Trigger Trainer

The Trigger Trainer is a training device that purportedly helps to improve trigger pull.

It makes sense, although I would prefer to use a more realistic trigger that actuates a sear.

The Trigger Trainer is $45 and $10 for a set of additional springs.



Steve Johnson

Founder and Dictator-In-Chief of TFB. A passionate gun owner, a shooting enthusiast and totally tacti-uncool. Favorite first date location: any gun range. Steve can be contacted here.


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  • OR you could get some snap caps.

  • jinw00t

    What is this “Dryfiring is a bad idea”? Why would they say this?

    • slim934

      I can’t IMAGINE why they might possibly say that.

      Oh wait…yes I can. Cause then they won’t be able to sell this silly little product.

    • Tinkerer

      Back in the days, dryfiring a firearm -that is, letting the hammer or striker slam forward without a nice and soft cap to receive the blunt of the strike-, would lead to cracked firing pins. Hence, the need for snap caps and similar devices.

      Now, imagine you want to train your trigger finger outside of the firing range, in a place where it would be illegal -or just frowned upon- to carry your firearm. What would you do? Just forget about training? Or use a device that would allow you to train even when you can’t have your piece with you?

      • AKMSF

        I don’t know about you, but I dry fire at home, I don’t just walk into a cafe and whip out my gun and start dry firing it while sipping a mocha. Dry firing trains you on YOUR trigger, on keeping the sights on target, and on the trigger reset. This product cannot do that.

    • W

      dry firing modern firearms is harmless. If you have a collectors H&H rifle or even old M1, however, dry firing isn’t the best thing to do. My opinion is that if you want to improve your fundamentals, it is far more useful to dry fire your rifle to acquire the familiarity of the firearm.

  • Deputy Bravo

    I think this is great for people who work in an office or business environment. It looks like a child’s squirt gun and would not attract undue attention. It’s not as good as using an ACTUAL trigger and sear…but for people who are trapped in an office, this opens new options for them.

  • This looks like something you’d see at 2am in the morning on an informercial.

  • Zack

    For dealing with a crowd of people new to shooting, a box full of those things might have some potential as classroom training aids.

  • I understand the assumption if tigger control works for real firearms it has to work for paintball but the real fact of the matter is that 80% of paintball markers today use a “double trigger” that trips a sensor and the way you activate that tigger is very different. Most paintballers practice “walking the trigger ” to build up their rate of fire in semi auto firing mode

  • BumDog

    Yeah, I was just sitting in at the dinner table with my inlaws thinking I could be training my trigger finger while I’m here…I wish someone would invent something like those exercise machines As Seen on TV that in only 10 minutes a day I could shoot like my buddy Denny who’s foolishly dry fired his gun and practiced on the range for 30 years to make him a great shot….and wham….here it is! Trigger Trainer …where have you been all my life?
    Come on…get real….get some snap caps for 12 bucks and do some range time and don’t waste yer money on an over priced squirt gun clone that’s made from plastic and will do nothing more than clean your pocket of $45 and $10 for additional springs……….hey….wanna buy a Thigh Master?

    • Komrad

      If you’re really cheap, you can even just use a spent case.

  • Thank you for your honest opinions. I am not completely dismissing Dry-Firing, however because of the number of negligent discharges, several Federal and local Police departments have policies for thier officers that strictly forbid dry-firing outside of the range.

    The trigger was designed so the user could focus on practicing pulling the trigger straight to the rear. This same straight rearward motion is effective with all trigger types.

    Thaks again for the feedback.

    • You need to remove the negative comment about dry firing and put that it is more safe that dry firing. Do it without all the drama. The device loses a lot of respect at that point. Also, including a mechanism to give the feel of a breaking sear definitely should be there. Just pulling weight with your finger doesn’t improve your trigger pull. An individual also needs to practice their follow through after the sear release and then reset. The device doesn’t allow for it and makes it pretty gimmicky and hard to believe. Finally, being someone with a RA like disease, if you made the above changes, I would market it to those with the need to rebuild strength in their hands and fingers do to injury, disease, or age. Just my .02.

