CRS Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, 1999-2006 report

Last week the CRS Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, 1999-2006 report was released. I had a bit of trouble finding it online.

Here are some interesting facts from the report:

71.5% of the value of all arms agreements worldwide were with developing nations during 2006. The 2003-2006 figure is 66.4%.

This came to a total of US$28.8 Billion. A decrease of US$3 billion since 2005.

Suppliers of arms 2006 (millions of USD)
1 United States $10,306
2 Russia $8,100
3 United Kingdom $3,100
4 Germany $1,800
5 Israel $1,300
6 Sweden $1,100
7 China $800
8 Spain $300
9 Italy $300
10 France $300
11 Poland $200

Recipients of arms 2006 (millions of USD)
1 Pakistan $5,100
2 India $3,500
3 Saudi Arabia $3,200
4 Venezuela $3,100
5 Algeria $2,100
6 Israel $2,100
7 Brazil $1,100
8 Iraq $900
9 Indonesia $600
10 South Korea $500

Some interesting graphs (click to increase size):

Picture 12-2
Picture 13-1
Click here to download the report.

The Summery

This report is prepared annually to provide Congress with official, unclassified,
quantitative data on conventional arms transfers to developing nations by the United
States and foreign countries for the preceding eight calendar years for use in its
policy oversight functions. All agreement and delivery data in this report for the
United States are government-to-government Foreign Military Sales transactions.
Some general data are provided on worldwide conventional arms transfers by all
suppliers, but the principal focus is the level of arms transfers by major weapons
suppliers to nations in the developing world.

Developing nations continue to be the primary focus of foreign arms sales
activity by weapons suppliers. During the years 1999-2006, the value of arms
transfer agreements with developing nations comprised 66.4% of all such agreements
worldwide. More recently, arms transfer agreements with developing nations
constituted 65.7% of all such agreements globally from 2003-2006, and 71.5% of
these agreements in 2006.

The value of all arms transfer agreements with developing nations in 2006 was
nearly $28.8 billion. This was a decrease from $31.8 billion in 2005. In 2006, the
value of all arms deliveries to developing nations was $19.9 billion, the lowest total
in these deliveries values for the entire 1999-2006 period (in constant 2006 dollars).
Recently, from 2003-2006, the United States and Russia have dominated the
arms market in the developing world, with the United States ranking first for 3 out
of 4 years in the value of arms transfer agreements, with Russia ranking second for
3 out of these same four years. From 2003-2006, the United States made $34.1
billion in arms transfer agreements with developing nations, in constant 2006 dollars,
32.4% of all such agreements. Russia, the second leading supplier during this period,
made $25.8 billion in arms transfer agreements, or 24.5%. Collectively, the United
States and Russia made 56.9% of all arms transfer agreements with developing
nations during this four year period.

In 2006, the United States ranked first in arms transfer agreements with
developing nations with $10.3 billion or 35.8% of these agreements. Russia was
second with $8.1 billion or 28.1% of such agreements. The United Kingdom was
third with $3.1 billion or 10.8%. In 2006, the United States ranked first in the value
of arms deliveries to developing nations at nearly $8 billion, or 40.2% of all such
deliveries. Russia ranked second at $5.5 billion or 27.7% of such deliveries. The
United Kingdom ranked third at $3.3 billion or 16.6% of such deliveries.
In 2006, Pakistan ranked first in the value of arms transfer agreements among
all developing nations weapons purchasers, concluding $5.1 billion in such
agreements. India ranked second with $3.5 billion in such agreements. Saudi
Arabia ranked third with $3.2 billion.





Steve Johnson

Founder and Dictator-In-Chief of TFB. A passionate gun owner, a shooting enthusiast and totally tacti-uncool. Favorite first date location: any gun range. Steve can be contacted here.


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