Surefire Micro and Mini Suppressors


Surefire are attempting to carve out a new niche with their two new “tactical” suppressors. These tiny suppressors only add a few inches to an M4 Carbine or Colt Commando. Gear Scout reports:

Surefire snuck out two new 5.56mm suppressors at Modern Day Marine Expo. The Mini and the Micro are stubby little suckers that add barely 3.6 and 2.6 inches to a weapon’s muzzle but cut down weapon signature and improve unit communication.

There is nothing magical about suppressors and they are bound to the same laws of physics as everything else. While suppressor manufactures are continuously tweaking their cans in order to maximize the sound reduction vs. weight / size ratio, ultimately if you shrink a suppressor you will reduce its effectiveness.

I doubt these will be sold to civilians. I cannot think of a single good reason why a civilian would want to purchase one of these particular suppressors, when a suppressor a few inches longer will give much better performance.

UPDATE: I may have come across as anti-suppressor. I am not. I own two and hope to buy a third within a year. They are incredibly useful and there is no reason why civilian sales should be restricted. But these particular suppressors are tiny – smaller than my .22 Rimfire suppressor – the sound reduction would be minimal. I would call it a “sound reducer” rather than a “sound suppressor”. What I meant to say is that I cannot think why a civilian would pay for these particular suppressors.

Many thanks to Jesse for the link.


Steve Johnson

Founder and Dictator-In-Chief of TFB. A passionate gun owner, a shooting enthusiast and totally tacti-uncool. Favorite first date location: any gun range. Steve can be contacted here.


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  • EgregiousCharles

    Reason #1 is you use a carbine as a home defense gun, you don’t want to go deaf if you ever have to fire it, but you still want to keep it manuverable. 5.56 carbines have been becoming quite popular as home defense guns.

  • http://gunnuts.net Caleb

    Actually, if you have a carbine for home defense, it should have a suppressor on it, and the micro/mini line are great for indoors CQB work. After shooting a suppressed carbine this week, I’m going to order a surefire flash suppressor and see if I can’t get one of their standard cans for my home defense guns.

  • B Woodman

    Ahhh, but if we could purchase one WITHOUT the BATFE tax stamp. . . . . But I dream.

  • Pathfinder

    I can think of a great reason to purchase one and pay the tax stamp – I want one!

    That’s a good enough reason for any American citizen.

  • Chris

    “I doubt these will be sold to civilians. I cannot think of a single good reason why a civilian would want to purchase one of these and pay the BAFTE tax stamp that goes with them.”

    This is sarcasm right?

    Why wouldn’t I want the least amount of weight at the end of my barrel?
    Why wouldn’t I want the shortest barrel possible?

  • Martin

    I agree that they’re too small to be of any use. If overall length is that big of an issue, you’d be better off with a bigger suppressor and a shorter barrel.

  • Matt Groom

    Civilians will buy anything the military adopts if for no other reason than aesthetics.

    All a suppressor has to do is keep you from going deaf. If it gets the sound down below 141db, that’s enough. 139db would be better, but 141db is the pain threshold. If it’s below the pain threshold, it prevents flinching, which makes the user more combat effective. A bigger can which reduces the sound of the shot more is nice, but the only thing it needs to do is protect your hearing. There are plenty of other noises out there that will make you go deaf on the battlefield, your own weapon shouldn’t be the primary cause of hearing loss.

  • http://nicholasdwolfwood.wordpress.com Wolfwood

    What about use indoors? If I’m using an AR for home defense then I’d like to suffer as little hearing loss as possible but also not have six inches hanging off the end of my rifle.

  • http://federalist.wordpress.com/2006/06/03/can-it/ Federalist

    You can’t think of a single good reason why a civilian would want to purchase these particular suppressors? Or suppressors in general? I hope you mean the former, and can explain why. If the latter … well, start by reading my post on the subject and we can go from there….

  • Stephen Proud

    You’d be surprised by the number of civilians that purchase suppressors. I personally have two. I don’t have them for the “cool factor”. I have them since they help save your hearing and make shooting more enjoyable.

    An AR-15 suppressor is heavy and a smaller one would definitly help broaden the appeal of a rifle suppressor.

  • CMathews

    You mean to tell me these don’t warp space and time? Well then, I have no use for them.

