    I have spoken today with the Arsenal Firearms S.r.l. – Arsenal Group of Companies CEO, my dear friend mr. Nicola Bandini, who cleared me to clarify a further couple of things.

    Being the Arsenal Group of Companies the FIRST TRUE 50/50 JOINT-VENTURE BETWEEN RUSSIA AND A WESTERN COUNTRY in the field of firearms since the end of the Cold War, the development of the “Strike One” has proceeded step-by-step in both Countries at the same time; all patents have been filed under both the names of Nicola Bandini and Dimitry Streshinskiy.

    The pistols will be manufactured, now it’s official, in two different plants: as the AF-1 “Strike One”, for the European and generally Western commercial and Military/LE markets, in Gardone Val Trompia (BS – Italy), in a plant connected to the Tanfoglio establishment; and as the “Strizh”, for the Russian commercial/Military/LE market and for all the surrounding/depending markets (eastern Europe, central Asia, Middle East, Far East), in a state-of-the-art plant that is currently being set up in Moscow.

    EVERYBODY who might want to verify this fact can visit either of the two plants and see with his/her own eyes that both plants manufacture the gun entirely independently from one another, each for the different market area that it has had assigned.
    Both establishments also have their own autonomous/independent R&D sector; an Arsenal Group of Companies office in Wien (Austria) serves to keep ties.

    The Arsenal Group of Companies IS, of course, interested in marketing the “Strike One” (not the Russian-made “Strizh”) in markets other than the European one, including the U.S. market. Plans for distribution in the United States and/or elsewhere have however not yet been made official, and further declarations from the company should be awaited.

  • strongarm

    Barrel/Slide Locking best described as “Shrinked Walther P38 Type”.

    Shrinking achieved joining related rotationaly acting swinging elements
    from longitidunal lay out to linear sliding motion in vertical plane. There
    might be comments about similarity to Bergman System but, locking
    lugs at sides is not a feature involved in that construction. Longitidunal
    unlocking camming pin of P38 is also converted to transversal on Strike
    One. Similarity carries all good and bad points of Walther System as well.

    Single Action Trigger and Way of Field Stripping are archaic, further, cost
    of possible manufacture of locking system should be realised higher than
    current popular Browning type. Therefore, though a certain innovation
    being obvious, it would be, logicaly, not promising.

    Regarding to “Iceberg” similarity, it would be stated that, if “Over the
    Water” section carries such negative weighted features, no need to
    wonder about amount of lot at unseen part under the water.

    However, presentation and marketing efforts in connection with key
    organisations always beat logical mechanic configurations and the chance
    of success of Strike One, depends upon the work of owners of company
    and their possible accompanies in near future.

    • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

      I have to point out, sir, that there is not simply a couple of mistakes in your post; your entire post is a mistake.

      « Barrel/Slide Locking best described as “Shrinked Walther P38 Type”.

      Shrinking achieved joining related rotationaly acting swinging elements
      from longitidunal lay out to linear sliding motion in vertical plane. There
      might be comments about similarity to Bergman System but, locking
      lugs at sides is not a feature involved in that construction. Longitidunal
      unlocking camming pin of P38 is also converted to transversal on Strike
      One. Similarity carries all good and bad points of Walther System as well.»

      Absolutely NOT.
      The Walther P38 has a tilting block not unlike the Beretta M92-FS, in fact Beretta reprised the P38 tilting block for the 92. The “Strike One” uses a barrel kept fixed through a notch that is itself secured in its seat in the frame, in front of the trigger group, through a 4mm-wide passing pin. Similarities are more with the earlier MARS and LAHTI than with the Bergmann.

      « Single Action Trigger and Way of Field Stripping are archaic, further, cost of possible manufacture of locking system should be realised higher than current popular Browning type. Therefore, though a certain innovation being obvious, it would be, logicaly, not promising.»

      Once again, completely wrong. The single action trigger with internal rotating automatic safety device is a totally new feature, covered by international patent. The field-stripping of the “Strike One” is EXACTLY THE SAME OF THE GLOCK, except it first requires the removal of the pin that secures the barrel fixing notch; it can be done with the user’s own finger, or using a tool as elementary as a bullet tip, and the frame and pin have been engineered so that during the field-strip the pin itself will reach the end of its travel, releasing the barrel securing notch and thus allowing the Glock-style field-strip, but will not fall out of its seat, so you will not loose it even by mistake; to completely remove the pin from the frame, you’ll need to turn it counter-clockwise and then pull it out once the field-stripping is complete.