      You are also welcome to email me for some more thoughts.

      Jason@thearmorygroup.com

  • Full Fail Tactics

    The whole point of marksmanship is making sure that your sights are lined up on the target at the exact moment that the bullet leaves the barrel. That’s the reason why it’s important to pull the trigger perfectly straight to the rear. If there are no sights on the Trigger Trainer, how do you know that you’re doing it right?!

  • Doug

    They should’ve molded in some sights.

  • Stanley

    This is possibly the second silliest thing I’ve seen. Is this for training when you can’t use your water pistol? $45.00?

  • JScottNH

    I have an old guitar finger strengthening device that I use to get a workout on all ten fingers… My opinion? If it doesn’t have a sear simulation and reset, it isn’t worth $45

  • That’s pretty cool, but a tennis ball or a racquet ball is cheaper (free if you look hard enough).

    • Tennis/racquet balls will eventually loose their elastic properties, making it easier over time to squeeze it. One of the corner stones of exercise science, is progressive overload…the ability to make subtle increases in the resistance use. Without this ability to increase the resistance, you’re not not going to provide sufficient resistance to ensure constant progress. Now, most people might argue “Why not just squeeze the ball for a higher number of repetitions?” Answer: because at some point, you go from strengthening to working on strength endurance. And in order to build strength endurance, you first need strength to endure.

      • John Doe

        “Tennis/racquet balls will eventually loose their elastic properties”

        Buy another one, they’re cheap.

  • JT

    I would think that Plyometrics would be the ticket. It increases grip and joint strength and would improve the entire system (hands, arms, shoulders, chest) instead of just the hands and parts of the forearms

    • Plyos improve rate of force development -“power,” not strength. Plus, the average person is no where near the conditioning needed to physiologically handle the high forces encountered in plyo exercises. Their joints will disintegrate like month old Olive Garden breadsticks.

    • JT

      heh. probably so. I know I’ve noticed a lot more grip strength since making up my own exercises with weighted metal bars, swinging, then retracting back. very easy to pull something and very difficult to gauge my workout intensity, but at least grip strength “feels” improved. I’ve never seen anything like it (clubbells are swinging, but not stopping and retracting and sledgehammers are swinging then releasing if I have them correct)

  • Hammy Hamster

    I know this sounds crazy, but why not dry fire the guns you have?

    inb4thatruinsthegun; well if you’re so afraid of dry firing your center-fire gun then you most likely weren’t shooting it that much to begin with.

  • Mr. Fahrenheit

    I don’t think I’ve ever dry fired my guns without looking down the sights. While it may be important to pull your trigger finger straight back, I also think strong and weak hand control come into play.

    When I first got into shooting, so many years ago, I purchased a cheap toy cap gun to practice holding a firearm with my finger off the trigger. Muscle memory and all. I don’t think I spent more than $5. I imagine the same toy gun would have been useful for dry firing practice.

    I dry fire my revolvers before and after every range visit while standing before the target in the lane. I never use caps. It violates my own rule about putting things in the gun that don’t belong there.

    But, to each his own. Good luck to these guys. Maybe the next version will have some sights.

  • Hey, you might as well buy the plans for this, 10 bucks, at least it shoots rubber bands, and have it made in the USA:

    http://www.ponoko.com/make-your-own/toys/elastomatik-plans-7562

    Even in Acrylic, cut and sent to you, it costs just a little more than that thing and the springs…

    Oh, and the spring, it’s just another rubber band!

  • MrMaigo

    If you have no way of knowing your form is correct, you might as well just wiggle your finger

  • Nate

    Gimmick, no replacement for range time.

  • Scott

    Another version of one of these – http://photo-dictionary.com/phrase/4482/hand-exercise-grip.html – and just as effective

  • Slim

    Using this product in an office scenario, I think you would be getting a lot of odd looks, and even more when you explained why you are using it. That being said I may consider this product, but not at that price.

    I have found shooting my Nagant 1895, using only double action only, prior to my other pistols has really improved my trigger control. The fact that it takes about 20lbs to work it, and focusing on keeping the sights steady, it has really improved my shooting ability with other revolvers and semi’s. I have even become fairly accurate with the Nagant using only double action. If you want something that is not expensive (under $200), has sights, and having an actual trigger and sear, then get one. You can get a conversion for .32 acp to make it cheaper to shoot.

  • Matt G.

    This isn’t a “dry fire trainer”. It’s just a finger grip exerciser. Absolutely zero relation to an actual gun trigger. You should be using a grip master to exercise your whole hand anyway if you want to be a good shooter. This thing is kinda silly.

    • Nater

      Most competition pistol shooters do a LOT of whole hand exercising. All things being equal, more grip strength is always a plus when shooting a hand gun. Just ask Bob Vogel, he’s a skinny guy with the hand strength of your average 250lb power lifter.

  • JT

    I still can’t figure out how this benefits anyone. If you want to give yourself a challenge and improve, buy a cheap POS pocket gun with a garbage trigger, then switch to a decent gun. At least with that you can practice FTF’s and FTE’s

  • John Doe

    It’s silly, but great for us who have nothing better to do at work.

  • Alex-mac

    A good idea in theory but practically useless cause they forgot to give it a laser and/or pistols sights. Might actually make you have less trigger control.

  • Marine

    Hey, look, something to strengthen all five fingers: http://www.prohands.net

    Pulling a trigger is not a strength issue. Give a little old lady enough adrenaline, and she will lift a car. Pulling a trigger is extreme skill and finesse (sp?). Best way to master your trigger is to pull your trigger. Buying a made for TV device could eventually help you do better push ups… But so could getting down on your fat face and sweating on your carpet.

    Of course there is risk dry-firing (I’m a gunsmith, btw; use snap caps. Even modern guns wear down). Risk is a good thing. It makes you be careful. I have a habit of checking the snap cap three times while holding the gun upside down. This sounds silly, but it is a training ritual to ensure, consciously, every time that I am switching my brain to “training mode” and telling my brain that this loading of the training round is a different act that admistrative loading live rounds for concealed carry or whathaveyou.

    How about instead of creating another device for feeding our lazy mindset tendencies, we attack the real problem: lack of commitment in specific actions, especially training with firearms, and laziness. If you have a gun for self defense or home defense, then there should be no mistaking the issue: you have chosen to become at least a part time gun fighter. That doesn’t mean you are a Navy SEAL, but the time you do spend training to use said piece should definitely be spent without illusion and false confidence. Research, practice, train, repeat…

    That is all.

  • Marine

    Hey, look, something to strengthen all five fingers: http://www.prohands.net

    Puclling a trigger is not a strength issue. Give a little old lady enough adrenaline, and she will lift a car. Pulling a trigger is extreme skill and finesse (sp?). Best way to master your trigger is to pull your trigger. Buying a made for TV device could eventually help you do better push ups… But so could getting down on your fat face and sweating on your carpet.

    Of course there is risk dry-firing (I’m a gunsmith, btw; use snap caps. Even modern guns wear down). Risk is a good thing. It makes you be careful. I have a habit of checking the snap cap three times while holding the gun upside down. This sounds silly, but it is a training ritual to ensure, consciously, every time that I am switching my brain to “training mode” and telling my brain that this loading of the training round is a different act that admistrative loading live rounds for concealed carry or whathaveyou.

    How about instead of creating another device for feeding our lazy mindset tendencies, we attack the real problem: lack of commitment in specific actions, especially firearms training, and laziness…

  • Gunther

    In 1988 I made an exact copy of my S&W model 37 (butt and trigger) to do the same job. Some wood, epoxi clay and a tension spring.