Gun Review: Sig Sauer Traditional 1911 Compact

NOTE: This product review was made possible by GunsForSale.com.  To get up-to-date information on where to find compact pistols for sale, please visit GunsForSale.com.

When I think of all the brands of firearms available today and which brand has the highest quality throughout the product line I immediately think of Sig Sauer. No matter which criteria you consider, fit, finish, reliability, durability and accuracy there is certainly no other brand that produces more desirable models in my experience. They produce models for casual shooting, military, law enforcement and CCW. It seems there’s a Sig to fit any need.

My experience with Sig pistols began in 1979 with the Browning BDA in 45 acp. Of course it was a Sig but the Browning name meant more to me at that time. The only downside to this model was the magazine release on the heel of the grip rather than the American push button release behind the trigger guard. This was the first Sig I had seen. Heck I never had shot one. I bought it anyway and was glad I did.

I used that pistol for some time until the actual Sig pistols came out with the American magazine release. Most semi autos of the time had reliability problems but not the Sig. It feed and worked with anything I loaded into it. Even the old Lawman “Flying Ashtray” which was notorious for jamming any gun that hadn’t been worked over by a gunsmith who knew what he was doing. I was also carrying Colt 1911’s at the time. I hadn’t yet learned to carry one type of gun rather than changing guns daily depending on my mood.

Skip forward to 2003 with the release of the Sig 1911. After all these years I could have a Sig and a 1911! My relationship with Sig 1911’s has continued to this day. When I learned Sig was making a departure from it’s unique 1911 design and offering a “Traditional” model I requested one for review. There are several of these offered, from the full size match version to the compact. I chose the compact for review. I had to wait a bit to get this one because of it’s increasing popularity.

From years ago until today these are one of the most if not the most reliable pistols you can buy. The Sig 1911’s are no exception.

When I got this pistol home I took a good look at it giving some of the design features some thought. There are a few changes that Sig has made to areas of the pistol that do make it more user friendly. For instance the beavertail has a larger lower pad with a slightly increased angle for a more positive release of the grip safety without using as much grip pressure. The upper part of the beavertail is scalloped out on both sides allowing that part of the thumb to ride in that notch making it easier for the shooter to use a high thumb hold. I’ve always used the high hold, which is resting your thumb on top of the thumb safety while shooting. Even though this model doesn’t come with an ambidextrous thumb safety both sides of the beavertail are rounded out should the new owner want to add an ambidextrous safety. The front of the grip has a very pronounced cutout under the rear of the trigger guard allowing the shooters hand to maintain a firm grip. Of course the checkering helps the most but this cutout helps a great deal and just feels good when manipulating the pistol.

The barrel is slightly over four inches in length and does use a barrel bushing unlike many that use a bushingless barrel with this barrel length. The grip is an officers model rather than a full size. This allows each magazine to hold seven rounds plus one round chambered. When you consider what really makes a pistol concealable this setup makes perfect sense. The grip is the most difficult part to conceal and keep from printing through clothing. The barrel length, up to a point, makes no difference in concealment especially with an IWB holster.

Standard Sig 1911 features are a skeletonized trigger that breaks crisp right at four pounds. The trigger also has an adjustment screw for overtravel. A new trend with thumb safeties is a smaller profile. The Sig uses an example of this having reduced length while maintaining extra width. This works just as well since the first knuckle of the thumb manipulates the safety. Sig also uses the external extractor. They got this extractor right the first time and will remain a standard feature I’m sure.

All models of the Traditional have Novak low profile night sights. The magwell is also beveled for easy magazine insertion. The magazine release button is slightly extended but not enough to be activated by holstering or drawing. All Sig 1911’s use the series 80 safety system as well. I much prefer a series 70 type but Sig did a good job on the trigger in spite of the series 80 safety. There is a way to remove the series 80 parts. However, for legal reasons I would advise against it on a carry pistol.

Statistics

Item Number 1911TCO-45-SSS
Caliber .45ACP
Action Type SAO
Trigger Pull DA N/A
Trigger Pull SA 4 lbs
Overall Length 7.7 in
Overall Height 4.8 in
Overall Width 1.4 in
Barrel Length 4.2 in
Sight Radius 5.7 in
Weight w/Mag 36.5 oz
Mag Capacity 7 Rounds
Sights Low-profile Night Sights
Grips Custom blackwood grips
Frame Finish Natural Stainless
Slide Finish Natural Stainless
Accessory Rail No
Features Custom Blackwood grips,round top traditional slide, beavertail frame
MSRP $1,099.00

Range Time

I took an assortment of ammunition from Guns For Sale.com including Remington 230 grain ball, PMC 230 grain ball and two bulk packs of Winchester white box 230 grain ball. I also had on hand 50 rounds of assorted hollowpoints ranging from 185 grain to 230 grains.

I did lube the Sig prior to heading to the range. During this extended range session I did not clean or add additional lube to the pistol. All total 400 rounds were fired. I used Wilson, Sig and McCormick mags. When firing the hollowpoints I mixed the various brands and bullet weights. I used a combination of aimed slow fire as well as rapid fire. There were NO malfunctions of any type throughout the entire shooting session. Overall this pistol was flawless in performance.

I really was a bit surprised that I didn’t have any problems at all. I thought since I mixed the hollowpoints and shot those last when the pistol was very dirty I would have at least one failure but it just ran perfectly.

Accuracy was what I expected with the group pictured below fired from 10 yards. A total of 28 rounds are in this group. I did throw two rounds low which was entirely my fault. The gusting 35 MPH winds didn’t help any however☺

Conclusion

There were no surprises during this review. The perfect performance during the range session was somewhat surprising. As I mentioned I expected to have something go haywire when mixing hollowpoints in a brand new dirty pistol.

Since that session I’ve been to the range a couple of times and fired another 200 rounds, again with no malfunctions whatsoever. I just couldn’t find any fault with this Sig 1911. People can say what they want about it being an antique design but this is one pistol I would take into harms way without hesitation.

Update 11/23/2011

Just for the readers information I took this Sig to the range again today and fired an additional 175 rounds with no malfunctions:-) That brings the total to 575 rounds.



Phil White

Retired police officer with 30 years of service. Firearms instructor and SRU team member. I still instruct with local agencies. My daily carry pistol is the tried and true 1911. I’m the Associate Editor and moderator at TFB. I really enjoy answering readers questions and comments. We can all learn from each other about our favorite hobby!


Advertisement

  • carter

    In a time when a person can drop 3 to 4 grand on a production “custom” 1911 it’s nice to see reasonable alternatives.

    • Phil White

      carter,

      Very true and I can tell you from my viewpoint I’d never pay those huge prices a custom pistol when I can buy one of these for 1/3 the price!