      Besides, professional users of the Colt 1911-A1 and Browning High-Power worldwide, not to mention special units that procured single-action only versions of the SIG-Sauer P-226 and P-228, wouldn’t call the single-action “obsolete”, right?

      As far as manufacturing costs are concerned, they are no higher than the manufacturing cost of the most direct competitors of the market (Caracal and Glock). This will make the “Strike One” go for a price that will remain under the 600€ limit in Europe and maybe under the 500/600US$ limit in the USA.

      «Regarding to “Iceberg” similarity, it would be stated that, if “Over the
      Water” section carries such negative weighted features, no need to
      wonder about amount of lot at unseen part under the water.»

      The weapon has been thoroughly tested under water and in “over-the-beach” capabilities, with no excessive weight or pressure problems in thousands of rounds fired. Once again you are talking about things you don’t know and you have not been informed about.

      «However, presentation and marketing efforts in connection with key
      organisations always beat logical mechanic configurations and the chance
      of success of Strike One, depends upon the work of owners of company
      and their possible accompanies in near future.»

      The mechanic configuration of the “Strike One” is adamantly logic and functional in its configuration, and your pun at the owners of the Company is completely out of place and I might even find it offensive, being I a personal acquaintance with one of the co-founders, Mr. Nicola Bandini, who has been in the business for over 20 years and is known to be a righteous, honest and down-to-earth family father, not to mention a great expert in its field.

      I have to point out that if the weapon looks “Odd”, “Strange” or whatever, well, its not the inventors’ fault if nobody else came out with such adamantly simple solutions to keep a low barrel axis and reduce muzzle climb, while mantaining recoil energies in one single directive (rearwards-forwards, not upwards), and thus making it more controllable. Not to my surprise, this is sparking a lot of odd comments, a lot of curiosity… and a lot of jealousy.

      The Italian gun press in fact has been notified that there are elements lurking the international firearms boards, either directly or indirectly under the directives of some of the most direct competitors, to troll, spam and sow falsities regarding the Arsenal Group of Companies and its products in order to put them in a difficult position on the market. I personally find these unfair behaviors, which are however fairly common in the firearms world, TOTALLY UNACCEPTABLE, and as a journalist I have an ethic code to follow that not only imposes me to avoid engaging in any kind of similar activity, but to expose it should I find any traces of it, and that’s what I will do. Hence why I strongly recommend all the readers of THE FIREARM BLOG to dismiss as conjectures and wild speculations with no grounds into reality (in the best ipothesis!) any declaration regarding the Arsenal Group of Companies and its products that doesn’t come from the Company itself or the very strict circle of gunwriters cleared to have first-hand informations and contacts with Arsenal Firearms, at least until the first field test-fire reports by qualified journalists will be published, which should happen in May, when a test-shoot session should be held in the Arsenal Firearms S.r.l. seat in Gardone Val Trompia (BS – Italy).

      Over and out.

      • strongarm

        Dear Mr. Pierangelo,

        It is rather hard to understand your sudden and raged response with
        confused comments.

        Please check my comment mailed 17th. of February. Most probably I am
        the first stating the possibe resemblance lock type with Bergman. But,
        after seeing the inside details, my thought has changed.

        Mars was a Bergman design, and Lahti was an improvement over it. All
        these pistols had a breechblock nestled within the barrel extention. Not
        a barrel within the slide or breechblock extention like “Strike One”. A Barrel
        within the one piece slide including the breechbolt as an integral unit at
        rear was a patented feature belonged to Mr. John M. Browning at beginning of Last Century. Nearly all current pistol lay out follow that
        configuration including “Strike One” and first sample with such kind a
        slide and separate lock piece was German Walther P38 and working space
        for that unit was under the breech and both sides in connection with
        slide, just like with “Strike One”. If a Bergman or Lahti Type conversion
        was present, it would be had a working space over the breech and under
        the slide, not at both sides. My description should be correct. If you are
        kind enough to share my comment with your friend Mr. Bandini, he will
        also accept its convenience. Besides, most reasonable cause for Beretta
        to use P38 type lock in 92 series, should be the intention to survive the
        image of “Open Top” barrels.