    • http://www.thefirearmblog.com Steve

      **UPDATE**: I may have come across as anti-suppressor. I am not. **I own two** and hope to buy a third within a year. They are incredibly useful and there is no reason why civilian sales should be restricted. But these particular suppressors are tiny – smaller than my .22 Rimfire suppressor – the sound reduction would be minimal. I would call it a “sound reducer” rather than a “sound suppressor”. What I meant to say is that I cannot think why a civilian would pay for these particular suppressors.

  • http://leisureguy.wordpress.com Leisureguy

    In more advanced countries (the UK for example) suppressors are legal and much used by (e.g.) rat-hunters using air rifles.

  • http://www.thegunzone.com/556dw.html Daniel E. Watters

    KAC prototyped something similar to these Surefire units several years ago, but their customer base wasn’t interested.

  • http://federalist.wordpress.com/2006/06/03/can-it/ Federalist

    Well you always have to take these figures with a grain of salt, but has Surefire put out any Noise Reduction Rating figures? We could at least compare those to their full-size suppressors to get an idea of how much suppression you’re giving up for the size.

  • Matt Groom

    I might add that Surefire is about the hardest cans to get a hold of on Earth. We got an AAC Scar-H six months before they were officially released, but we can’t even get Surefire to send us the OEM package so we can simply BUY their suppressor. I used to really like that company, but now they’re just arrogant.

    Also, getting the OEM package is important when the dealer price on their can is still about $300 above the MSRP of just about every other comparable suppressor on the market.

    I think there’s a market for short, quite-enough suppressors, but not for uber-expensive ones.

  • JeffinNZ

    Suppressors are VERY common here in New Zealand. I have two. One on my .223 Rem 700 .223 and the other on a Martini action .32-20 with a fast twist barrel. Both are over barrel models and most of the unit is behind the muzzle.
    On the .223 full power loads have a noise reduciton to that of .22RF so in the field no ear protection is needed. The added weight is a bonus for staying on target and offhand shooting.
    On the .32-20 I load cast, subsonic loads that was VERY, VERY quiet. Impact is far more audible than discharge.
    Likely anything in life however there are compromises. More weight is one and as the rate of fire goes up (varminting) mirage can become an issue also. Personally I would not be without mine now.

  • mas

    Its just a product of ATF definition. According to them anything that takes even 1db off the report is by definition a suppressor. Ignorance comes a dime a dozen which when translated to basic business economics equals mucho revenue for the parties promoting the smelly stuff.

  • KP

    Good grief. It could be mistaken for one of those large flash suppressors. I doubt it does much of anything to the noise.

  • Redchrome

    Kind of reminds me of the moderator on the muzzle of the Vietnam-era XM-177. Not big; but effective enough to save your hearing a little longer.
    I’m told by a veteran that it moderated the noise of the 11.5″ barrel down to the level of a 20″ barrel… i.e. you ideally should have hearing protection anyway; but at least you’ll recover from the temporary deafness faster. ;)

    I think they’re a fine idea. The free market thrives on providing a range of solutions to a range of problems. One of government’s main problems is that some bureaucrat chooses one solution and make everyone use it, whether it makes sense or not. :)

  • subby

    Pretty simple, these suppressors are for short barreled weapons used in CQB environments. The sound of these guns unsuppressed will guarantee heavy hearing damage if fired indoors and the flash is absolutely blinding. These things together would make everyone save professionals flinch heavily.

    These suppressors rectify that without making the gun long enough to be ineffective in CQB environments. There might be a market for them due to consumers being more knowledgeable nowadays.

  • subby

    Although these are somewhat superseded by AAC’s suppressor and muzzle flash device, which shortens a full length suppressor by a an inch and a bit.

  • Johann Buys

    I could never understand the reasoning behind the near ban on suppressors in the USA. In SA some game farmers are now charging less for game shot with a bow or suppressed rifle as it disturbes the game less.

    I would not consider hunting without a suppressor as it is cheaper and offeres me shots at game that would normally flee at the sound of the first shot. The game does run about 19-15 meters at the sonic boom but stand still after that.

  • http://leisureguy.wordpress.com Leisureguy

    As I recall, suppressors were outlawed more or less as an afterthought to the legislation being written to outlaw fully automatic arms. It wasn’t, so far as I know, a well-thought law.

  • technique

    Yup…looks like SF is doing what OPS inc has already done.
    But knowing SF…its gonna cost you way more. hopefully I’m wrong but that sure is what has kept me from buying from them.

    Here is the OPS M4-S…I am waiting for mine to come home.
    http://www.adcofirearms.com/itemdetails_.cfm?inventorynumber=3823

    and video: