RUAG will be exporting ammunition to the United States

I just received a press release saying that RUAG Ammotec, a Swiss firm, has just established a subsidiary in the United States.

RUAG 9mm Luger SINTOX Action 4

It seems like they are more interested in law enforcement and government contract that they are in civilian sales. From the press release:

Precision Ammunition, established in 2001, holds extensive patents for their Copper-Matrix NTF® Non-Toxic Frangible bullet. Providing a healthier shooting environment, Copper-Matrix NTF is particularly well-suited for training law enforcement, military and security personnel, as well as being a perfect match for use in shooting ranges.

“RUAG Ammotec and Precision Ammunition are a perfect fit for each other and will drive forward RUAG Ammotec’s growth strategy worldwide by opening up new markets and strengthening individual product groups. The combination of innovative bullet design with large scale, high quality component production reflects the increasing demand for non-toxic frangible ammunition,” stated Cyril Kubelka, CEO of RUAG Ammotec and a member of the Executive Board of RUAG Holding AG. “Additionally, it establishes a US presence for the RUAG family of business to actively bid on US Government contracts.”

I hope they decide to sell to individuals in the future. They make some very interesting rifle and pistols round.

Just last week we discussed RUAG Ammotec on The Firearm Blog.



Steve Johnson

Founder and Dictator-In-Chief of TFB. A passionate gun owner, a shooting enthusiast and totally tacti-uncool. Favorite first date location: any gun range. Steve can be contacted here.


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  • Nooky

    Ruag is a Swiss firm. It belong to the Swiss Confederation. The production site for this ammo is in germany, but the company is Swiss.

    • Nooky, thanks Nooky, I have updated the blog post.

  • Ed

    I’ve shot RUAG .338 Lapua Mag. and it is quite nice. Hope they sell to individuals.

  • Ed

    I had a varied batch of the old Geco Action Safety Slug (marketed in the US as B.A.T.) back in the 1980s. In the early 1990s, I discovered that many of the rounds, which had previously functioned 100%, now failed to detonate. I notified a friend who also had a number of these rounds, gunwriter Stan Crist, and he discovered that the same thing happened, and detailed it in a 1989 issue of Special Weapons for Military and Police magazine. So I would not be too excited about these modernized version of the Geco Safety Slug as I would expect modern hollowpoints to perform better.