        Regarding to “Field Stripping”, please sincerely ask yourself, is Glock’s
        way is same with Strike One’s, The former needs only a lever to pushed
        down once on both diassambling and assambling, and the latter needs a
        push out of a tiny pin at beginning and another push that pin in at the
        end, or otherwise, if the second push is omitted, the pistol gets a risk
        of taken apart during usage.

        Single action lockwork may be considered adequate for all purpose by
        some users. But it is relative. A fully compressed firing element ready to
        go with a slight let off, by no means, carries the equal security with
        others having the same element on uncompresed or semi compressed
        form. What are the new impovements like DAK for. Can they be accepted
        as useless.

        As for cost of manufacture, is it possible to make a one piece barrel in
        same cost with manufacturing a precise barrel with guides and another
        precise lockpiece with equal precises. If one is equal to one plus one, it
        should be possible.

        Dear Mr.Pierangelo, I am not a friend of some brand’s manufacturer, I am
        neither an advocate of some brand nor a lover of another. I am only a
        gun lover with decades of firearm experience in practice and theory,
        and also a hopeful waiter for better designs over perfected accepted
        ones. Besides, I have no intention to survive a meaningless polemic. This
        is my last post about Strike One. Objective experts will of course evaluate
        my comments and time will show the corrects.

        Best lucks with your friends.

  • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

    ONCE AGAIN ATTENTION ALL READERS:

    I have read around too many comments regarding the mechanic configuration of the “Strike One” and the composition of the directive group of the Arsenal Firearms S.r.l. company that have no grounds in reality and that I might even find offensive, being I a personal acquaintance with one of the co-founders, Mr. Nicola Bandini, who has been in the business for over 20 years and is known to be a righteous, honest and down-to-earth family father, not to mention a great expert in its field.

    I have to point out that if the AF-1 “Strike One” pistol looks “Odd”, “Strange” or whatever, well, its not the inventors’ fault if nobody else came out with such adamantly simple solutions to keep a low barrel axis and reduce muzzle climb, while mantaining recoil energies in one single directive (rearwards-forwards, not upwards), and thus making it more controllable. Not to my surprise, this is sparking a lot of odd comments, a lot of curiosity… and a lot of jealousy.

    The Italian gun press in fact has been notified that there are elements lurking the international firearms boards, either directly or indirectly under the directives of some of the most direct competitors, to troll, spam and sow falsities regarding the Arsenal Group of Companies and its products in order to put them in a difficult position on the market. I personally find these unfair behaviors, which are however fairly common in the firearms world, TOTALLY UNACCEPTABLE, and as a journalist I have an ethic code to follow that not only imposes me to avoid engaging in any kind of similar activity, but to expose it should I find any traces of it, and that’s what I will do. Hence why I strongly recommend all the readers of THE FIREARM BLOG to dismiss as conjectures and wild speculations with no grounds into reality (in the best ipothesis!) any declaration regarding the Arsenal Group of Companies and its products that doesn’t come from the Company itself or the very strict circle of gunwriters cleared to have first-hand informations and contacts with Arsenal Firearms, at least until the first field test-fire reports by qualified journalists will be published, which should happen in May, when a test-shoot session should be held in the Arsenal Firearms S.r.l. seat in Gardone Val Trompia (BS – Italy).

    Over and out.

    • W

      hey thank you for your posts, very informative and they offer first insight into the pistol and company itself.

      • http://www.all4shooters.com/ Pierangelo Tendas

        You’re welcome!

  • Jim Watson

    I am interested.
    Low bore axis – good. A 9mm does not have to roll in the hand to moderate felt recoil like a .45 Peacemaker.
    Straight line action – interesting but significant mainly as it contributes to low bore.
    Single action trigger – Very important to me. It must be superior in weight of pull and smoothness to the Glock, XD, and M&P to keep my interest. My M&P trigger has been refined by gunsmith Dan Burwell to meet my needs.

    US Sales. I count 71 BATF points (If the adjustable sight has click adjustments. If not, I am sure they can be added at low cost, Glock has such a sight cheap enough to throw away and replace with fixed upon delivery to the US distribution point.)
    A 5 point loaded chamber indicator would qualify the S-1 for importation without interfering with any of its basic qualities.

  • e-mishka

    when will it be available in us?

  • P.G. Brown

    Was this video done with a .40 s&w/.357 sig or 9mm? If Arsenal Firearms wants to show the lack of muzzle flip they should do a comparison video of the Strike One in .40 s&w/.357 sig and a Glock 22/31.
    I would really like to see this in 10mm auto/9×25 Dillon and 7.62×25! Arsenal
    would really take the market if they did that!

    • P.G. Brown

      I forgot to mention the Caracal. That might be a better comparison.

    • nogpocTok90bIx

      I must agree about the 7.62×25 that would be nice in the sense of reviving the caliber, brining it back from the dead. As far as 10 mm and 9×25 they are not so popular, expensive and not everyone able to handle it. So those would be the guns people would by to sell 3 months later. Doesn’t make sense from commercial stand point. 9×19 and maybe .40 is all you need.

  • purc02
  • ross

    Wow, seriously heated discussion for a plastic gun than 99.9% of you have not even touched.

    Just wait a couple of months/years till its here and write a bunch of reviews on it.

    Either way competition is good for the customers as glock has monopolized the plastic gun sector for too long.

    And its tops a 1000.00 dollar decision either way, big deal get em’ both.

    I like it, it looks good.

  • Colt1911

    Hi

    1)When realsed this pistol Europe ???
    2)How much Euro and PLN(zł) ???

    Regards from Poland
    Artur

    • http://www.all4shooters.com/en/ Pierangelo Tendas

      Dearest Artur, mass production at the Italian-based factory for the European civilian market will not start before September 2012 – and even then a couple more months will have to pass before the company has sufficient stock to start mass distribution, which has been announced for the 4th quarter 2012/1st quarter 2013.

      Pricing for the civilian market has been slated to remain under the 600€ line.

  • http://www.coachparadisejp.com/ コーチ アウトレット

    Generally I don’t read article on blogs, however I wish to say that this write-up very forced me to take a look at and do so! Your writing taste has been amazed me. Thanks, quite great post.

    • spellcheck

      “Generally I don’t read article on blogs, however(comma) I wish to say that this write-up very (remove very) forced me to take a look at and do so (oh my god, please rewrite this!)! Your writing taste has been (remove been) amazed me. Thanks, quite (a) great post.”

      I hate you, dude.

      • Spellchecker

        Shut the fu*k up beeotch! Get out of your moms basement..
        D
        O
        U
        C
        H
        E

  • Carlo

    Good army! public the video in http://www.videoarmietiro.com

  • Erik

    Looks like this will be an interesting competitor in the ‘plastic pistol’ category and I’m looking forward to seeing a parts diagram and other drawings so I can figure out how it really works.

    The one thing we can see pretty clearly is the barrel locking mechanism, but I don’t really see that as a advantage. It’s fundamentally a dropping block type, though innovatively designed. It IS going to be a little weaker than a tilting barrel gun. You can see clearly that the slide is pretty thin on either side of the locking block, though it looks stronger than a Beretta 92. The block itself has four lugs, but they’re fairly small lugs. I think it’s going to be strong enough for it purpose, but not as strong as something like a Glock or a Sig.

    This business of ‘heavy metal re-enforcement’ sounds very dubious. Just how does one re-enforce something made of carbon steel?

    Arsenal’s stated reason for this design is to keep the barrel movement linear for the fitment of certain accessories. Certainly this design is ideal if you want to attach anything to the barrel, but I just can’t see many people using the the sort of things Arsenal has shown off, whether military, police or civilian. Most people who need a carbine are better served with a real carbine.

    I haven’t read Arsenal saying anything about increased accuracy from this system, which is good because it won’t provide any intrinsic accuracy boost from the locking block mechanism. As in almost all auto pistols, the barrel still tilts to come out during disassembly, so all the clearances between slide and barrel needed for tilting still have to be done even if the barrel doesn’t tilt during operation. Clearances and machining tolerance are real source of mechanical inaccuracy in a pistol. They can, of course, increase accuracy with better slide to barrel fitting, though that will have all the same drawbacks as in any other auto pistol.

    I hate to harp on about this, since the ‘Strike One’ looks like a good design in general from the limited information available, and I don’t think this choice of locking system will have any real negative effect; I just don’t see any positive effect for the extra effort. A shame, since I like innovative, out-of-the-box design; but from a pragmatic, engineering perspective, I can’t see this as a design feature others would want to imitate, even were it not patented.

  • Mark Holcomb

    Interesting. But what real advantages does it offer over a Ruger, M&P, TP-9, XD, Canik Arms, HK, FN, and other 9mm pistols? One effect it could have is forcing the aforementioned competitors to lower prices, and that is a good thing, too. Discuss…