      • Matt G.

        If i was to buy another 1911, I think it might be one of these. I love that they kept the longer barrel, and love the safety, longer than the GI but short enough that it won’t bite my big ‘ol hands, and I really like the trigger, looks just like the nightforce trigger on my 1911;).

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          It does carry well. If they made an alloy one you probably wouldn’t even notice it’s there. I’d like to see more safeties like this one since I use such a high grip.
          The trigger is nice. It’s not flat like some S&W Koenigs but that flat area fits the trigger finger well.

  • Nathaniel

    I am surprised it performed that well. SIG’s QC has been extremely disappointing of late.

    • Phil White

      Nathaniel,

      Nathaniel I never expected to fire that many rounds and not have something happen. It really is that good and it will be hard to send this one back!

  • Lance

    Another good review.

    • Phil White

      Lance,

      Thank you Lance I appreciate it very much!

  • Komrad

    I would personally like some reviews of non-1911 firearms. The 1911 is a good design, but it isn’t the only one out there or even the only good one. Let’s see some weird stuff too.

    • Phil White

      Komrad,

      Don’t be disappointed I have some unique guns either on the way or ordered:-)

  • SpudGun

    ‘which brand has the highest quality throughout the product line I immediately think of Sig Sauer’ – I think that Colt, HK, Walther, Springfield, Sphinx, Wilson and about a dozen other companies might dispute this claim, I know I would.

    ‘From years ago until today these are one of the most if not the most reliable pistols you can buy’ – Yes because Glocks, M&Ps, Browning Hi-Powers, USPs, XDMs, CZs, etc. could never compete in the reliability stakes. Oh wait, I disagree.

    ‘I really was a bit surprised that I didn’t have any problems at all’ – From the most reliable pistol you can buy? Even after breaking it in with 400 rounds of ball ammo? Yes, it is truly amazing in this day and age that a pistol can fire hollowpoint ammunition without jamming.

    The great thing about getting a gun for review is that you can just brush over the $1100 price tag.

    • Phil White

      SpudGun,

      Hi guy–that is full retail so there is no way you’ll see one priced at full retail unless it’s in California. A good friend in SanDiego says they actually are selling guns above retail in his area. It depends on what part of the country you buy one from but I’d say $800 or so is the high end price most places around here.
      Everyone has favorites but I can’t really compare a custom Wilson lets say to a factory pistol like this Sig. What surprised me was firing 400 rounds and having it black on the inside and still feed assorted hollowpoints out of the same mag. I’ve owned and shot more Hi Powers than I can remember and they tend to need a little help in the reliability department. Anyway, just my take on it.

      • SpudGun

        Hi Phil,

        I too have fired many a Hi-Power and have found them to be much more durable and reliable then many an old 1911. If however, you want to compare an old Hi-Power to a brand new production Sig 1911 based on one trip to the range, then you are more then free to do so.

        Your assertion that Sig produces the highest quality throughout it’s product line and that the 1911 is the most reliable pistol design ever is contentious at best and misleading at worst.

        It is a shame that your latest review lacks any critical merit, normally I look forward to reading what you have to say. This resembles more of a ‘puff piece’ often associated with Guns and Ammo.

        However, I do realize that both the pistol and the ammunition were supplied to you gratis and on loan and that certain editorial pressures are put upon the reviewer for the sake of continued supply and good will.

        That is my take on it.

        • Phil White

          SpudGun,

          Just to break things down a bit. I get a small amount of ammo sometimes but the vast majority is out of my pocket. A for instance would be this review. I fired 100 rounds of donated ammo with the other 400 rounds paid for out of my pocket and that’s a chunk of change (over $200)! I did make a couple of additional trips to the range that I mentioned toward the end of the review. The guns are sent without shipping cost but I pay for return shipping on most of them.
          The 1911 isn’t the most reliable ever.That may be a misunderstanding since I meant Sig pistols in general. This one was the most reliable 1911 I’ve shot ever! Believe me I did look for something to be critical about but to be honest with you guys there just wasn’t anything bad to say with this particular 1911. I hope you know I would have told you if I could have found anything. In this rare case I couldn’t find anything to find fault with.

    • SpudGun

      Thanks for letting me know Phil, I’m glad that your integrity isn’t for sale. As mentioned previously, I do look forward to your reviews, but you can imagine my suspicions when a reviewer (any reviewer) claims to have a flawless experience with a new firearm.

      Let’s hope that Sig sent you a typical example from their production line rather then a pristine model worked over by their custom shop.

      And because it is so easy to negatively criticize, I will end on a positive. The Sig Trad Compact is an exceptionally attractive pistol – I really like the proportions, finish and checkering and though some might be offended by front slide serrations, I’m not one of them.

      • Phil White

        SpudGun,

        I do understand you suspicions. We are all conditioned by some print publications to expect a flawless gun with every review. Heck, that’s why I started writing in the first place. I was tired of those all guns are perfect all the time reviews!
        I honestly think it is a regular production gun. I looked at the internals and couldn’t find anything to indicate the sear, hammer engagement, extractor etc had been polished above standard production work.
        It is a good looking pistol and like you I like the front slide serrations. I have to say at first I wasn’t fond of them but after using them I grew to appreciate the ability to check the pistols status without using the old press check method.

      • Matt G.

        Meaning no disrespect Phil, but I have to agree with alot of the stuff Spud said. I didn’t even read the review after the first paragraph. Your reviews start out with waay too much gushing admiration. I don’t want you to stop doing them, just want you to know how I’m seeing them.

        A good reviewer has to be neutral. He starts out by giving history on the gun or type, gives info on how it works and what its capabilities are, including it’s downsides, and then describes his experience at the range.

        He doesn’t start off by telling you how this gun/brand is the best ever at this or that, he doesn’t say stuff like “I think we all can agree that…” because there will never, ever, be a subject that everyone will agree on. Jesus himself could come down from on high and bring all our dead loved ones back to life and solve world hunger and there would still be someone who thought he was a fake.

        Some of your reviews are fine Phil, but this one sounded like it was copy and pasted from Guns and Ammo.

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          Matt if you didn’t read the entire review you didn’t get the entire picture. I did give the history of the gun, company and other points you mentioned just no negatives. I always try to include those points negatives included if they are warranted. I realized when I wrote this I would receive comments that it was too positive. I don’t consider it as gushy just positive on a job well done by Sig on this “Traditional”. I have to be fair and take my knocks if need be to state what my convictions honestly are towards an individual gun. It wouldn’t be fair to criticize a gun if the company did a fine job making a particular gun. It wouldn’t be fair to the readers either yourself included.
          I’m not insulted nor do I believe you mean any disrespect at all by your comment. Not all guns have negatives to report and to be honest this one just had none to pass along. I was genuinely very impressed with this pistol. It’s the last line of the review but I really would go in harms way with this pistol. That’s saying a lot when you have been in that position more than once on duty and off.

      • W

        here’s a idea: it is his review and he can write whatever he wants in it. If he likes SIG, so what!? The irony is that a lot of the critics of this review are notorious for posting how perfect the 1911 or AR15 is and that there are no better products out there.

        In defense of Phil, the time he was talking about (1979 ish), semi-automatics were finnicky. Of course there was the outstanding Browning High Power and 1911, though these pistols were not largely standardized by american law enforcement agencies. SIG was among the first companies to sell user friendly, plug and play what we know as “modern” handguns to the market. While other semi-automatics were sensitive to ammunition and required hand fitted parts (and a good gunsmith), SIGs held a advantage over those weapons.

        Citing a few bad apples from SIG (the P250 and 556 rifle) doesn’t immediately dismiss the company as lazy or fading in quality. the same thing can be said about other companies as well.

        I believe that the handgun reviewed is a outstanding weapon. it delights me to see more 1911’s and AR15s. One should not be surprised why these firearms remain immensely popular in the United States.

        • Phil White

          W,

          My thoughts exactly and that is the timeline my first experiences I referred to were based on. Without using ball ammo a semi auto of the day such as a 1911 or Hi-Power was in need of a very good gunsmith as you said. I used Bill Wilson at that time when he still worked out of his Dad’s jewelry store. It’s funny now but very few people knew who Bill Wilson was at the time:-)

      • Matt G.

        “In defense of Phil, the time he was talking about (1979 ish), semi-automatics were finnicky. Of course there was the outstanding Browning High Power and 1911, though these pistols were not largely standardized by american law enforcement agencies. SIG was among the first companies to sell user friendly, plug and play what we know as “modern” handguns to the market. While other semi-automatics were sensitive to ammunition and required hand fitted parts (and a good gunsmith), SIGs held a advantage over those weapons.”

        And, if this review had been written then, that would matter. But it was written now, when Sigs latest products have fallen short of their stellar reputation. Hopefully this new product will help to correct that downward trend.

        “here’s a idea: it is his review and he can write whatever he wants in it. If he likes SIG, so what!? The irony is that a lot of the critics of this review are notorious for posting how perfect the 1911 or AR15 is and that there are no better products out there.”

        A lot of what critics? The only people I see criticizing the review currently are me and spudgun. I don’t know about spud but I have not been professing my undying love for the AR platform on this forum. Your post just strengthens my deductions from yesterday. “W” is just trolling this thread like he was the other one.

      • Matt G.

        I wasn’t criticizing the review, which I have since read to correct my mistake, just the first paragraph were I believe you were overly praising Sigs products, which are no doubt very good on the whole, but lacking in recent iterations.

        Praising an entire brand as perfect and wonderful because one gun is great is not a good idea. You mentioned your past experiences with Sigs being great, but the past, unfortunately, does not completely reflect upon the present for sig, It is true, you had no problems with this gun, and maybe it has no downsides to you, but the rest of Sigs line does have some flaws, and so that should factor into your assessment of the brand. Sig has always made their pistols a little bigger than they needed to be, the controls do not work for everyone, and they have been surpassed in the reliability department by the likes of Glock, so I would not say they are the best overall brand out there. But I would definitely trust an older p226 with my life.

        I am not trying to deny you your opinion, which is of course your own to defend. But I want to help you approach these reviews more objectively as that is why we all love this blog and why it’s the most popular gun blog.

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          Well I wouldn’t say perfect. Geez I didn’t say that did I:-) Any mechanical device is inherently not perfect. I guess the best way to put it is if somebody took a line of boxes and filled them with assorted guns and each was marked with the name of a major brand I’d most likely grab one from the Sig box. Hey by the way help me out here. Which guns have you heard have problems? If I recanted I would put in the “P” series as the best—-
          I didn’t think you were criticizing I hope I didn’t give that impression.

      • Matt G.

        “Matt,

        Well I wouldn’t say perfect. Geez I didn’t say that did I:-) Any mechanical device is inherently not perfect. I guess the best way to put it is if somebody took a line of boxes and filled them with assorted guns and each was marked with the name of a major brand I’d most likely grab one from the Sig box. Hey by the way help me out here. Which guns have you heard have problems? If I recanted I would put in the “P” series as the best. I didn’t think you were criticizing I hope I didn’t give that impression.”

        If this was 5 years ago I would completely agree about the reaching into a box thing. I’m a Sig fan, love the design(just wish they would slim them down a bit) and reliability.

        As for models, the biggest fail is the P250. They are too big, the trigger is about a million pound pull and not very nice at that, and damn near every agency/government that picked it up has since dropped it do to unreliability. Even just recently Germany(I think it was German police or something) dropped the p250 after they approved it. In the press release they even mentioned something to the tune of “we have lost faith in pistol and in the company to back it up”.

        Next after that is the sig mosquito, but as j said that’s made by Umarex. But sig should still guard their name and reputation more closely.

        The Sig556, made in USA I believe, has general QC issues and some reliability complaints. Stuff falling off, barrels misaligned, sights comin off. While the other sig55x series rifles made in Germany are fine.

        In a more general sense, the costumer service has slowed down. sig apperantly started farming out certain parts a few years ago to drop prices and pretty much all of the p-series pistols(at least the ones made in the us) are having random general QC problems. Blemishes, scuffs, marks, improper fits. When I get around to buying a sig it will be an older used model or one straight from Germany.

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          Have you seen the German P228’s from the Guns America auction site? They range from $389–$469 or so. Used Swiss police pistols. They have the usual wear but probably shot very little. That might be something to look into.

      • Vyse

        Personally, I thought this was a well written review. I have read plenty of reviews, and know that 95% of them read out as free advertisement for the company sending the review model. Putting 400+ rounds through a firearm is more than enough to prove a particular firearm as terrible/excellent. Citing other models (P250, .22’s) as being less than stellar does nothing for this post, as it is about the Sig 1911 and not about the Sig brand.

        Bias will exist in everything as well, as that is human nature. If the only [insert BEST handgun ever] I ever shot malfunctioned twice per magazine, I would probably question the hype as well. On the flip side, if I only had good experiences with a brand, my thoughts would be positive towards the firearm(s). Either way, I’m glad to see someone responding to all posts as well, and not just glancing at the negative responses and moving on. I appreciate what you do.

        • Phil White

          Vyse,

          Thank you Vyse I’m glad you enjoyed the review and appreciate the responses to readers such as yourself. I’ve always felt I should be involved with the readers not only to help clarify or expand my views but answer questions as well. I always learn something from fellow shooters as well so it really is a give and take from all involved.
          Something I had happen on an AK review a while back was a comment/request from a lady for an autographed photo. Well I knew it wasn’t for me–LOL! Picking through the comment it turns out it was meant for the show “Sons of Guns”. She figured since the review was about an AK it had to be somebody from the show writing the review. To make this short I made contact with her and clarified what I thought the intent was and contacted Chris at Sons of Guns. They sent an autographed photo to her as a present for her little boy come Christmas. Her son watches the show and mods his Nerf guns:-) The point is interacting with readers has it’s rewards beyond what you expect:-)

          Your turn to respond SpudGun:-)

      • Matt G.

        “Matt,

        Have you seen the German P228′s from the Guns America auction site? They range from $389–$469 or so. Used Swiss police pistols. They have the usual wear but probably shot very little. That might be something to look into.”

        Definitely. Not only do you get a Pistol that has proven itself over the years(if it was a lemon it wouldn’t still be around), but you also get one with some character(wear) and you get it for cheap!

      • W

        “Your post just strengthens my deductions from yesterday. “W” is just trolling this thread like he was the other one.”

        yeah speak for yourself cupcake. thank you for demonstrating you don’t like it when people ask questions or question popular contention in pursuit of fact.

    • SpudGun

      @W – ‘here’s a idea: it is his review and he can write whatever he wants in it.’

      That is certainly an idea, however, not a very good one. If you are presenting a statement as fact, then I would like some qualitative proof to back up that fact. I can understand armchair commentators on the comments section just spouting off any old bullcrap, but Phil has been elevated to a position of trust and as such, must be held under greater scrutiny.

      Like many others, I enjoy Phil’s reviews and I’m glad they are part of The Firearm Blog. If anyone has a question or disagreement with his review, he’s straight on here providing information or explaining his reasoning. However, his good nature and love of firearms doesn’t give him carte blanche to proclaim unsupportive statements without being challenged.

      Luckily for us, Phil takes it all in his stride and with good grace.

      • Matt G.

        Once again I must concur. I like phils reviews and that he is always here in the comments to answer questions and back them up. But as a trusted blogger in somewhat of a position of authority, he is subject to some criticism. That does not of course grant permission to anyone to call him names and say he sucks, but it does allow us to interact with him and perhaps, if we so presume, help him improve his writing style. A goal that all authors strive for.

      • Phil White

        SpudGun,

        Thank you sir——-

      • W

        “That is certainly an idea, however, not a very good one. If you are presenting a statement as fact, then I would like some qualitative proof to back up that fact.”

        WTF are you talking about? its not a very good idea that he write his review as he sees fit?

        • Phil White

          W,

          There is a significant difference between qualitative and quantitative data. This link describes the difference. Qualitative is subjective while quantitative is measurable information. In this instance quantitative would be the correct terminology. I actually used both in the review. I’m not knocking anyone but the difference in terms is significant. I thought you might want to know:-)
          http://regentsprep.org/REgents/math/ALGEBRA/AD1/qualquant.htm

      • W

        I understand the difference and recall posting the difference between the two on this blog before, though am baffled at what this has to do with my post?

        My entire point was that it is your review and if people think they can do better, than they should post their own review LOL

        • Phil White

          W,

          It really doesn’t have much to do with yours. It was on his post you quoted part of. I picked up on the difference between the two so I figured I’d add that in. Thanks for the comment:-)

  • jay1975

    Another 1911 from Sig? Awesome! I just wish they would make more AR style weapons, because, unlike the 1911, there just doesn’t seem to be enough out there. Okay, let me turn the sarcasm lock off and get real. When are we going to start seeing some innovation from these gun manufacturers? It seems like they have lost the drive to challenge the market and are all just jumping on the bandwagon. Ruger now has a 1911, Para tried making an AR style rifle, S&W now has AR’s and Sig has both. Where are the industry leaders? Copying a proven system doesn’t set you apart from the crowd; rather, it makes you only one of hundreds and does not serve to set you apart.

    • Phil White

      jay1975,

      The gun companies spend a lot of bucks to see what the market wants. All they are really doing is filling a perceived need or desire from the public, Sure they could go out and design some unique guns but if they don’t sell then they go out of business.
      Like I told Komrad more new designs are on the way for review.

    • W

      what innovation are you talking about? phase disruptors, caseless ammunition, or plasma pistols? because those technologies are the next step.

      When it comes to AR15s and 1911’s, go ahead and saturate the market. i hope they do 🙂

      • Matt G.

        While I agree with Phil that gun companies have to make what sells, I would very much prefer they funnel some of that money into next generation rifles. The acr and scar have proven that there are improvements to be made, we just need someone who can execute them better, as the scar is not ideal and acr is made by shrubmaster. .

  • DaveR

    Wow. This is actually a nicely spec-ed gun! Yeah sure, there are a lot of 1911s out there, but the combo of an Officer’s frame and a 4+” barrel is a rarity even in the current, super-abundance of 1911s. This kind of configuration comes as close as any to meeting my definition of the perfect carry 1911 (the “perfect” carry 1911 would be an Officer’s frame and a 5″ bbl). However, I must agree with the critics pointing at the price tag–that’ll put a lot of people off.

    • Phil White

      DaveR,

      I obviously liked that setup as well. Prices across the board are getting a little better but they are still a bit to high. Materials are higher priced now since the Chinese and others are buying so much of the same raw materials gun makers use.

      • Matt G.

        I agree. I’ve always hated than companies insist on shortening barrels for so-called “carry” guns when barrel length has almost nothing to do with concealment. It’s all in the length of the grip.

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          The shorter the barrel the more likely you will have feeding problems as well!

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          This officers grip actually works better than a full size grip with the round butt backstrap. I’ve tried carrying it in a Crossbreed IWB and a Rafter high rise holster. This grip doesn’t bite into your side or print under a light jacket.

  • Proofreading tip: If an editor went through the article and removed every apostrophe, the article would have fewer errors than it does now.

    That said, I really like the look of this Sig. But since there are no pictures of the muzzle or of it disassembled: Does it have a traditional plug & short guide rod?

    • Phil White

      Mike,

      Hey I majored in locking up bad guys and teaching computer science on the college level:-) I’m pretty sure Steve reads them as well before publishing. I do know that two of us go over the reviews before they are placed in publish status. You’ll have to ask Steve if he reads them but I’m pretty certain he does. Most of us make some errors.The most important part is the content but I do my best with punctuation, grammar etc.. My apologies if that’s distracting for you.
      To answer your question it has a medium length GI type plug and short guide rod which makes me happy.

  • evenstill

    Good interview of a great gun. My daily carry is the Sig 1911 RCS Nitron which is basically the same gun but with a light weight alloy frame and Sigs Nitron (aka W-DLC, Ionbond) finish on both the frame and slide. One note regarding your interview however . . . the gun weight is incorrect. The 29.5 oz weight is for the lighter alloy framed versions (C3, C3 Plus, RCS) while the all steel 1911 Traditional Compact Stainless is closer to 36 oz. I contacted Sig Sauer regarding the error and they said they were aware of the typo on the website and would eventually get around to correcting it. Just FYI . . . 🙂

    • Phil White

      evenstill,

      Ah your correct on the weight. It’s certainly not 29.5 oz. I’ll change Sigs typo. The alloy frame is a very easy pistol to carry all day! That was my second choice if this gun had not been available. Glad you liked the review:-)

  • Andy

    400 rounds and no issues? Wow, it’s a keeper for sure. Most Glocks I buy completely seize up after the first mag.

    And your first sentence…..apparently you haven’t been paying attention to what Sig has put out in the past 5 years or so.

    • Phil White

      Andy,

      Ok your pulling my leg– I get it:-) If you mean the Sig .22’s perhaps? I haven’t shot one of those but the regular “P” series I haven’t seen a change in quality. Can you tell me which ones you’re referring to? I’d really like to know.

      • Matt G.

        The sigusa rifles have been less than satisfactory and the p250 is a stillbirth.

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          I can’t say otherwise Matt. I’ve never shot either one.

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          The AR they make is a good one—–

      • Matt G.

        I have no experience with the Sig AR but I would like to. I’d definitely looks very nice.

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          Would you believe Wal-Mart is selling them for $897!

      • Matt G.

        I wouldn’t count the sig .22s. They are made by Umarex just like the walthers and Umarex ain’t exactly Wilson combat. I do think sig needs to restrict what they put their name on to stuff that works. But the P250 is all on them, I certainly hope whoever was behind that has been reprimanded. And sig needs to ditch the 556 and just sell us the 551 like we want.(I may be confusing numbers but I think that is right)

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          I’m just thinking out loud but I believe we will see some changes in Sigs rifle lineup. I’m seeing more 556 rifles on sale lately.

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          I was thinking about the full size .22 1911. I agree the numbers on the rifle models are easy to mess up:-)

      • Matt G.

        That price sounds good! It’s a piston rifle right?

        Unrelated; I wish this comments softwar would allow is to reply any specific post. It seems our posts are getting Out of order because you can only reply to the origional post in a string of replys.

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          No it’s not a piston but a regular AR setup. I asked if this model is a Wal-Mart only gun and they weren’t sure. I’m going to give Sig a call and ask about this.

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          I’ll ask about that Matt——

          Matt I asked Steve about your concern. He said it’s setup to only allow two level deep replies. He advised it gets to be a real mess if you go any further with it.

      • SpudGun

        It is a tad confusing, but I believe the 556 is the closet copy to the 550 series with an AK style piston and the 516 is the closet copy to an AR style piston.

        • Phil White

          SpudGun,

          Yep, the 516 is the AR piston system—-

      • Matt G.

        These replys are getting completely jumbled, so I’m going to quote each post in replying to.

        “Matt,

        I was thinking about the full size .22 1911. I agree the numbers on the rifle models are easy to mess up:-)”

        I saw one of those at the gun shop. I would ask sig who makes them(sig or Umarex) before buying. The Umarex-made sig mosquito and walther p22 both have a rep for developing stress cracks in the slide after a while. Granted this is completely different design though, so may not be subject to the same flaws.

        And I also saw that my local walmart had two ARs in the display case! One was a ho-hum bushmaster and the other I think was a sig, but it was different one with rifle length barrel and Moe handguards.

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          Thanks for the information. That WalMart Sig is the same one our store has. The longer barrel, MOE handguard, grip and rifle stock. Anything from Umarex in a handgun makes me a little leery no matter who’s name is on it.

      • Steve N

        I currently own the Sig 516 Patrol, it is a gorgeous rifle, I compared it to all the others my local gun store currently had in stock(none of which were mil spec). This gun has great milling work done, as well as a high quality finished presentation, and is super reliable thus far. I’d recommend one, my dad just bought a DDM4 and its on par in areas and in others it looks better finished. Too bad my Sig isnt as light as his DDM4 though, only downside.

        • Phil White

          Steve,

          Good to hear Steve. I heard they were a bit heavier but very well made and finished. I saw that one on the Military channel last week. They only had good things to say about it’s function and of course it being somewhat heavier. Enjoy!

    • SpudGun

      doh! *closest* not closet.

    • Nicks87

      “400 rounds and no issues? Wow, it’s a keeper for sure. Most Glocks I buy completely seize up after the first mag.”

      I laughed so hard after reading that I almost died!

  • Ron Johnson

    Great review!

    The first handgun I bought was a Browning BDA in 45ACP. Still have it (and the original box). Amazing pistol in that is is still match accurate and 100% reliable. At the time, all the LEOs that worked with and for my late father ALL said I should have bought a Colt … until they saw how well it shot. Back in 2002 I bought another SIG P220 to “retire” by BDA to the safe.

    While I like to carry my SIG P220, I do like single action autos. I have two Behlert tuned SA pistols (a Browning HP and Colt Combat Commander) but don’t wish to utilize them for everyday carry. Based on your excellent review, I will definitely check this new SIG out.

    Thanks!

    • Phil White

      Ron,

      It sounds like you took a similar path with your gun choices. After all these years I’d probably do the same and keep the BDA in the safe except for special occasions. I’m sure you’ll be pleased if you decide to check this Sig out! I’m glad you enjoyed the review:-)

  • AznMike

    Just curious but could you explain what you meant when you said that “However, for legal reasons I would advise against it on a carry pistol.”?

    • Phil White

      AznMike,

      Sure, back several years ago we used to have our duty guns slicked up. We were told to stop and keep our guns purely stock. It seems a lawsuit was filed in California after an officer involved shooting showed the officer had some work done on his pistol namely a trigger job. The lawyers had a hayday with that and the city paid out big bucks to the family. The bad ol Police had a hair trigger on his gun. of course he didn’t but the jury bought it. Since that time a number of similar lawsuits have been filed on civilians as well.
      Bottom line if you remove the 80’s series safety system and install the Brownells piece that keeps the pistol functional you put yourself in a bad situation should you ever have to protect yourself. if you only intend to use the gun on the range or competition there’s no problem. Just don’t change much if you carry the pistol for protection.
      Since that lawsuit one part has been reversed. You can have the action worked on and a reliability package. Just no triggers under 4 pounds and leave any perceived safeties alone.

      • fw226

        I’m curious about this now, not that I’ve done any work on my issued Sig. Do you have a link or names on hand for that case so I can look it up?

        • Phil White

          fw226,

          I don’t have any of the information on hand but I will get it for you. It may take a few days to contact the right people with the Thanksgiving holiday and all. I have a contact with the FOP and others so give me until about next Wednesday or so.

  • mattkTX

    This is my favorite blog, i read it every day, because it is everything it should be and nothing it shouldnt. This is the first comment i have ever left, which to me is a bad sign. Steve, im a big fan, and i understand that we all have to put food on the table, but please DONT sell out your unique skill of objectivity.

  • Haezeus

    If you had to choose between a Springfield Loaded Champion and this Sig, which would you prefer? That’s my current conundrum.

    • Phil White

      Haezeus,

      I have a Champion in the two tone green and black LW frame. I have to say this Sig is more reliable though. The Springfield is a very good gun but I found I have to pick and choose ammo for it. Not all hollowpoints have been trouble free in feeding. If I had to choose between the two I would pick this Sig without hesitation. I hope that helps you some.

      • Haezeus

        Thanks! It does.

        • Phil White

          Haezeus,

          Good deal—enjoy it!

      • Haezeus

        I just ordered the Sig. It’ll be here next week. Thanks for helping me pick my new carry gun!

        • Phil White

          Haezeus,

          You are very welcome sir! It’s always a pleasure to help:-) I know you’ll enjoy it as much as I have this one. Let me know when you get it and make it to the range. Just drop a comment here and I’ll email you if that’s ok.

      • Haezeus

        Will do!

        • Phil White

          Haezeus, and all the readers—I wish you all a very Happy Thanksgiving!

          Phil

      • Haezeus

        My Sig came in today! I had a chance to put 200 rounds down range.

        • Phil White

          Haezeus,

          Hey, good deal I hope you enjoyed it!

  • Shooter

    Sorry, but based on the opening parapgrah, I have an exceedingly hard time viewing the reviewer as anything but a shill for Sig. Most people who are deeply involved into the firearms industry view Sig as having massively jumped the shark; when someone suddenly pops up and starts talking about how good Sig quality and engineering is, I have to assume they’re either a puppet or completely ignorant of the current marketplace, gathering their information exclusively from reading copies of American Rifleman…

    Hell, even the last issue of American Handgunner had a delicately subtle bash from the editor towards “non-gun executives” who “jump from company to company” focused only towards the bottom line…anyone who works in this field knows that those lines were referring to Cohen’s leadership at Sig and none other. I was shocked and impressed to see the magazine take at least a step forwards towards calling them out, even if the general public buying a copy from the newsstand won’t have any idea who Huntington was referring to.

    • Phil White

      Shooter,

      To answer your comment the short answer is I’m not a shill and I’m not uninformed. My integrity can’t be bought by any gun company ever! Executives have been playing musical chairs for a very long time. Companies are bought and sold a fair number of times as well. Look at S&W and how often they have changed owners over the last thirty years or so. They are still a great company. A new non-gun executive doesn’t always translate to changes in the manufacturing process. Certainly it can happen but not as often as you may think. I don’t read American Handgunner so I can’t say what the remainder of the editors comment pertained to. I only read American Rifleman since I’m an NRA member.
      The review is about this Sig only not about the executive situation. I stand by my opinion based on the experiences I’ve personally had with Sig guns. I won’t change my opinions on Sig or any other company unless I or someone I trust a great deal presents information to the contrary. Most print publications I generally ignore and rely on folks I know in the industry for verified information. You opinion is as appreciated as anyones with the exception of the first sentence.
      The first sentence is a bit over the top. I don’t hold that against you in any way but a bit of thought might be in order as to the accusation of something that personal without knowing me or my values. Perhaps another term would be better—here is the definition of a Shill—- Slang a confidence trickster’s assistant, esp a person who poses as an ordinary customer, gambler, etc., in order to entice others to participate.

      • Shooter

        It’s a loaded word to use, but consider the context. I *don’t* know you, any more than I know any other reviewer online. I don’t expect anyone to write a piece completely free from bias, but when someone writes of a company I know to have numerous, serious, well-publicized issues in a manner that can only be described as positively glowing and ebullient, it begs the question of the reviewer’s impartiality and knowledge of the subject. The fact that you profess not to read one of the top two or three publications in the field is distressing: I understand that most things printed are complete garbage, but as the line from The Hunt for Red October goes, it is wise to know the ways of one’s adversary. If for nothing else than to know the disposition of their strength and stategy.

        Let me amend the statement to thus: Your overly positive terms of description for Sig-Sauer lead one to suspect that you are blissfully unacquainted with their recent shortcomings as a manufacturer. I am glad that you haven’t suffered from such (shrinking as the pool may be, there are still many who have nothing but good experiences with Sig), but would appreciate seeing a greater degree of restraint applied in the use of positive adjectives involving their product. Just for grins, I’d recommend a quick perusal of the Sig-specific webforums to view the issues brought up by various experts in the field.

        Aside from that though, please keep up the good work!

        • Phil White

          Shooter,

          I don’t really consider the print publications my enemy at all. I know they live by advertisement dollars (unlike TFB) so they are under a lot of pressure to do reviews that pretty much dictate almost all guns are wonderful! I just don’t get any information from them I can’t get from people in the industry not associated with a particular brand.
          As far as Internet forums I take what I read on most of them with a grain of salt. There are so many shooters on the forums who hate anything they don’t carry so the information is tainted in many instances. These are the reasons I rely on personal experience and those few I trust to tell me how it is regardless of the various forum rumors. Of course some are true but sorting the wheat from the chaff can be daunting.
          In spite of this I will do as you requested and check a Sig forum I’m familiar with.

          Take care:-)

        • Phil White

          Shooter,

          After our last post I went to the Sig Forum and posted a question about Sig quality. I’ve received a good number of replies since this morning of which only one had problems which were cured by cleaning his magazines. All of the other responders had no problems including one owner who has about 25 Sigs in his collection. These are a few German made guns with most made in Hew Hampshire.

        • Phil White

          Shooter,

          As we talked about I did go to the Sig forum and posted about quality. The responses are here– http://sigforum.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/430601935/m/8350095172/p/1

    • Nicks87

      No, Phil is not a “shill” for sig.

      He’s just a shill for the 1911 crowd.

      I’m sick of hearing about these novelty pistols anyway thats why I dont visit thefirearmblog as much as I used to.

      Although, they do stay up-to-date on the newest in weaponry, we are still being force fed 1911 propaganda on a regular basis.

  • I was not a huge fan of the other Sig 1911s. Didn’t they have compatibility problems with holsters made for standard 1911s. This one isn’t bad looking.

    • Phil White

      Frank,

      Yes, the other models that Sig still makes won’t fit a regular 1911 holster. The slide on those is wider than normal. These “Traditional” models follow the standard pattern so any 1911 holster wil work with it.

  • Nicks87

    I hate to kick a dead horse but…

    What can a 1911 do that a Glock/H&K/M&P cant do better/more reliably?

    For those that dont know the anwser is: NOTHING!

    1911s are antique/novelty firearms that are purchesed by people who want to live vicariously throught their guns. The same people who watch way to many action movies and wear camoflage on a daily basis.

    • Phil White

      Nicks87,

      Nick if you said anything positive in your comments I’d be shocked–LOL! You do keep me entertained though:-)

  • Nicks87

    “400 rounds and no issues? Wow, it’s a keeper for sure. Most Glocks I buy completely seize up after the first mag.”

    I laughed so hard after reading that I almost died!

    We have some serious comedians on this blog.

  • Steve Vidmar

    First, Phil, thanks for the review. As for the comments re “gushing admiration,” if I found a semi-auto that went through 400 rounds without a malfunction, I’d be running down the street kissing strangers. If the gun truly performed that well, what’s not to admire?

    Second, it seems to me one of the biggest benefits of the Compact would be compatability with traditional 1911-style holsters. I have a Sig RCS, which would be (in my opinion) the perfect carry weapon if would fit the standard 1911 holsters made by Galco, Comp-Tac, etc.

    Finally, I’ve been thinking of buying a Springfield Loaded Ultra Compact, specifically because of the holster issue with the RCS. Are you familiar with the Springfield? If so, how would you say it compares with the Sig Traditional Compact? Although the street prices are about the same, the Springfield is almost impossible to find, which is another reason why I’m now interested in the Sig.

    Thanks again for your reviews. Keep up the good work!

    • Matt G.

      Steve, if you are amazed by pistols that can cycle 400 rounds before malfunctioning, I think you’ve been hanging out with 1911’s too long.

      I would introduce you to every gun I’ve ever owned, but I don’t want you arrested for kissing strangers like a crazy person. 🙂

    • Phil White

      Steve,

      Thanks Steve I appreciate it. I wish I could be of more help with the Springfield but I haven’t had a chance to get my hands on one. I have seen a few on the Guns America auction site. There are very few out there though. I’ll try to contact Springfield for you and see what I can find out on availability. I know it can be difficult to find holsters for a fair number of pistols. Maybe I should say decent holsters like Galco and Comp-Tac.
      I have to say though I really like this Sig:-) The 4 inch barrel with a compact frame just carries so well.

  • Jason in Iowa

    “What can a 1911 do that a Glock/H&K/M&P cant do better/more reliably?”
    Well, as a Glock owner, I can say that the single action 1911 locks up quicker, and has a much shorter, crisper and more enjoyable trigger pull. In other words, with practice you can shoot more quickly and accurately.
    That counts for something.

    • Phil White

      Jason,

      That it does Jason that it does:-)

  • John DePace

    Just picked up the same model today. WOW! What a great gun. And I love the classic lines more than I thought I would. Sig owes you a commission!

    • Phil White

      John,

      I wish they would pay a commission I could buy more ammo for my reviews–LOL! I can’t tell you how pleased I am you’re enjoying the Sig. That traditional look and the total reliability is impressive. With that shorter grip and four inch barrel I can’t think of a better configuration for a carry gun.

      Enjoy!!!

      • John

        Phil:

        Now I’m looking for the right holster. Any recommendations would be great. I definitely need an OWB solution first. I wear business clothes, jackets, etc., but need to be able to remove the weapon and holster quickly and easily. The simple Fobus models work fine with my Glocks for OWB, but I’d like leather for the 1911. I ordered a Galco Snap on Scabbard (SSS model) to see if it’s easy to use/take off, etc., but I’ve heard they tend to tilt outward at the heel. L

        et me know if you have any suggestions? I don’t know if it exists, but I wonder if there’s a paddle set up with a leather holster and maybe a horse hide padldle? Let me know your thoughts.

        Keep up the good work! John

        • Phil White

          John,

          Thanks John I’ll sure try to keep it up:-) Well sir the holster I use on my 1911’s is made by Erik Little who has a one man shop and makes what I think are the best quality holsters going. He uses prime saddle leather from a company in Kentucky. I have four of his holsters and really have been pleased. They hold the gun fairly high and very close to the body. Here is a link to the one I had in mind.

          http://www.combatgunleather.com/index.php?view=detail&id=60&option=com_joomgallery&Itemid=46

  • DanOfNix

    If you have some calipers handy, could you please check the side width? I need something thinner than a Glock 9mm for summer carry. I’m eyeing the PM9, but a commander slide / officer frame 1911 setup looks interesting.

    • Phil White

      DanOfNix,

      Dan the width of the slide is 1.4 inches which is less than the Glock. I’ve always had very good luck concealing a Commander. Certainly easier than a Glock.The Kahr is .90 inches. I honestly don’t think you would notice much difference between the Kahr and Commander size.

      • Matt G.

        Are you sure Phil? I have a hard time believing a 1911 slide is 1.4 inches wide. The one I’m holding here looks to be 7/8ths of an inch. Did sig make theirs extra fat?

        Also, a glock 19 is only 1.20 inches wide.

        If you are looking for slim Dan, the kahrs are supposed to be good. I personally don’t care for carrying 1911s.

        The SR9C also has a slide width of only .92. And the grip on those unlike very much.

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          That’s what the Sig website says but most all of them are .98 and guess what I measured this one and it’s .98. So, Sig has an error on the website.

          • I believe Sig uses overall width on their website, so the 1.4 inch might include the thumb safety, I am not sure but just guessing. I’m trying to get my hands on A traditional compact now

      • Matt G.

        *the grip on those I LIKE very much.

        • Phil White

          Matt,

          Oh yea I do to. To me it’s just ideal to have a 4 inch barrel and Officer frame. In fact Bill Wilson is selling those now. It’s his personal choice in a carry 1911.

  • Matt G.

    Hey Phil, if you get a chance, I would love to see a review on one of the the ruger sr series. I really love holding those things at the fun (gun) store because the grip just feels perfect, but Im put off by the fact that it is a ruger and people talk smack on them.

    • Phil White

      Matt,

      There’s nothing wrong with Rugers! Granted the recalls they have had over the past couple of years haven’t helped but they still make a great gun.

  • John DePace

    I just got mine -partly based on your review. Thanks!!! I had issues feeding DPX but no issues with 230 grain Remmington. Do you think it’s a break in issue or just the fact the DPX cavity is so huge? I love DPX in my Glocks and was hoping it would work fine. Also, I noticed 2 things that concerned me. 1st is that many of the casings shot back at me

    • Phil White

      John,

      Your welcome sir:-) Well it sounds like a little fine tuning of the extractor might be in order. I’ve had a few cases go over my head but not often so I just ignore it. As long as it feeds well I’m not concerned.
      The DPX does have about the widest cavity of any hollowpoint. I’d polish the feedramp a bit. No abrasives but a Flitz will shine it up and help with those DPX rounds.

  • John DePace

    Sorry – hit “send” in error… As I was saying, casings didn’t shoot to 3 or 4 o’clock as usual, but some landed on my head. Also, looked at te casings and they had small dents in the sides. This is my first 1911 and 45ACP weapon. Is this normal or a sign of an ejector problem. Any advice would be great. I’ll be back at the range running more FMJ through it this weekend. Hopefully, it just needs a little more break in time. Man I love this pistol. I MUST get it firing my defense ammo without issues and fast!

    • Phil White

      John,

      I’d make a point to fire about 400 rounds before adjusting the extractor. There are times when these things cure themselves. The company does advise a short break-in. If that doesn’t cure it any gunsmith can adjust the extractor in less than 10 minutes for a reasonable fee.

  • Magnus

    I enjoyed your review. I just picked up a Sig 1911 Platinum Elite that is my standard carry weapon. It has been flawless so far. I am amazed at all the posts from people who are “shocked” by a fighting pistol that runs reliably right out of the box. What kind of guns are you folks buying? The last several pistols I have purchased have all run reliably from the first round. The Platinum, a Glock 22 (actually 2 of them), a Para GI Expert, a Rock Island 1911, in fact the last malfunction I can remember was a High Point I picked up because I was bored. It was awful, but the one I had before that was real shooter. Go figure.

    • Phil White

      Magnus,

      That’s really pretty normal.A few folks don’t like the 1911 so rumors are repeated as fact. Glad you liked the review!

  • I recently purchased a Sig 1991 Traditional Compact. I have fired 250 rounds through it so far with only one ejection failure.I am very happy with the gun .This is my first 1911 and probably not my last.I would buy another Sig 1911 in a heartbeat & I probably will. I real happy with the fit & finish & accuracy of this gun. I also own a Glock 27 & Ruger SP101 .357 magnum with crimson trace. They are all good guns & I carry them concealed.I have worked 27 yrs as a machinist/toolmaker so I know quality when I see it.

    • Phil White

      Charlie,

      Being a machinist you known your equipment and I agree the fit is way above average.

  • Andy C.

    Hi Phil,

    My dad is trying to find a carry weapon and has had his sights on the Kimber Super Carry Ultra and I had been trying to talk him out of it due to my own bad experience with my Kimber Grand Raptor. I was recently at a sporting goods store and saw that they had a Sig 1911 compact (I’m not sure the exact model/specs). Would you say that the Sig model is a comparable carry weapon? I know it’d save him some money, but I want to make sure that I am recommending something reliable as well.

    • Phil White

      Andy,

      It’s every bit as good if not somewhat better in this model. I’d have my dad get this pistol without reservation! They sure are reliable!

  • SharkShooter

    I recently got a 2 tone SigSauer Compact C3. Gorgeous gun with a nice feel. However, I’ve had major problems. Cleaned and oiled prior to first day shooting. I had 1 failure to load right off the bat. I had 3 more with failure to return to battery in the first 8 rounds! The last cartridge stovepiped. I was PISSED. Seriously, not with a Sig. Cartridges were also noted to be dinged.

    I called SigSauer and sent it back for a checkup. Gunsmith polished the feed and fired 100 rounds with 3 types of ammo. Ok, I got the gun back. Went to the range with 230gr American Eagle and Remington. I fired 8 magazines fairly quickly. Great groupings. I took 3 cartridges right to the forehead and the 56th round failed to feed.

    WHAT THE HELL?
    I’m open to suggestions. Thanks.

    • Xavier Ramos Santoni

      Break in the gun, 500 rounds to perfection!!

    • SocietasDraconistrarumlit1

      I see your post is from two years ago, How did the problem work out? I purchased the C3 October 2013 with crimson trace grips. I’ve put 300 rounds through it and so far excellent accuracy and performance.

  • Charlie Russell

    For those that are having feed issues with there new 1911 Sigs. May I make a recomendation.Break in your pistol with strictly ball ammo & brass cases for the first 500 rounds.You ask why? I use to build tool & dies for a living.When I built a punch for a die it would almost allways have a ball nose leed for entering the die block.And I would use liberal amounts of grease on the punch leed so that the two mating surfaces would not gall.I think that ball ammo has a better leed than hollow points & brass casings will feed better than aluminum casings because brass allready has some lubrication .I also believe that some of the hollow point ammo with splits on the ball nose could possibly drag on the feed ramp and cause problem.I use strictly ball ammo & brass casings in mine and it shoots like a champ !The first 500 rounds the ball ammo will help to burnish the feed ramp of the pistol.

  • Mike C.

    I just bought my own 1911 compact stainless and I love it as much as you seem to. I have shot around 250 hollow points through it, so far, without any issues or jams. I used this weapon for my enhanced carry course and have only used 230gr jhp ammo (the only ammo I could get locally, in bulk, at the time). You are right, the commander frame and 4.2″ barrel are a good combination for carry, imo. Thanks for the review.

    • Eric S.

      Officer Frame* 🙂 & Yes indeed

  • neorebel

    Hey Phil, I have this gun and it runs perfectly with ball, or even the large mouth bass rounds, lol.
    Seriously mine is the aluminum black frame and stainless slide. Nice rosewood grips too.
    I did put a small bumper pad on the magazine. Made by packmyre (sp) it sticks out just enough to give a little more control.
    She’s a beauty. I also carry my Fastback with the rosewoods grips. Both very nice and shoot very nicely.

  • Y K

    I always carry a 5″ 1911 [IWB] but I’m wanting to go to a 4″ Compact with smaller frame. I’ve “whittled” my choice between the SIG and the new SA Compact Range Officer. I already have the 5″ Range Officer, which is a quite excellent 1911 so the Compact RO should be nice too BUT I like the night sites and stainless steel of the Sig so I’ll probably get it.